NEH banner

Funded Projects Query Form
13 matches

Organization name: gilder lehrman
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.031 sec

Save this query
Export results to Excel

GW-256118-17

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Susan F. Saidenberg (Project Director: January 2017 to October 2019)
Mindy DePalma (Project Director: October 2019 to present)
Revisiting the Founding Era

Implementation of a nationwide library discussion program about the Founding Era (1760–1800) and its contemporary resonances.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seeks to develop Revisiting the Founding Era, a library outreach program based on primary sources. The program will prompt conversations in 100 public libraries in underserved communities about the Founding Era and suggest how this period’s ideas continue to resonate today. New appreciation of many uniquely American ideals, achieved through a close reading of Founding Era documents, will encourage participants to explore current issues in light of historic controversies, conversations, and compromises. The Institute, in cooperation with the American Library Association and the National Constitution Center, plans to create a website, videos, and a 100-page reader in print and digital formats to support community conversations. Local libraries may use the resources in different ways to plan programs that encourage Americans to draw on these ides when talking about issues of concern in their communities.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Community Conversations

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2017 – 7/31/2020


BH-50651-14

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Kenneth T. Jackson (Project Director: March 2014 to present)
Empire City: New York and the Transformation of American Life, 1877-1929

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate major themes in local and national history from 1880 to 1929.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seeks $150,761.92 for two, one-week Landmark workshops, “Immigrant Metropolis: New York City from 1880 to 1929.” Building on Gilder Lehrman’s strong foundation of intellectually rich and academically rigorous experiences for K-12 teachers, the program will provide a site-based exploration of New York history with emphasis on the importance of the cultural, social, political, and geographical characteristics of New York in shaping its history. Historians Karen Markoe and Kenneth Jackson will lead the workshops, taking place on June 21–27, 2015, and July 19-25, 2015, at Columbia University. Lectures, discussions, readings, and work with primary sources will be supplemented by daily visits to historic sites around the metropolitan region to provide a broad overview of regional history and an understanding of how urban history relates to American history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$150,762 (approved)
$150,762 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 12/31/2015


GA-50001-13

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Susan F. Saidenberg (Project Director: October 2012 to present)
"The Long Road: America's Civil Rights Story"

The distribution of four NEH-funded films on Civil Rights history (The Abolitionists, Slavery by Another Name, Freedom Riders and The Loving Story) accompanied by a website, educational resources, and discussion guides, to public libraries and schools to encourage public conversations about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in U.S. history. Scheduled to launch in 2013 to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and continue over three years (from 2013 to 2016).

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Public Programs)

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$833,045 (approved)
$833,045 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2012 – 12/31/2016

Funding details:
Original grant (2013) $0
Supplement (2013) $575,400
Supplement (2014) $15,375


BH-50462-11

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Kenneth T. Jackson (Project Director: March 2011 to present)
Karen E. Markoe (Co Project Director: July 2011 to present)
Empire City: New York from 1877-2001

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate local and national history since 1877.

"Empire City: New York from 1877-2001" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers using New York City landmarks to illuminate major themes in local and national history since 1877. The workshops use lectures, discussions, and site visits to situate New York City within broader urban history and American history. Co-directors are Kenneth Jackson (Columbia University) and Karen Markoe (State University of New York, Maritime College). The program opens with consideration of Manhattan's rise to national dominance after the Civil War, followed by a walking tour of Central Park and visit to the New-York Historical Society, where Sandra Trenholm (Gilder Lehrman Collection) guides participants in working with primary documents. Day two's focus on Gilded Age New York includes prizewinning biographer David Nasaw (Graduate Center of City University of New York) on "Andrew Carnegie and His Gospel of Wealth," and a visit to magnate Henry Clay Frick's mansion. To explore immigration, participants read Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives and E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime, then experience immigrant neighborhoods including Five Points, Little Italy, and Chinatown. The program also addresses the "Black Metropolis," including visits to Harlem and the Bronx as well as readings from Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison. On the final day of the workshop, Joshua Freeman (Queens College) covers the transition from industrial to service and residential use, as seen in the Meat Packing District. Concluding the site visit at Ground Zero, project director Kenneth Jackson discusses the local and national effects of 9/11.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Landmarks of American History

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$158,969 (approved)
$158,969 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2011 – 12/31/2012


GI-50222-10

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Susan F. Saidenberg (Project Director: January 2010 to present)
50th Anniversary Programs: Greensboro Lunch Counter Sit-In

No project description available

Project fields:
African American Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$23,500 (approved)
$23,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2010 – 6/30/2010


GE-50316-10

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Susan F. Saidenberg (Project Director: January 2010 to present)
The Freedom to Move: Addressing Immigration, Emigration, and Forced Migration in U.S. History

Planning of a traveling exhibition and a companion website that examine migration and mobility as enduring themes in U.S. history.

