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Funded Projects Query Form
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Organization name: museum of chinese
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PG-280897-21

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: January 2021 to present)
Rehousing Traditional Chinese Opera Costumes and QiPaos in Vertical Storage System

The purchase of vertical storage units with hangers, padding, and cloth rods, along with hands-on training, for the rehousing of four collections of textiles, including 117 opera costumes and 330 QiPaos (traditional Chinese dresses), from the Museum of Chinese in America, formerly the Museum of Chinese in the Americas (MOCA). These textiles were damaged in a January 2020 fire and previously had been housed in textile boxes that were overfilled due to space constraints. After the fire they were sent to two professional documentary recovery firms for immediate treatment and then returned to MOCA. A December 2020 Mellon-funded assessment determined that the next steps for conservation work would be to fully stabilize and rehouse the collection. With NEH funding, A. M. Art Conservation LLC would conduct a workshop for MOCA staff and interns, and students from the Fashion Institute of Technology, to identify materials and methods for rehousing the collection, followed by an implementation phase in which staff and interns would professionally unpack and rehouse the textiles in more secure and accessible storage.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) seeks funding from the NEH to professionally rehouse 117 opera costumes and 330 QiPaos (traditional Chinese dresses) that have been water damaged following a 5-alarm fire that tore through MOCA’s Collections and Research Center in January 2020. Since this catastrophic event, these valuable textiles have been confined to small non-archival boxes where they are suffering from fabric creases and abrasion. MOCA’s staff and interns will be trained and advised by professional conservators to unpack the materials from the textile boxes and to rehouse them. MOCA will also purchase vertical storage units with hangers, padding, and cloth rods where these textiles could be properly rehoused. This work is essential to ensure that these textiles embodying the transnational and intergenerational histories of the Chinese in America maintain their quality for years to come.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies, General; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2021 – 8/31/2022


PB-272698-20

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: March 2020 to present)
MOCA Fire Recovery Fund

On the 23th of January 2020, MOCA’s archives experienced a devastating fire at its 70 Mulberry Street location. The archival collection, 85,000 items acquired over 40 years, is the largest repository of Chinese American artifacts in the country and embodies the rich history of an immigrant population salient to the narrative of the United States. Most of the collection is feared to have been damaged or destroyed by smoke and water.  MOCA has now retrieved 80,000 items. Our immediate needs are immense. Drying out the items rescued is first priority to prevent permanent water and mold damage.  A Chairman’s grant of $30,000 would go a long way in the first phase of MOCA's fire recovery process.

Project fields:
East Asian History; U.S. History

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (P&A)

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2020 – 3/31/2021


PG-266590-19

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: January 2019 to present)
First phase fire recovery efforts for the Museum of Chinese in the Americas archive

The purchase of preservation supplies to rehouse the museum’s newspaper collection, consisting of 8,000 issues dating from 1952 to 2008 that feature news stories on the local politics and community life of Chinese Americans in Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, Fort Lauderdale, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston.  As recommended by a previous assessment, rehousing the newspapers within flat archival boxes would protect them for use by current and future researchers.  The collection has drawn attention from historians of the Chinese diaspora in the United States and is an important resource of information on socio-economic and political topics, as well as on historical figures not covered by mainstream media outlets at the time.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) respectfully requests a grant of $10,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities in order to rehouse our newspaper collection of over 8,000 individual issues from 33 different publishers located across North America. The publication dates range from 1952 through 2008 with about 40% of the collection written in English and the other 60% written in Chinese. This project will enable us to rehouse, restore, and preserve these newspapers for years of research and scholarship on Chinese American communities to come.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Asian American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2020


PY-263754-19

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: May 2018 to present)
Melissa Wansin Wong (Co Project Director: March 2020 to March 2020)
Our Family Treasures

A day-long digitization event to document the personal and family histories of the  Chinese American community, focusing on records and ephemera from family and professional associations, churches, and Chinese schools.  Preservation workshops for the public would be featured at the digitization event, as well as periodically throughout the year on such topics as photograph preservation, textile and object preservation, and training in how to record and save family stories.  Museum staff would also host a subsequent open house with tours of the archives and a “Letters Alive!” program, which would feature readings (in Mandarin and English) of historical letters from the archives written to Chinese American immigrants by their loved ones in China.  With donor permission, digitized materials would be made available for research at the museum’s archives and on the website.  The project would build upon an earlier Common Heritage award by expanding the museum’s outreach efforts in New York City, home to the largest Chinese population of any city outside of Asia.

