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Organization name: university of arkansas
Key words: archaeological (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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PG-51926-13

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Mary C. Suter (Project Director: May 2012 to present)
Preservation of Archeological Artifacts from Northwest and Northeast Arkansas

The purchase of archival quality storage supplies to complete the rehousing of 223,928 inventoried archaeological artifacts from 12 counties in northwest Arkansas and 16 counties in northeast Arkansas in the collections of the University of Arkansas Museum. These artifacts represent the legacy of Archaic period peoples through the mound-building Mississippian culture and span the period from 5,000 BCE to CE 1,500. They include stone tools and pottery shards, 5,244 fragile whole ceramic vessels, and organic artifacts including moccasins and baby cradles.

The project would provide an object-level preservation environment for the University of Arkansas Museum's archeological collections from northwest Arkansas bluff shelters and northeast Arkansas mound sites. The bluff shelter sites are unique in that they include preserved organics such as cane, grass, wood, and seeds, materials not normally preserved in archaeological contexts. The mound sites represent the material culture of the populous Mississippian peoples in present-day Arkansas that DeSoto met in 1541 on his march through the American southeast. Both of these collections are used to better understand the culture, lifeways, foodways, and religion of these Precolumbian peoples. These collections are currently stored in acidic boxes and trays. The purchase of storage supplies would allow us to transfer the collections into archival-quality boxes and trays for improved object preservation and access.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Preservation Assistance Grants

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$5,797 (approved)
$5,477 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2013 – 6/30/2014


PW-51419-13

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: July 2012 to present)
The CORONA Atlas Project: Correction and distribution of declassified satellite imagery for archaeological research.

The second phase of a project to create a digital archaeological atlas of Old World archaeological sites with an emphasis on central and eastern China, southeastern Europe, central Asia, the Indus Valley, and the African Sahel, based on 3,000 CORONA satellite images, augmenting images of the Near East that were the focus of the first phase of the project.

This project seeks funding to expand an online database of declassified, Cold War-era CORONA satellite imagery, collected as part of the world's first intelligence satellite imaging program from 1960-1972. These unique images, made publicly available in 1996, have proven to be a critical resource in archaeology, primarily because they preserve a picture of sites and landscapes that predates recent agricultural, industrial and urban development. Such land use changes have often resulted in archaeological features being obscured or destroyed, and CORONA is therefore a truly unique resource, enabling archaeologists to reconstruct and virtually explore lost landscapes. Research in the Near East, where CORONA has been most extensively utilized, shows its potential as a tool for the discovery and mapping of archaeological sites, the documentation of associated roads, canals and field systems, and the reconstruction of ancient landscapes.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$275,000 (approved)
$275,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2013 – 6/30/2017


HD-51753-13

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Fred Limp (Project Director: October 2012 to present)
21st Century Data, 21st Century Publications: 3D Model Publication and building the Peer Reviewer Community

The development of a publication framework and peer reviewer community for scholarly publication of the three-dimensional models and complex datasets produced by archaeological research.

The preservation and dissemination of 3D archaeological data, and the adaptation of peer review to accommodate publications based on complex digital data and models, are key emergent issues in 21st-century archaeology and related fields in the humanities. The core problems this project addresses are (a) developing a process for the peer reviewed publication of the kinds of digital 3d models and complex, interactive datasets projects like ours are now producing, and (b) building a community of peer reviewers with the necessary skills and background to properly evaluate these publications. This project will support the creation of a pilot publication, which will be the focus of efforts to define a publication medium which effectively communicates the narratives constructed with these complex data and models and will move towards defining the process, or framework, for larger scale publications, providing the training and knowledge transfer needed.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,719 (approved)
$49,719 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2013 – 12/31/2015


HD-51590-12

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: October 2011 to present)
Mapping archaeological landscapes through aerial thermographic imaging

Research into the best techniques for using aerial thermographic imaging to support archeological research, with tests to be run at sites in Cyprus, Dubai, and South Dakota.

