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Organization name: east-west center
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EH-261665-18

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2018 to present)
Barbara Watson Andaya (Co Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia

A four-week institute for 25 college and university faculty on the complexities of colonialism in Southeast Asia.

"Colonial Experiences and Their Legacies in Southeast Asia" will explore the ways in which Southeast Asian societies respond to colonial presences and how the legacies of these experiences shaped later efforts to forge national identities, envision independent political futures, and imagine new state-citizen relationships. Moving chronologically from the late 19th century to the post-independence period, the institute program will foreground key themes through case studies of specific countries in the region. The program is designed to meet the teaching needs of educators in community colleges, liberal arts colleges and undergraduate serving universities. By offering deep and context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts, the program will help participants to develop curricular materials for humanities courses in history, religion, philosophy, art history and literature, and to engage such themes as globalization and cultural pluralism.

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,654 (approved)
$187,654 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 12/31/2019


EH-256793-17

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2017 to present)
Buddhist East Asia: Religion, the Arts, and Politics

A four-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty examining how Buddhism has shaped East Asia, to be held on the adjacent campuses of the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center.

"Buddhist East Asia: The Interplay of Religion, the Arts and Politics" is proposed as a four-week summer institute that will enable educators from community colleges, liberal arts colleges and universities to develop curricular content reflecting how Buddhism has both shaped and been shaped by cultures and societies in East Asia for nearly two thousand years. The program will enable participants to understand how Buddhism offered East Asians a new "total care system" that addressed both personal and social needs in ways that were inseparable from the dynamics of cultural interaction, artistic production, trade and politics, and will build on lessons learned from the very successful 2015 institute on "Buddhist Asia: Traditions, Transmissions and Transformations."

Project fields:
East Asian History; East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,257 (approved)
$187,257 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


EH-250625-16

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2016 to December 2019)
Islam in Asia: Traditions and Transformations

A four-week college and university institute for twenty-five participants, examining the history of Islam in Asia and its place in contemporary South and Southeast Asia, to be held on the adjacent campuses of the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center.

"Islam in Asia: Traditions and Transformations" will enable undergraduate educators to develop curricular content on Islam, including its origins in the Middle East, the history of its spread throughout South and Southeast Asia, and its place in contemporary Asia. Balancing the dual needs for breadth and depth in teaching and learning about traditions that are culturally and historically distant, this multidisciplinary four-week summer institute program will offer participants the context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts (in translation) needed to develop curricular materials applicable across a wide range of humanities disciplines, including religion, philosophy, history, art history and literature.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$184,668 (approved)
$173,818 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2016 – 12/31/2017


EH-231261-15

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: February 2015 to May 2017)
Confucian Asia: Traditions and Transformations

A five-week institute for twenty-five college and university teachers on Confucianism in Asia.

"Confucian Asia: Traditions and Transformations, an NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers" is proposed as a five-week program for college and university teachers that explores the origins and influence of Confucianism as an evolving system of thought and practice, including its impacts on social dynamics, the arts and politics. Offering deep and context-rich engagement with key traditions and primary texts (in translation), the multidisciplinary program will enable participants to appreciate how common Confucian values were given different practical and institutional expression as they were carried from China to Korea, Japan and Vietnam, and as East Asia embraced the global ideals of modernization and industrialization. The program will introduce participants to current scholarship on Confucianism and enable them to develop new curricular materials for use in a wide range of humanities and social science courses.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,850 (approved)
$187,001 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 12/31/2016


EH-50414-14

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2014 to April 2017)
Buddhist Asia: Traditions, Transmissions, and Transformations

A five-week summer institute for twenty-five college faculty on Buddhism in Southeast Asian  societies.

"Buddhist Asia: Traditions, Transmissions and Transformations" will introduce undergraduate educators to Buddhism as a religion that has both shaped and been shaped by cultures and societies throughout Asia for more than twenty-five hundred years. The program will explore how Buddhism spread as a "total care system" that addressed both personal and social needs in ways that were inseparable from the dynamics of cultural interaction, artistic production, trade and politics. Through context-rich engagement with key traditions, practices, and primary texts (in translation), the institute will enable participants to appreciate how Buddhism served as a powerful cultural bridge in Asia, comparable to Christianity in the West, and to develop curricular materials applicable in a wide range of humanities courses, including courses in religion, philosophy, history, art history, and literature, but also courses organized around such themes as globalization and cultural pluralism.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies; Nonwestern Religion; South Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$199,835 (approved)
$194,522 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


EH-50369-13

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2013 to August 2015)
The Mongols, Eurasia, and Global History

A five-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty to examine the defining characteristics of Mongol culture and society, emphasizing the Mongol Empire's role in shaping global history.