The Museum of Chinese in America seeks a $12,000 grant from NEH to support Our Family Treasures. This program series aims to preserve, digitize and showcase Chinese-American family and community history and culture. The series consists of: one day-long Our Family Treasures preservation & digital archiving program; four to five how-to workshops led by professional archivists on preserving heritage materials; and monthly one-on-one digitization and consultation sessions with the Museum’s Collections staff. Working on the premise that American history and experience is shaped by the material culture and memories of those who interact intimately with them over time, Our Family Treasures spotlights the untold stories and living histories of immigrant communities in New York City and their heirlooms—objects, photos, paper documents, business and association paraphernalia, and other ephemera of familial and cultural importance—a goal that has been central to MOCA's mission since our founding.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History; Public History

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020


PG-252938-17

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)
Condition Reporting and Rehousing the Paper Sculpture Collection at the Museum of Chinese in America

Hiring of an object conservator and the purchase of preservation supplies to support the rehousing of 175 paper sculptures created by passengers of the Golden Venture ship during their detention by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service between 1993 and 1997. Using recycled and found materials, the sculptures range in size from a few inches to a 4-foot-long replica of the Golden Venture. The conservation consultant will create detailed condition reports for each object and train museum staff to construct custom archival boxes and supports for each sculpture.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) requests $6,000 to commission Lauren Paige Isaacs, an objects conservation specialist, to evaluate and rehouse the museum’s collection of 175 paper sculptures. This project would be a follow-up to the recommendations made by Tara D. Kennedy in her 2012 Conservation Assessment. The sculptures belong to MOCA’s Fly to Freedom collection, which explores the circumstances and hardships faced by a group of undocumented Chinese immigrants that were detained by the Immigration and Naturalization Services after their ship ran aground at Rockaway Beach in Queens, NY in 1993. In 2018 - 25 years after the refugees’ arrival - the museum plans to display these sculptures in a show that will examine the current state of immigration in America. It is imperative that we are able to properly house these pieces to retard their deterioration as well as evaluate them for any damage they may have sustained while being housed in inadequate containers.

Project fields:
Arts, General; Asian American Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


PG-233678-16

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: May 2015 to September 2017)
Mechanical System and Storage Environment Assessment at the Museum of Chinese in America

Hiring a consultant to assess environmental conditions and evaluate mechanical systems in the museum’s storage and off-site exhibition areas. The Museum of Chinese in America is a nationally significant and heavily used repository of materials documenting Chinese life in America. The museum’s collection contains over 65,000 documents, photographs, artifacts, and memorabilia, while the library contains an additional 10,000 audiovisual recordings, books, magazines, and newspapers. Central to the library’s holdings are its oral history interviews, which record the personal experiences of Chinese and Chinese Americans in the New York Chinatown area, and the only surviving physical copies of the Chinese American Times.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) respectfully requests $6,000 to commission Jeremy Linden, an Environmental Specialist from the Image Permanence Institute to visit the collections space at 70 Mulberry Street and the exhibition space at 215 Centre Street in New York City to assess their mechanical systems. This would be the next step of a long-term effort to preserve an important collection that documents Chinese American history and culture. The project will allow MOCA to utilize the data collected by the data loggers that were purchased and installed last year with the help of an award from the NEH. The consultation with the Environmental Specialist will include analysis of the preservation quality of monitored storage locations for specific collection types and suggestions for sustainable environmental parameters which lead to optimal operation by providing the best possible storage environment and the least possible consumption of energy.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 6/30/2017


PY-234576-16

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: June 2015 to April 2017)
Our Family Treasures at the Museum of Chinese in America

A project by the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), in the heart of historic Chinatown, New York City, to document Chinese American history by providing members of the public opportunities to learn how to store, preserve, and share family objects and stories. This project would offer a day-long event for attendees to digitize personal items and to participate in presentations and workshops on Chinese American history and on ways to research and preserve their family heritage. Digital images and object stories would be accessible on MOCA’s Mapping Our Heritage Project, an online repository hosted by the museum. Following the digitization event, MOCA would offer a series of four workshops focused on training youth and their families in techniques for researching family histories and conducting oral history interviews. MOCA would also combine digitization opportunities at their regularly scheduled public programs, which spotlight first-person stories by authors, filmmakers, historians, and community members, who present behind-the-scenes perspectives into how they have researched their own family histories. Overall, the aim of the project is to highlight the untold stories and the living histories of Chinese immigrant communities in New York City.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) seeks a grant to support Our Family Treasures - a public program and education initiative aimed at preserving, digitizing and showcasing family and community history and culture through a day-long Our Family Treasures preservation and digital archiving program; an introductory workshop series for youth; and public programs at the Museum and Queens Public Library. Working on the premise that American history and experience is shaped by the material culture and memories of those who interact intimately with them over time, Our Family Treasures spotlights the untold stories and living histories of immigrant communities in New York City and their heirlooms. This project is part of a larger, ongoing museum effort to more fully capture the richness of the City’s growing immigrant population with multifaceted neighborhoods of working families, diverse cultural heritages, and industries, as well as the diversity of the Chinese diaspora across America.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies

Program:
Common Heritage

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2016 – 12/31/2016


ES-231160-15

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Joy Liu (Project Director: February 2015 to July 2016)
Lauren Nechamkin (Project Director: July 2016 to present)
The Chinese Exclusion Act and Immigration in America

A two-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its legacy.