The Freedom to Move: Addressing Immigration, Emigration and Forced Migration in U.S. History is a planning grant from September 2010-August 2011 that draws upon recent historical scholarship to develop an interactive traveling exhibition and a web site that will allow visitors to confront the universal human experiences of searching for work, making secure homes, and enjoying freedom and safety, and to consider why migration so often generates controversy and alarm in a nation that prides itself on being a ???Nation of Immigrants.??? It will invite viewers to think about how migrations ??? by choice and by coercion ??? are motivated and to ponder whether and how nations can shape, limit, or force the choices of millions of individuals. The planning process will include meetings of scholars to plan and refine questions and content, archival research, design of interpretive and interactive formats, and a recruitment plan for libraries, leading to an implementation proposal.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$42,940 (approved)
$42,940 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2010 – 8/31/2011


CZ-50229-10

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Lesley S. Herrmann (Project Director: February 2009 to present)
Gilder Lehrman Institute History Schools Program Transformation

Endowment, bridging funds, and direct support to fund a transformation of the Gilder Lehrman's History Schools Program.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seeks a $1,000,000 We the People Challenge Grant from the NEH to fund a transformation of its History Schools Program. This grant, along with the $3,000,000 nonfederal match, would allow the Institute to expand its network of schools, fostering student understanding of the nation's founding principles, including representative government, separation of powers, individual freedoms, and equality of opportunity. K-12 students and teachers nationwide will enjoy unprecedented access to educational materials and resources created with the Gilder Lehrman Collection, an archive of more than 60,000 documents spanning the nation's history. Using these materials to study the evolution of the founding principles in critical periods of American history, students will come to understand that the nation's development was neither pre-ordained nor uncontested, but the product of debate, conflict, and upheaval.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Special Initiatives

Division:
Challenge Grants

Total amount offered:
$1,000,000

Grant period:
9/1/2008 – 7/31/2014


ES-50298-09

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
John Demos (Project Director: March 2009 to present)
The Lost World of Early America

A two-week school teacher institute for thirty participants on major themes in colonial American history from 1600 to 1775.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seeks $108,103 for a two-week summer institute for thirty high school teachers on colonial American history at Yale University. In lectures, field trips, and readings, participants will both receive a broad overview of the era and explore the day-to-day lives of ordinary Americans. John Demos, the Samuel Knight Professor of American History emeritus at Yale who has led two NEH seminars and five Gilder Lehrman seminars on colonial America, will direct the proposed seminar. With its extensive holdings in early American documents and artifacts, its proximity to colonial-era historic sites, and its first-rate facilities, Yale is the ideal setting for a colonial American history seminar. Having directed 211 weeklong seminars for teachers since 1994, the Gilder Lehrman Institute hopes to provide a more rigorous academic experience for participants in the proposed seminar.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$108,104 (approved)
$108,104 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2009 – 12/31/2010


BQ-50001-08

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Susan F. Saidenberg (Project Director: September 2007 to present)
Abraham Lincoln: A Man of His Time, A Man for All Times, A Traveling Exhibition

The production of a six-section panel exhibition, Abraham Lincoln: A Man of His Time, A Man for All Times, to travel to 40 libraries and be accessible online along with an exhibition brochure, a multimedia resource kit and video, and programming for the public at both the local and national level.

To mark the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, with the History Channel and the National Museum of American History, proposes to create a panel exhibition entitled Lincoln: A Man of His Time, A Man for All Times, which will travel to libraries. Lincoln's actions to preserve the Union and to end slavery, and his commitment to every American's "right to rise", are the exhibition themes. Drawing primarily from Lincoln's words, the exhibition will show how he transcended his age and left a legacy that resonates for us today. The project will use a variety of program formats and new technologies: a video, "Decoding Lincoln's Legacy," featuring five Lincoln historians; an interactive CD-ROM, "Mr. Lincoln's War: Selected Letters, Photographs, & Songs"; an online version; and programs at the NMAH. The exhibition will appeal to a broad audience and encourage a deeper understanding of Lincoln and his impact on the history of the nation.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Lincoln Bicentennial Exhibitions

Division:
Public Programs

Total amounts:
$400,000 (approved)
$400,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2008 – 12/31/2012


AZ-50004-07

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Karina Gaige (Project Director: January 2007 to present)
Summer Seminar in Digital History Teaching

A four-day workshop for thirty school teachers focused on digital resources on the American Revolution and the Civil War.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seeks funding for a digital humanities workshop in American history for elementary and secondary school teachers. The four-day seminar, to be held in New York City in August of 2007, will introduce participants to the rich variety of public domain primary source material available on the Internet, including documents from the Gilder Lehrman Collection. Guided by well-known scholars, participants in the seminar will examine primary sources from the American Revolution and the Civil War, and explore ways in which they can use free, widely available software in the classroom to create multimedia historical documentaries with their students. Most importantly, the seminar will demonstrate how teachers can harness students' enthusiasm for digital technology while at the same time immersing them in primary sources from American history.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Digital Humanities Workshops

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$45,290 (approved)
$45,290 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2007 – 8/31/2007


FT-13504-77

Kenneth T. Jackson
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
The Automobile and the Suburbs, 1900-1975

To complete research for a boot on American Suburbanization, 1825- 1975. The Crabgrass Frontier will focus equally on the 19th and 20th centuries and on such topics as the country club, the yard, the trolley, and the Federal Housing Administration. However, the specific thrust is for study of the impact of the automobile and the truck on the spatial patterns of American metropolitan areas. PI will consider New York, Detroit, Memphis, and Los Angeles and other cities to a lesser degree.

Project fields:
U.S. History; Urban History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$2,500 (approved)
$2,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/1977 – 7/31/1977


EP-10232-76

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Thomas Bender (Project Director: September 1976 to present)
Archive, Historical Society, and Historical Editing Training Program

The program will develop a series of courses designed to combine traditional humanistic training in history with the technical skills needed for careers in archive and historical society administration and historical editing. Instruction in the program will be interdisciplinary and it will combine classroom instruction with practical experience for students who have their M.A. in history.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Pilot Grants - Education

Division:
Education Programs

Total amounts:
$41,128 (approved)
$41,128 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1976 – 8/31/1977


FB-10369-70

Kenneth T. Jackson
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (New York, NY 10036-5900)
Title not available

No project description available

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$8,868 (approved)
$8,868 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/1969 – 9/30/1970