"The Mongols and the Eurasian Nexus of Global History" will enable undergraduate educators to develop curricula on the Mongols and the important cultural interactions that emerged in the wake of their conquests. While focusing on a pivotal period in global history and its subsequent impacts, the program will also offer resources for enhancing engagement with multiculturalism, its challenges, and creative possibilities.

Project fields:
East Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$200,000 (approved)
$200,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2013 – 6/30/2015


ME-50013-12

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: August 2011 to May 2016)
Asian Traditions and Cultural Differences: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project

A cooperative agreement for a three-year project on cultural pluralism in the context of East and Southeast Asian history and traditions for faculty and academic administrators from fifteen community colleges.

The East-West Center develops a professional and curriculum development project that engages community college faculty and academic administrators in an examination of "the historical dynamics of cultural interaction in China and Southeast Asia," focusing on the arts, literature, religious traditions, knowledge systems, and trade. Participating campuses are organized in geographically based clusters led by Middlesex Community College (MA), Community College of Philadelphia, Johnson County Community College (KS), City College of San Francisco, and Community College of Baltimore County. Project activities open with a ten-day symposium in Honolulu where participants engage in intensive study with leading scholars and develop plans for new courses or curricular revisions. Symposium readings include historical studies of East and Southeast Asia, The Analects of Confucius, and a philosophical examination of the concept of diversity, as well as supplemental readings on the regions drawn from history, politics, philosophy, religion, art, and literature. Over the next two years, Asian studies scholars visit each community college cluster in order to mentor participants as they implement plans developed at the opening symposium. In addition to conducting faculty development workshops, the mentors give public lectures. These activities are supplemented by an online conference featuring project-related research. The project concludes with a two-day conference (site to be determined). In addition to the project director, lead scholars include Thomas Kasulis (philosophy, Ohio State University), Stanley Murashige (art history, School of the Art Institute of Chicago), Morris Rossabi (history, Columbia University), and University of Hawai'i faculty members Roger Ames (philosophy), Paul Lavy (art history), and Barbara Andaya (history). Mentoring scholars are chosen based on the interests and needs of the participants.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$360,000 (approved)
$326,293 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 10/31/2015


EH-50240-10

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2010 to May 2012)
Leonard Y. Andaya (Co Project Director: March 2010 to May 2012)
The Dynamics of Cultural Unity and Diversity in Southeast Asia

A five-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty exploring the ways in which Southeast Asian societies have historically coped with diversity and striven for unity.

The Dynamics of Cultural Unity and Diversity in Southeast Asia is being proposed as a five-week summer institute designed to enable undergraduate educators infuse significant content on Southeast Asian cultures and societies into their teaching. The challenges of teaching about a region as geographically and culturally varied as Southeast Asia will be met by investigating how its cultures and societies have themselves negotiated impulses for both unity and diversity, with a particular focus on how the interplay of indigenous and outside cultures of authority have distinctively shaped Southeast Asian religious, political, literary, artistic and historiographical traditions.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$199,330 (approved)
$199,330 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011


ES-50342-10

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: March 2010 to April 2016)
Southeast Asia at the Crossroads of World War II

A three-week institute at the East-West Center for thirty school teachers to study the antecedents and consequences of World War II in Southeast Asia.

Organized by the East-West Center, this three-week institute brings together 30 secondary schoolteachers from across the U.S. to engage in a study of Southeast Asia during WWII. Designed to capture both perspective and strategic aspects of WWII in Southeast Asia, the program examines the events and mindsets that turned the region into a major theater of WWII, transforming it and setting in motion historical processes that continue to be crucial today. By exploring a familiar topic (WWII) from a new vantage point (Southeast Asia), the institute models effective teaching by connecting content to prior knowledge, teaching both content and concepts, and developing critical thinking skills, such as evaluating past knowledge and assumptions and building analysis. In so doing, the institute aims to help learners-teachers and ultimately their students construct a more nuanced understanding of the evolution of contemporary international relationships and how the world became what it is today.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,900 (approved)
$186,524 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 6/30/2012

Funding details:
Original grant (2010) $180,900
Supplement (2011) $10,000
Supplement (2016) $-4,376


BH-50411-10

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: March 2010 to April 2012)
Pearl Harbor: History and Memory Across Asia and the Pacific

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, its global context, and its place in cultural memory.