On June 18th, 2012 Congress passed a resolution expressing “regret” for its 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, the first such statement in the 130 years since the Act’s passing. Such Congressional action prompted three humanities projects that address Chinese Exclusion and its legacy: a major NEH-supported traveling exhibition of the New-York Historical Society on view from September 2014 – April 2015, the NEH-supported historical documentary by Ric Burns that will air nationally in fall 2015, and the proposed NEH Summer Institute for Teachers at the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) scheduled for July 10-23, 2016. The Summer Institute will enable 25 K-12 teachers to learn from leading scholars and work with primary materials and artifacts. Participants will also develop pedagogical approaches for integrating these unique objects and original documents into their local school curricula and explore new perspectives on the history of immigration, citizenship, and what it means to be American.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; Immigration History; U.S. History

Program:
Institutes for K-12 Educators

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$141,963 (approved)
$141,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2015 – 2/28/2017


PG-52326-14

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: May 2013 to October 2015)
Enhancing Environmental Monitoring at the Museum of Chinese in America

The development of an environmental monitoring program, including the purchase of dataloggers, for the Collections and Research Center of the Museum of Chinese in America. The bulk of the collections is from the 20th century and documents the history of Chinese culture in the United States through photographs, oral histories, newspapers, magazines, books, and scholarly journals. The oral history collection includes 320 recordings that document voices from diverse perspectives including the lives of garment, restaurant, and laundry workers; nightclub performers; and community residents. Topics covered in these oral histories include the Chinese-American experience and neighborhood gentrification; interviews from the 9/11 Chinatown Documentation Project treat the lasting impacts of the attacks on the Chinatown neighborhood. The museum's collections have provided sources for numerous scholarly publications on Chinese-American history and the wider Chinese diaspora and also support permanent exhibitions open to the public.

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) respectfully requests a grant of $6,000 to establish an environmental monitoring program consisting of 10 dataloggers and appropriate monitoring software in the Museum's Collections and Research Center located at 70 Mulberry Street in New York City. An environmental monitoring program is part of a broader long-term effort to preserve the collections that document the history and culture of Chinese America. Most collections date from the early- and mid-20th century to the present day, and include 2,800 square feet of photographs, artifacts, and memorabilia, 2,000 oral histories, 2,000 books and 6,000 newspapers, newsletters, magazines, and scholarly journals from MOCA's library that were published between 1900 and 1980. The project will allow MOCA to control climate conditions in collections storage areas, assist a separate effort to restore its HVAC system to an optimal level, and assess the collections' sustainability in their current location.

Project fields:
American Studies; Asian American Studies; Urban Studies

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$5,975 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2014 – 6/30/2015


PA-51029-05

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Robert Jerome Meyer (Project Director: May 2004 to February 2007)
Preservation of Historic Chinese Costumes

Consultation with a conservator who will develop a preservation plan for 77 Chinese dresses custom-tailored in the 1930s and 1940s and 26 intricate Chinese opera costumes from New York City's oldest Chinese opera club.

Project fields:
Archival Management and Conservation

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 6/30/2006


GM-25433-95

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Adrienne Cooper (Project Director: December 1994 to July 1999)
A Good Place to Land One's Feet: Brooklyn's New Chinese Community

To support two exhibitions, a poster exhibition, and catalog on Bat Dai Do, a new Chinese community in Brooklyn, and its links to the older Manhattan Chinatown.

Project fields:
Urban Studies

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$130,000 (approved)
$130,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1995 – 12/31/1998


GP-21944-94

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Adrienne Cooper (Project Director: March 1994 to September 1996)
Allies and Enemies: The Dilemmas of Asian Americans During WW II, A Public Humanities Series

To support a conference, film discussions, lecture-demonstrations, and a resource book that focus on the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
11/1/1994 – 2/28/1996


GM-24714-92

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
John Kuo Wei Tchen (Project Director: December 1991 to August 1996)
Remembering New York Chinatown

To support the extensive, year-long evaluation and reinstallation of an exhibition on the history of New York Chinatown at the Chinatown History Museum.

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1992 – 12/31/1995


GM-24270-90

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
John Kuo Wei Tchen (Project Director: December 1989 to December 1991)
Memories of New York's Chinatown

To support planning for a long-term exhibition on the history of the Chinese in New York City.

Project fields:
Asian American Studies; U.S. History

Program:
Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical Organizations

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$65,000 (approved)
$65,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/1990 – 6/30/1991


GP-*1979-80

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
John Kuo Wei Tchen (Project Director: February 1980 to October 1990)
New York Chinatown History Project

To support planning for public programming and a permanent community historical agency designed to help Chinese and non-Chinese Americans learn about the rich and intricate history of New York's Chinatown.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Special Projects

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$64,890 (approved)
$64,890 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/1980 – 7/31/1981


GY-10049-72

Museum of Chinese in the Americas (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Fay Chew (Project Director: June 1972 to present)
Chinatown Oral History Project

GY-10047: To trace the changes that have taken place over the past 100 years in a Detroit neighborhood. Ethnic groups studied include Greek Orthodox and Hungarian.

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85

Division:
Public Programs

Totals:
$8,534 (approved)
$8,534 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/1972 – 9/30/1972