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Project director: Klingle
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FZ-250429-16

Matthew Klingle
Bowdoin College (Brunswick, ME 04011-8447)

Sweet Blood: Diabetes and the Nature of Health in America

Offering a new look at an illness afflicting over 29 million Americans, this book tells the environmental, cultural, political, and scientific history of diabetes in the United States from the Gilded Age to the present day.

“Sweet Blood: Diabetes and the Nature of Health in America,” under consideration by Yale University Press, is a path-breaking history of a major illness. Through incisive research and engaging storytelling, it explores how today’s crisis grows from our changing relationship with nature. It asks questions at the heart of the humanities: Who or what is to blame for the diabetes outbreak: human behavior, genetics and evolution, or an altered environment? Why has diabetes afflicted Americans unevenly, and should society address these inequities? And what connections between human nature and physical nature might promote and sustain health? The project illuminates these questions by examining the environmental, cultural, political, and scientific history of diabetes in the United States from the Gilded Age to the present day. In the process, this project argues for an expanded idea of what counts as the environment, an important contribution to address the diabetes epidemic.

Project fields:
History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and Medicine; History, Other; U.S. History

Program:
Public Scholar Program

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$50,400 (approved)
$50,400 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2017 – 6/30/2018


FT-52796-04

Matthew Klingle
Bowdoin College (Brunswick, ME 04011-8447)

Urban by Nature: Seattle and the Making of the Modern American Environmental Metropolis

"Urban by Nature" combines environmental, social, and cultural history to analyze why Americans see cities and nature in conflict. Contrary to current attitudes, 19th century Americans considered urbanization as a process for improving nature. Trained experts, from engineers to landscape architects, believed that finishing nature through public works projects released its regenerative properties to advance reform. As a result, they created an "environmental metropolis," a fusion of artifice and nature that could be manipulated to produce both consumer goods and civic unity. But while these changes benefited some, they also spawned ecological instability and social inequality, events that split nature and cities in the minds of postwar Americans.

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Project fields:
U.S. History

Program:
Summer Stipends

Division:
Research Programs

Total amounts:
$5,000 (approved)
$5,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2004 – 7/31/2004