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 was a seminal event in the 20th century history of the United States. It not only engendered cultural associations for Americans, it forged definitions of American destiny and identity. Pearl Harbor has since become an enduring part of U.S. popular history (and a site of cultural memory) of an event that forever changed the United States, with ramifications that continue to unfold in the United States, Japan, and across the Asia Pacific region. The proposed workshop, "Pearl Harbor: History and Memories Across Asia and the Pacific," will place the Pearl Harbor attack in its proper global context so as to help teachers identify teaching points that address the event's broader historical, social, and cultural relevance for middle and high school humanities curricula.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,000 (approved)
$180,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2010 – 12/31/2011


EH-50195-09

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2009 to June 2011)
The Silk Roads: Early Globalization and Chinese Cultural Identity

A five-week college and university faculty institute for twenty-five participants to explore the rich history of the Silk Road.

Funding is sought for a 5-week summer institute on "The Silk Roads: Early Globalization and Chinese Cultural Identities." This program will be hosted by the Asian Studies Development Program, a Federal/State collaborative project of the East-West Center and the University of Hawaii. Through the proposed institute, 25 non-specialist, undergraduate educators will be introduced to the rich history and imaginaire of the Silk Roads to examine how global interconnectedness shapes and is shaped by culture, focusing on the complex relationships through which Chinese cultures came to be among the world's most resilient and diverse.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$199,607 (approved)
$199,607 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BI-50109-09

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 2009 to June 2011)
History and Commemoration: Legacies of the Pacific War

Two one-week workshops for fifty community college faculty members on World War II landmarks in and around Pearl Harbor in Hawai'i.

This submission proposes two one-week workshops for community college faculty on "History and Commemoration: Legacies of the Pacific War" (July 25-30; August 1-6, 2010). Utilizing resources associated with Pearl Harbor and Hawaii's World War II historic sites, the workshops will consider the importance of culture(s) of commemoration for understanding and teaching Pacific War history. The program will examine a number of key sites of memory in Hawaii, the Pacific and Asia, and provide an opportunity for participants to pursue individual research and teaching interests relevant to a range of disciplines,including history, anthropology, Asian and Pacific studies, international politics, and religion. The workshops will be cosponsored by the East-West Center, the Arizona Memorial Museum Association and the National Park Service World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Landmarks of American History for Community Colleges, WTP

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$142,000 (approved)
$142,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BH-50292-08

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: March 2008 to March 2011)
Pearl Harbor: History, Memory, Memorial

This proposal outlines a plan for two one-week workshops that provide 80 humanities teachers with training and experience in the use and interpretation of the USS Arizona Memorial, the historic site devoted to honoring those who died in the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and related material and archival resources. Through historic site visits, lectures by scholars, and sessions led by experienced teachers, participants will explore the historical significance and meanings of the attack. Participants will also develop technology-enhanced lesson plans that apply their new understanding in their teaching.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 2/28/2010


BH-50195-07

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: March 2006 to September 2008)
Pearl Harbor: History, Memory, Memorial

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers to study the history and commemoration of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

In most history books, Pearl Harbor is reduced simply as an event: a treacherous Japanese “sneak attack that incites “slumbering” America to war and ultimately to its victory. Missing is the complexity of causes and legacies of war, including social and cultural—the important lessons of history. This proposal outlines a plan for two weeklong workshops for 80 teachers, held in Honolulu, Hawaii in June and July 2007. The workshop will engage teachers in examining the Pearl Harbor attack and investigating the structuring of that history within broader social, cultural, and historical contexts that emphasize multiple perspectives and connections to global forces, events, and ideas. Participants will apply their workshop learning in web-based lessons and collaborative projects that they develop in peer groups. Project work will begin in October 2006 and end in December 2007.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 1/31/2008


BH-50237-07

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: March 2007 to July 2009)
Pearl Harbor: History, Memory, Memorial

Two one-week workshops for 80 school teachers to study the history and commemoration of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

This proposal outlines a plan for two one-week residence-based workshops that provide a combined total of 80 secondary school social studies/history teachers with training and experience in the use and interpretation of the USS Arizona Memorial and related material and archival resources. Through visits to the Memorial, a historic site (and a national shrine) devoted to honoring those who died in the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, lectures by leading scholars, and small group work sessions, participants will explore the historical significance and meanings of the attack and apply their new understanding in their everyday teaching. Project work will begin in October 2007 and end in December 2008.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2007 – 12/31/2008


BH-50098-06

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: August 2005 to November 2007)
Pearl Harbor: History, Memory, Memorial

Two week-long workshops for 80 school teachers to study the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that took place on December 7, 1941, interpreting local sites in their geographical, historical, and cultural contexts.