This project aims to develop techniques for efficient, high-resolution aerial thermal infrared imaging of archaeological sites and surrounding landscapes. Archaeologists have been aware since the 1970s that images which record thermal wavelengths of light can reveal surface and buried archaeological features that are otherwise invisible, but the costs and difficulty of the technology has made its application beyond the reach of most scholars. This project will develop methods for collecting high-resolution thermal infrared images using a specialized camera mounted on a remote-controlled unmanned aerial vehicle. Conducting surveys at archaeological sites in three environmentally and culturally distinct regions--Cyprus, Dubai and South Dakota--our results will demonstrate the potential and limitations of the technology in a variety of archaeological contexts, offer guidelines for executing surveys and processing results, and serve as a blueprint for other investigators in the future.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$49,999 (approved)
$49,999 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2012 – 7/31/2014


HT-50038-10

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: February 2010 to present)
Institute for Digital Archaeology

A semester-long program of advanced training in geospatial technologies critical to the practice of modern archaeology, followed by participation in field projects.

This proposal seeks funding to support a program designed to provide junior scholars in archaeology with advanced training in geospatial technologies and their application to archaeological research. While geospatial technologies ranging from satellite remote sensing, to subsurface geophysical prospection, to three dimensional scanning and visualization have all become increasingly critical to modern archaeology, few practitioners have the necessary technical skills to integrate these technologies into research and teaching programs. Participants in this program will have the opportunity to spend an entire semester taking a series of intensive courses in geospatial technologies and make use of the hardware, software and instrumentation available at the University of Arkansas's Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies on independent research projects. On-campus training will be followed up by participation in one of numerous archaeological field projects.

[White paper]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Division:
Digital Humanities

Total amounts:
$249,885 (approved)
$249,756 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2010 – 6/30/2013


PW-50083-08

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Jesse J. Casana (Project Director: July 2007 to present)
CORONA Archaeological Atlas of the Middle East

The creation of a digital archaeological atlas of selected sites from the greater Near East (North Africa to Central Asia) based on CORONA satellite images.

Archaeologists have long appreciated the the extraordinary power of aerial photography and satellite imagery to aid in the discovery and interpretation of arcaeological sites, the recognition of larger cultural landscape features. However in the Middle East, no imagey of adequate spatial resolution was available to archaeologists until 1995, when a large archive of US intelligence satellite images from the 1960s and 1970s, know as CORONA, were declassified and made publicly available. These images provide stunning, high resolution views of the landscape before urbanization and expansion, and have been employed recently in a handful of innovative archaeological projects in the Middle East. However, these images as distributed by the USGS exhibit severe distortions and must be photogrammetrically corrected making them useful to only a handful of specialists. This project will develop and distribe a digital CORONA satellite imagery-based archaeological atlas of the Middle East.

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$338,045 (approved)
$338,045 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2008 – 7/31/2011


RZ-50107-03

University of Arkansas, Arkansas Archaeological Survey (Fayetteville, AR 72702)
George Sabo (Project Director: August 2002 to present)
Rock Art and the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex

A study of ancient Native American cosmology and ritual though an investigation of rock art production in the Mississippi period (900-1600 C.E.) at a series of Arkansas sites. (36 months)

This three-year project seeks to contribute new information on ancient Native American cosmology and ritual by investigating the role of rock art production in the Mississippi period (A.D. 900-1600) Southeastern Ceremonial Complex. Field investigations will be conducted at a series of Arkansas sites. Subsequent analysis will examine rock art iconography, the geographical context and cultural landscape relationships of rock art sites, and the cultural rules associated with rock art site selection and image production.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
Archaeology

Program:
Collaborative Research

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$175,000 (approved)
$174,310 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2003 – 12/31/2006


PH-20893-99

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Fayetteville, AR 72701-1201)
Mary C. Suter (Project Director: July 1998 to present)
Improving Storage of Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Historical Collections

To support the purchase of storage furniture and the rehousing of the combined archaeological, ethnographic, and historical collections of the University Museum and the Arkansas Archaeological Survey.

Project fields:
Anthropology

Program:
National Heritage Preservation Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Total amounts:
$193,548 (approved)
$193,548 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/1999 – 3/31/2002