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Participant name: Tom Ewing
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FV-256881-17

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: March 2017 to present)
Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in U.S. and World History

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and impact of the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic, held in Blacksburg, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.

Flu! The 1918 Spanish Influenza in US and World History will provide teachers with an opportunity to read and discuss the most recent scholarship by historians, epidemiologists, demographers, and public health scholars. In addition, participants will pursue their own research topics, using online newspaper databases, archived oral histories, and documentation from public health authorities. Seminar participants will acquire a broader understanding of the role of disease and health in American and world history, an awareness of how historical precedents inform current plans for dealing with global pandemics, and an appreciation of a complicated topic that engages scholarly as well as broad general interest.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, General

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$92,494 (approved)
$92,494 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 9/30/2018


HAA-256132-17

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: January 2017 to present)
Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History

An advanced workshop on incorporating digital humanities tools into medical history research. Preceded by a series of virtual meetings and activities, the two-day workshop will be held at the National Institutes of Health and will result in an open access publication of scholarly essays.

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Medical History and Digital Humanities will bring together scholars from the field of medical history whose research shows particular promise for making innovative use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop in February 2018 at the National Institutes of Health with structured virtual editing activities that produce innovative scholarship. Workshop participants include twelve Contributing Scholars, each producing a chapter of original research; Consulting Scholars who are experts in network analysis; and an Advisory Board who will coordinate stages of collaborative writing, peer review, collective editing, and final publication in an open access and freely available scholarly platform. The requested funds will support travel costs for workshop participants; salaries for a Graduate Research Assistant and the Project Director; workshop costs; and honoraria for Consulting Scholars.

[White paper][Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; History, General

Program:
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2017 – 12/31/2018


HG-229283-15

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: September 2014 to September 2019)
Tracking the Russian Flu in U.S. and German Medical and Popular Reports, 1889-1893

A collaborative research project to study the spread of the Russian influenza epidemic (1889-1893) through Europe and the United States by using large-scale computational methods on digitized collections of historical medical literature and newspapers. The German partner, Leibniz University, Hannover, is requesting 127,600€ from DFG.

This project examines US and German medical discussion and popular reporting during the Russian influenza epidemic, from its outbreak in late 1889 through the successive waves that lasted through 1893. A world-wide epidemic can be studied at every level from the microbial through the individual, communal, regional, national, and global. Digital humanities are especially suited for this kind of scalable analysis, as the close reading techniques familiar to humanities scholars are integrated with the large-scale interpretive methods of computer scientists and information scholars. The project will use historical materials to develop, apply, and evaluate new methods for computational epidemiology through applications such as word and term distribution analysis, fact extraction, sentiment analysis, network analysis and data visualization.

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Project fields:
European History; History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science

Program:
NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$175,000 (approved)
$160,678 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2015 – 3/31/2019


HC-230697-15

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: January 2015 to January 2017)
Amy K. Nelson (Co Project Director: April 2015 to January 2017)
Images and Texts in Medical History: An Introduction to Methods, Tools, and Data from the Digital Humanities

A cooperative agreement between the NEH and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to organize a two-day workshop for medical historians, librarians, archivists, and graduate students on computational approaches to studying medical images and textual materials.  The workshop would be held at the US National Library of Medicine and would include the participation of the American Association for the History of Medicine and the Wellcome Trust from the United Kingdom.

This workshop is designed to provide medical historians with an opportunity to learn about tools, methods, and texts in the digital humanities that can inform their teaching and scholarship. Presentations by leading scholars in digital humanities will demonstrate how emerging approaches to the analysis of texts and images can be used by scholars and librarians in the field of medical history. By focusing on the new methods, tools, and data related to images and texts, this workshop will engage key issues in the history of medicine, including, but not limited to, the spread of disease, the rise of health professions, scientific research, health policy, and cultural definitions of health and disease.The workshop format is designed to provide attendees with a broad awareness of potential digital humanities applications, practical advice on the value of digital tools, and guided instruction on the application of these tools to understanding materials directly relevant to their research and scholarship. By the end of the workshop, attendees should have a widely expanded toolkit for research and teaching in medical history as well as an appreciation for potential future directions in their field.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Program:
Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Digital Humanities)

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$70,000 (approved)
$65,579 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2015 – 9/30/2016


FV-50404-14

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: March 2014 to May 2016)
The Spanish Influenza of 1918

A three-week seminar for sixteen school teachers on the history and impact of the 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic.

The seminar will provide teachers with an opportunity to read and discuss the most recent scholarship on the 1918 Spanish Flu written by American and world historians as well as interdisciplinary studies by epidemiologists, demographers, and public health scholars. In addition, participants will have opportunities to pursue their own research topics, using easily accessible primary sources from online newspaper databases, archived oral histories, and documentation from public health authorities. To facilitate this original research, the seminar will spend one week in Washington DC, where participants will meet with specialists at the National Library of Medicine, the National Archives, and the Library of Congress. Seminar participants will acquire a broader understanding of the role of disease in history, an awareness of how historical precedents inform plans for dealing with global pandemics, and an appreciation of a complicated topic that engages scholarly and general interest.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History of Science; U.S. History

Program:
Seminars for School Teachers

Division:
Education Programs

Totals:
$101,917 (approved)
$92,345 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2014 – 8/31/2015


HJ-50067-12

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: July 2011 to November 2014)
Bernice Louise Hausman (Co Project Director: July 2011 to November 2014)
An Epidemiology of Information: Data Mining the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

Using the digitized newspaper archives in the NEH-funded Chronicling America and Peel's Prairie Provinces, the project explores how the spread of information found in local newspapers about the 1918 influenza pandemic influenced policy makers and the general public. The project is led by scholars from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (US) and the University of Toronto (Canada) along with additional advisors from the University of Texas, McMaster University, Simon Fraser University, and the University of Alberta. The Canadian partner, the University of Toronto, is requesting $125,000 from SSHRC.

An Epidemiology of Information: Data Mining the 1918 Influenza Pandemic seeks to harness the power of data mining techniques with the interpretive analytics of the humanities and social sciences to understand how newspapers shaped public opinion and represented authoritative knowledge during this deadly pandemic. This project makes use of the more than 100 newspaper titles for 1918 available from Chronicling America at the United States Library of Congress and the Peel’s Prairie Provinces collection at the University of Alberta Library. The application of algorithmic techniques enables the domain expert to systematically explore a broad repository of data and identify qualitative features of the pandemic in the small scale as well as the genealogy of information flow in the large scale. This research can provide methods for understanding the spread of information and the flow of disease in other societies facing the threat of pandemics.

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Project fields:
Interdisciplinary Studies, General

Program:
Digging into Data

Division:
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$123,778 (approved)
$121,901 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2012 – 6/30/2014


ED-50174-03

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Tom Ewing (Project Director: October 2002 to November 2006)
The Digital History Reader: Teaching Resources for European and United States History

The development of twenty-six online, multimedia sources that provide historical data and inquiry-based learning structures for major topics in college survey courses.

"The History Survey Online" addresses critical problems faced by college level instructors when teaching introductory level history courses. This project will everage the possiblities of digital technology to create 26 content-rich units that explore key historical events through online archives of text, image, and multimedia sources. Using a strategy of inquiry-based learning, these modules will promote student mastery of primary historical materials, encourage an understanding of history as a process of analysis and interpretation, and make use of instructional technology to enhace student engagement.

[Grant products]

Project fields:
History, General

Program:
Education Development and Demonstration

Division:
Education Programs

Totals (outright + matching):
$185,000 (approved)
$185,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2003 – 6/30/2006