Pearl Harbor: History, Memory, Memorial

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006


EH-50104-06

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2006 to September 2008)
The Ideal and the Real: Arcs of Change in Chinese Culture

A five-week institute in Hawai'i for twenty-five college and university teachers on the historical dynamics of cultural change in China.

The Ideal and the Real: Arcs of Change in Chinese Culture is being proposed as a five-week summer institute to be held in Hawai`i under the auspices of the Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP), a national collaborative project jointly sponsored by the East-West Center and the University of Hawai`i. Through the proposed institute, 25 non-specialist, undergraduate educators will examine the historical interplay among religious, philosophical, social, political and artistic ideals and realities as a means of understanding the historical dynamics of cultural change in China and continuing through the country’s stunning re-emergence as a global leader.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$186,363 (approved)
$186,363 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2006 – 12/31/2007


EH-50063-05

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2005 to November 2007)
The Silk Road: Globalization and Chinese Cultural Identity

A five-week institute for twenty-five college and university faculty members to explore the rich history of the Silk Road.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$185,264 (approved)
$185,264 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2005 – 12/31/2006


BH-50008-04

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Namji Steinemann (Project Director: August 2003 to June 2005)
Pearl Harbor as Landmark in American History

Two one-week workshops to study the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, interpreting local sites in their geographical, historical, and cultural contexts.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$155,922 (approved)
$155,922 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2004 – 12/31/2004


EH-50034-04

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2004 to September 2006)
Southeast Asia: The Creative Interplay of Indigenous Impulses and Outside Influences

A five-week summer institute on Southeast Asia for twenty-five college teachers to explore the history of religion, literature, art, music, and politics in this crossroads of Asian cultures.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,365 (approved)
$187,365 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2004 – 12/31/2005


EH-50009-03

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2003 to June 2005)
Religion and Politics in India: Historical and Contemporary Experiences

A five-week institute for 25 college teachers to explore the relationship of religion and politics in contemporary India and its historical contexts.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$180,000 (approved)
$179,662 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2003 – 12/31/2004


EH-22346-02

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 2002 to June 2004)
Re-Imagining Indigenous Cultures: The Pacific Islands

A five-week institute for 25 college teachers to examine the representations of indigenous peoples of the Pacific in literature, art, and film.

Project fields:
Area Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$170,238 (approved)
$170,238 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2002 – 12/31/2003


ED-22014-01

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: October 2000 to January 2004)
Cultures of Authority in Asian Practice: A Seminar Series for Undergraduate Educators

A series of faculty development seminars and workshops to be delivered over two years by the Asian Studies Development Program at four mainland sites.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals (outright + match):
$240,000 (approved)
$235,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2001 – 10/31/2003


EH-22306-01

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Peter D. Hershock (Project Director: March 2001 to June 2003)
Empowering Relationships: Ways of Authority in Japanese Culture

A five-week national institute for 25 non-specialist college and university teachers to improve teaching about Japanese history, culture, and society by studying the theme of authority in Japanese cultural context.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$171,649 (approved)
$171,649 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2001 – 12/31/2002


EH-22265-00

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: September 2001 to February 2003)
Continuities and Crises: The Interplay of Religion & Politics in China

A five-week institute for 25 college teachers to improve teaching about the relationship of religion and politics in contemporary China and its historical contexts.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$190,661 (approved)
$190,661 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2000 – 12/31/2001

Funding details:
Original grant (2000) $178,061
Supplement (2002) $12,600


EH-22247-99

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: March 1999 to April 2001)
Religion, Philosophies, and Culture in India: Conflicts and Negotiations

A five-week national institute for 25 college and university teachers designed to strengthen the teaching of South Asian religion and philosophy, and infuse aspects of Indian culture into the undergraduate curriculum.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$195,000 (approved)
$195,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1999 – 12/31/2000


ED-21437-99

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: October 1998 to October 2000)
New Initiatives: Dialogues for Bridging African and Asian Studies in Undergraduate Education

TO SUPPORT a series of regional workshops focusing on comparative dimensions of the African and Asian cultural experience, and the development of Web-based and print materials on related topics.

