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Funded Projects Query Form
9 matches

Organization name: jewish museum of maryland
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GI-264588-19

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Tracie Guy-Decker (Project Director: August 2018 to present)
Scrap Yard: Innovators of Recycling

Implementation of a traveling exhibition, website, curriculum, and public programs exploring the history of the scrap industry in America.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM) is developing Scrap Yard: Innovators of Recycling, a temporary, traveling exhibit that will allow visitors to explore the evolution of the American scrap industry over 250 years through the stories of people who created it – immigrants, their descendants and their successors. In addition to the 2,000-sq ft, experiential exhibit exploring scrap recycling through the lenses of history, sociology and technology, JMM intends to publish a companion book and free interpretive brochure, create a website, plan public programs, collect and curate select oral histories, and develop educational curricula. The exhibit will feature historical objects, oral histories, texts, images, multimedia, and interactives. Resources will be drawn from JMM’s collections, the archives of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), and a variety of other sources. Scrap Yard opens at JMM in 2019 and begins a national tour in 2020.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Labor History; U.S. History

Program:
Exhibitions: Implementation

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2019 – 5/31/2020


GI-228510-15

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Karen Falk (Project Director: August 2014 to November 2017)
Jews, Health, and Healing

Implementation of a traveling exhibition examining how medicine has shaped the way Jews are perceived and the way they see themselves.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM), requests NEH support for the implementation of "Jews, Health, and Healing," a major exhibit with related publications, programs, website, and outreach. For centuries, Jews have considered medicine a calling--an occupation of learning and good deeds, vital to all communities and worthy of high respect. At the same time, Jewish bodies and behaviors have been the subject of medical scrutiny and debate. Some experts diagnosed the entire community as diseased, while others held it up as a model of health. The exhibit will examine how medicine has shaped the way Jews are seen, and see themselves. Building on recent developments in the medical humanities, "Jews, Health, and Healing" is the first exhibit to use the social and cultural history of medicine as a window into the Jewish experience in America. The exhibit will show how medicine has been, by turns, a vehicle for marginalization, acculturation, and the strengthening of Jewish identity.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; Jewish Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$300,000 (approved)
$300,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2015 – 4/30/2017


GI-50177-10

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Karen Falk (Project Director: August 2009 to October 2012)
Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity

Implementation of a traveling exhibition and related publication, programs, and online resources examining Jewish American foodways.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM) requests NEH support for a major exhibition and related publications, programs, and robust web-based resources titled Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity. For Jews, as for other Americans, food is never just about consumption: food is a means to observe and to celebrate, to maintain tradition and to mark transition, to preserve memory and to produce new meaning. American Jewish foodways, in short, open up a host of conversations about the history and experience of being ethnic and American in the 21st century. After opening at the JMM in Baltimore, the exhibition will be traveled to New York, Atlanta, and Portland, OR. By incorporating historical and cross-cultural perspectives, the Chosen Food project will demonstrate how the humanities reveal the extraordinary in the everyday, bringing to diverse public audiences a new understanding of history and culture through a close examination of food and foodways.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$250,000 (approved)
$250,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2010 – 6/30/2012


GE-50072-08

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Karen Falk (Project Director: January 2008 to March 2010)
Chosen Food: Adaptation, Identity, and Debate in American Jewish Foodways

Planning for a traveling exhibition, a catalog, a website, and educational and public programs examining Jewish foodways as expressions of tradition and adaptation.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland (JMM), a leading center of American Jewish history and culture, requests NEH support to research and plan an interpretive project titled Chosen Food: Adapation, Identity, and Debate in American Jewish Foodways. This grant will provide funds for a team of humanities scholars adn design consultants to help JMM staff and its institutional partners plan an integrated intitiative consisting of a 2,000 square-foot exhibition which will travel to at least three venues across the United States, an exhibition catalog and interpretive brochure, public programs, educational activities, and an interactive website. "Chosen Food" will interpret the many meanings of Jewish foodways to a large, multicultural audience across the country. For Jews, as for other Americans, food is never just about consumption: food is a means to observe and to celebrate, to maintain tradition and to makr transition, to preserve memory and to produce new meaning.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2008 – 1/31/2010


GM-50477-05

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Melissa J. Martens (Project Director: February 2005 to September 2006)
The Role of Vacations in the Formation of an American Jewish Identity

Implementation of a traveling exhibition, catalog, and public and educational programs interpreting the history and cultural meanings of Jewish vacationing in America.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$116,500 (approved)
$116,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2005 – 5/31/2006


GM-50023-03

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Melissa J. Martens (Project Director: September 2002 to March 2005)
The Other Promised Land: Vacationing, Identity, and the Jewish-American Dream

Consultation with scholars to develop a traveling exhibition interpreting the cultural meanings of Jewish vacationing in America.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2003 – 12/31/2004


GM-26183-00

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Avi Y. Decter (Project Director: May 2000 to February 2002)
Small Town Jews

To support consultation for a traveling exhibition on the dynamics of Jewish identity and inter-group relations in small towns in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$8,700 (approved)
$8,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2000 – 12/31/2001


GM-11401-78

Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
Avi Y. Decter (Project Director: February 1978 to present)
Planning for the Exhibition "American Jewish History"

To plan a permanent exhibition, including an interpretive program, a catalogue/brochure, and an audio-visual presentation, on the Jewish experience in America using the Museum's collections. Exhibit will be designed to appeal to the general public, both Jewish and non-Jewish, local, national, and international.

Project fields:
Jewish Studies

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$9,855 (approved)
$9,855 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/1978 – 7/31/1978


FT-12402-75

Florence J. Cohen
Jewish Museum of Maryland (Baltimore, MD 21202-4606)
The Impact of Political Repression on the Creative Artist

To interview Russian writers, poets, artists, and other people in creative fields in order to explore the impact of a restrictive society on the wellsprings of creative expression and artistic achievement. These artists will be interviewed for the second time by the grantee, this time 2 years after they have had an opportunity to realize life and work in a free society. These taped interviews will provide vital information for a book, titled, The Ma Tryeshka Doll: Artist as Echo, which will be completed in December 1975.

Project fields:
Literature, General; Political Science, General

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Totals:
$2,000 (approved)
$2,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1975 – 8/31/1975