NEH banner

[light] [dark]

Funded Projects Query Form
6 matches

Participant name: Deborah Anderson
Organization name: University of California
Keywords: Unicode (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
Sort order: Award year, descending

Query elapsed time: 0.016 sec

Export results to Excel
Save this query

PR-268710-20

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: May 2019 to present)
Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of eight scripts—six historical and two modern—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and to promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred and thirty eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for two modern and six historical scripts (or major script additions) for inclusion in the standard, and pave the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and other user communities.

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$306,370 (approved)
$302,910 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2020 – 2/28/2022


PR-253360-17

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: June 2016 to present)
Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of nine scripts—four modern and five historical—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred and fifty eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for four modern and five historical scripts for inclusion in the standard, and pave the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and the use. The project will also develop and make available fonts for the non-Latin scripts of ancient Italy, in order to aid scholars.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Ancient Languages; Languages, General; Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$274,840 (approved)
$274,840 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2017 – 9/30/2020


PR-50205-15

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: May 2014 to January 2018)
Universal Scripts Project

The preparation of twelve scripts—seven historical and five modern—for inclusion in the international Unicode standard, to aid research using materials in historical scripts and promote communication in minority language communities.

Although computer and mobile users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing system, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. More than one hundred eligible scripts are not yet included in Unicode, which directly affects humanities research, the creation of the global digital repository of humankind's literary and cultural heritage and, for users of modern scripts, basic communication. This project will fund proposals for five modern and seven historical scripts for inclusion in the standard, thereby preserving text materials in these scripts and paving the way for electronic communication in (and about) scripts by scholars and the user communities at large.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$264,700 (approved)
$264,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2015 – 9/30/2017


PW-50441-09

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: August 2008 to January 2013)
Universal Scripts Project

A research and development project to incorporate seventeen historical and minority language scripts into the Unicode standard for character representation.

Although computer users in many parts of the world can now communicate in hundreds of languages by using their own native writing systems, there are still linguistic minority groups, and users of historical writing systems, who cannot. This is because the letters and symbols of these scripts are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. Since continued corporate interest and support for these scripts is uncertain, communication among the groups who use them, and long-term access to their written cultural and historical resources, is threatened -- creating a serious gap for humanities scholarship. This project will fund proposals to adopt five modern and twelve historical scripts into the standard, and will foster collaboration among scholars, users, and institutions to continue working on more proposals, so that computers will ultimately support all the world's scripts.

Project fields:
Linguistics

Program:
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$226,000 (approved)
$226,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2009 – 9/30/2012


PR-50004-07

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: July 2006 to December 2009)
Universal Scripts Project

Incorporation into the Unicode standard of 15 historical and minority language scripts.

Although computer users in many parts of the world can now communicate using their own native writing systems, there are still at least 40 linguistic minority scripts, and about 40 more scripts of historical importance, that are difficult or impossible to use because they are not yet part of the international character encoding standard, known as Unicode. And because continued corporate interest and support for these scripts is uncertain, communication among the groups who use them, and long-term access to their written cultural and historical resources, is threatened. This project will fund proposals to adopt 9 modern and 6 historical scripts into the standard, and will foster collaboration among scholars, users, and institutions to continue working on more proposals, so that computers will ultimately support all the world's scripts.

Project fields:
Languages, General

Program:
Research and Development

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$269,200 (approved)
$269,200 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2007 – 9/30/2009


PA-51171-05

Regents of the University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA 94704-5940)
Deborah Winthrop Anderson (Project Director: July 2004 to May 2008)
Universal Scripts Project

Incorporation into the Unicode standard of 14 historical and minority language scripts.

While the scripts most commonly used today can be viewed and sent electronically over the Internet, those of about 30 linguistic minorities and 60 historical scripts cannot, as they are not included in the international character encoding standard,Unicode. Without a standardized encoding, digital access to texts in these scripts is difficult. Since continued corporate interest is uncertain, access to the written cultural & historical resources of many groups is in danger of being cut off. This project will fund Unicode proposals for 9 modern and 5 historical scripts, and foster collaboration among scholars, users, and institutions to continue work on script proposals so that computers will ultimately support all scripts.

Project fields:
Languages, General

Program:
Preservation/Access Projects

Division:
Preservation and Access

Totals (outright + matching):
$257,700 (approved)
$257,700 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2005 – 6/30/2007