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Organization name: delta state university
Key words: 'most southern' (this phrase)
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BH-261615-18

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Lee Aylward (Co Project Director: September 2018 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

This 2019 Landmarks workshop will inform participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history. Designated a National Heritage Area by U.S. Congress and a National Treasure of the National Trust for Historic Places, the Mississippi Delta is recognized as “the land where the blues was born, where the Civil Rights movement took root, and where increasingly mechanized farming sparked the Great Migration,” making it the “’cradle of American culture’ for its role in shaping our nation’s character” (National Trust, 2012). Our approach is highly experiential and tells these nationally significant heritage stories at the places where they happened.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$170,000 (approved)
$170,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


ES-256843-17

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2017 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week institutes for seventy-two school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta was presented as a Landmarks in American History workshop with NEH support in June and July of 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. This 2018 institute will inform participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history, a role that is very often ignored or overlooked. Since the Delta is a place of “mean poverty and garnish opulence” (according to Will Campbell), intellectual exploration of its heritage requires building a community of civility. Our approach is highly experiential and tells heritage stories at the places where they happened.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$189,387 (approved)
$189,387 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


BH-250794-16

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2016 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two schoolteachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta was presented with NEH support in June and July of 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. The Most Southern Place on Earth addresses all four of the goals of the Landmarks program. It informs participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history, a role that is very often ignored or overlooked. Since the Delta is a place of “mean poverty and garish opulence” (according to Will Campbell), intellectual exploration of its heritage requires building a community of civility. Our approach is highly experiential and tells heritage stories at the places where they happened.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$178,698 (approved)
$178,698 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 2/28/2018


BH-231287-15

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Rolando Herts (Project Director: February 2015 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta was presented with NEH support in June and July of 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013, and 2014. The Most Southern Place on Earth addresses all four of the goals of the Landmarks program. It informs participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history, a role that is very often ignored or overlooked. Since the Delta is a place of “mean poverty and garish opulence” (according to Will Campbell), intellectual exploration of its heritage requires building a community of civility. Our approach is highly experiential and tells heritage stories at the places where they happened.

[Grant products][Media coverage][Prizes]

Project fields:
U.S. History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$179,791 (approved)
$179,791 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


BH-50611-14

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2014 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

This workshop focuses on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, described by historian James Cobb as "the most Southern place on earth." Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, to include the documentaries LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood, alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. With music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) serving as lead scholar, the third day unfolds around the theme, "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture That Produced It." Participants visit Dockery Farms, the plantation known as the birthplace of the Blues, and consider how life in the Delta influenced the music of early Blues musicians like Charley Patton and Robert Johnson. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the Civil Rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Providing a first-hand account of this era and Civil Rights movement work, former Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee member Charles McLaurin also speaks with the group. Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, the site of Martin Luther King's assassination; they also visit other historical landmarks, cultural institutions, and music-related sites. On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) lectures on the migration of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include, among other works: James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity; John M. Barry, Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927; and Chris Crowe, Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Cultural History; U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$175,156 (approved)
$175,156 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


BH-50543-13

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2013 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus. These six-day workshops focus on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, described by historian James Cobb as "the most Southern place on earth." Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, including the documentaries LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. With music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) serving as lead scholar, the third day unfolds around the theme, "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture That Produced It." Participants visit Dockery Farms, the plantation known as the birthplace of the Blues, and consider how life in the Delta influenced the music of early Blues musicians like Charley Patton and Robert Johnson. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the Civil Rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in oppression, revolution, and reconciliation. Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, the site of Martin Luther King's assassination; they also visit other historical landmarks, cultural institutions, and music-related sites. On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) lectures on the migration of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include, among other works: James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity; John M. Barry, Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927; and Chris Crowe, Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$177,601 (approved)
$177,601 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 12/31/2014


BH-50472-12

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2012 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus. Two six-day workshops focus on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, described by historian James Cobb as "the most Southern place on earth." Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, to include the documentaries LaLee's Kin: the Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood, alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. Music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) guides the third day on "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture That Produced It," featuring a visit to Dockery Farms, the plantation known as the birthplace of the Blues, and a discussion of how life in the Delta influenced the music of early Blues musicians like Charley Patton and Robert Johnson. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the civil rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, where they also visit other historical landmarks and cultural institutions, including music-related sites. On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) lectures on the diaspora of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include the following, among other works: James Cobb, The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity; John M. Barry, Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927; and Chris Crowe, Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case.

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$181,984 (approved)
$176,149 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2012 – 12/31/2013

Funding details:
Original grant (2012) $5,835
Supplement (2013) $4,496


BH-50420-11

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2011 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta's rich history, diverse peoples, and impact on the American imagination.

"The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination. Project director Luther Brown leads the first day's seminar on Delta history and the Mississippi River, including the documentaries LaLee's Kin: The Legacy of Cotton and Fatal Flood alongside a visit to the site of the levee break in the Great Flood of 1927. During day two, historian Charles Reagan Wilson (University of Mississippi) explores the area's ethnic and religious diversity, including its early Chinese, Russian Jewish, Lebanese, and Italian communities. Music scholar David Evans (University of Memphis) guides the third day on "The Blues: American Roots Music and the Culture that Produced It," featuring a visit to Dockery Farms, the plantation viewed as the birthplace of the Blues. On day four, Delta State faculty member Henry Outlaw presents the Civil Rights movement in Mississippi, with the Emmett Till story as a case study in "oppression, revolution, and reconciliation." Participants travel on day five to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, where they also visit other historical landmarks and cultural institutions (including music-related sites). On day six, geographer John Strait (Sam Houston State University) talks about the diaspora of Delta residents to the cities of the North. Readings include The Most Southern Place on Earth: The Mississippi Delta and the Roots of Regional Identity (James Cobb), Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 (John M. Barry), and Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case (Chris Crowe), among other works.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. Regional Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$178,872 (approved)
$178,872 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


BH-50303-09

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2009 to present)

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, Culture, and History in the Mississippi Delta

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Mississippi Delta region, its rich history, its diverse peoples, and its impact on the American imagination.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$159,985 (approved)
$158,785 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BH-50293-08

Delta State University (Cleveland, MS 38733-0001)
Luther Brown (Project Director: March 2008 to present)

Place as Text in the Most Southern Place on Earth

No project description available

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$149,975 (approved)
$149,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 12/31/2009