Project fields:
Political Science, General

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$76,000 (approved)
$65,486 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1999 – 5/31/2000


EH-22242-98

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 1998 to September 2000)
Re-Imagining Indigenous Identities: The Pacific Islands

To support a five-week institute for 25 college teachers to explore the construction of indigenous identities in the Pacific.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$157,872 (approved)
$157,872 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1998 – 12/31/1999


ED-20669-97

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: October 1996 to May 2000)
Continuing Enhancements: Infusing Asia and the Pacific in Undergraduate Education

To support a series of local workshops and a planning meeting to bring together scholars of Asia and scholars of Africa to explore themes and events that connect the two continents.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$160,000 (approved)
$160,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1997 – 12/31/1999


FS-23085-97

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Dru C. Gladney (Project Director: March 1997 to March 1999)
National Identity in China: The New Politics of Culture

No project description available

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$98,149 (approved)
$98,149 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1997 – 9/30/1998


EH-22164-96

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: March 1996 to February 1998)
Institute on Southeast Asian Cultures

A five-week summer institute for 25 undergraduate faculty members on the diverse cultures of Southeast Asia and on the religious, philosophical, artistic and secular influences that have affected their development.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$187,856 (approved)
$187,856 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1996 – 9/30/1997


FS-23040-96

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 1996 to January 1998)
The Politics of Representation: Ethnography, Literature and Film in Oceania

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$82,851 (approved)
$82,851 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1996 – 9/30/1997


FS-22991-95

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Dru C. Gladney (Project Director: March 1996 to February 1997)
Ethnic Diversity in China: The Politics of Identity

No project description available

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$46,646 (approved)
$46,498 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1995 – 9/30/1996

Funding details:
Original grant (1995) $37,000
Supplement (1997) $9,498


FS-22749-94

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 1994 to January 1996)
The Politics of Culture and Identity: Pacific Island Perspectives

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$80,006 (approved)
$66,033 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1994 – 9/30/1995


EH-21853-94

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Elizabeth B. Buck (Project Director: April 1994 to February 1998)
Enhancing Asian Cultural Studies on College Campuses

To support a two-year project of four regional workshops and dissemination activities in partnership with a consortium of two- and four-year colleges seeking to strengthen undergraduate teaching about Asian cultures.

Project fields:
Asian Studies

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$330,000 (approved)
$330,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1994 – 9/30/1997


FS-22524-93

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 1992 to January 1994)
The Politics of Culture and Identity: Pacific Island Perspectives

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$82,518 (approved)
$80,229 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1992 – 9/30/1993


FS-22273-90

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: March 1990 to March 1992)
The Politics of Culture and Identity: Pacific Islands Perspectives

No project description available

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Seminars for College Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$73,034 (approved)
$72,138 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1990 – 9/30/1991


RO-21385-87

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Geoffrey M. White (Project Director: September 1986 to October 1989)
Cultural Encounters in the Pacific War: Text and History

To support a study of the impact of World War II on Pacific islanders based on written and oral sources and focusing on the continuing significance of the cultural encounters between the islanders and American soldiers.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
Basic Research

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$91,829 (approved)
$91,829 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1987 – 6/30/1989


GY-*1314-81

Rene T. Lysloff
East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
A New Approach to the Classification of Musical Instruments

To support work on a new system of musical instrument classification based on construction and sound production.

Project fields:
Music History and Criticism

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$6,500 (approved)
$6,112 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1982 – 8/31/1982


GN-10357-77

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
Mary G. F. Bitterman (Project Director: January 1977 to present)
Planning for Program Development

To plan for the development of media program in the humanities.

Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Humanities Projects in Media

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$20,000 (approved)
$20,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/1977 – 1/31/1978


EH-10794-76

East-West Center (Honolulu, HI 96848-1601)
John E. Walsh (Project Director: May 1977 to present)
Problems of Law and Society: Asia, The Pacific, and the U.S.

To conduct a seminar of 30 established humanist-legal scholars for use in liberal arts-law courses in American colleges and universities

Project fields:
Law and Jurisprudence

Program:
Institutes for College and University Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$36,531 (approved)
$36,531 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1977 – 8/31/1977