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Prizes for Self-Exegesis at The Margins: Boccaccio's TESEIDA DI NOZZE D'EMILIA

FT-55454-07
Self-Exegesis at The Margins: Boccaccio's TESEIDA DI NOZZE D'EMILIA
Roberta Ricci, Bryn Mawr College

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-55454-07

Prizes for Scrittura, riscrittura, autoesegesi: Voci autoriali intorno all'epica in volgare: Boccaccio, Tasso. (Book)

Fellowship [link]
Date: 4/1/2007 12:00:00 AM
Organization: Liguria Study Center for the Arts and Humanities (Bogliasco, Genova). [link]
Abstract: Tasso’s missives (Chapter II) reveal the poet’s psychological vulnerability and his growing anxiety towards literary creation and critical theory, towards narration and reflexivity, towards religious censorship and literary self-consciousness. In the Lettere Tasso declares that he refuses to abandon the ambition of producing pleasure through poetry, yet he is not fully convinced of the moral worth of the episodes concerning the female gender. Tasso’s dual position also manifests itself in the opinions he holds of his editors: whom he perceived at times as “censors,” and at others as “readers.” Tasso’s letters of 1575-76 betray enough doubt and hesitation as well as opportunism and self-deception to make his ultimate claims for the allegorical design of his narrative seem like a cover-up. The chronicle of Tasso’s progress toward an allegorical vision of his epic reveals comparable conflicts and ambivalence which have often disposed commentators to suspect the validity of their final sol

Research Grant [link]
Date: 7/1/2007 12:00:00 AM
Organization: http://www.rsa.org/
Abstract: I specifically pay attention to philological and historical issues concerning Boccaccio's Teseida commentary, which only in 1929 was recognized as autograph and thus integrated tout court with the poem. I argue that the Teseida’s paratext launches the beginning of Boccaccio’s humanistic production and represents a continuity in the author’s artistic iter. Therefore my research is not limited to examine the interdependence between poetry and prose within the Teseida, but stretches to discuss the continuum between this epic poem and Boccaccio’s subsequent erudite production written in Latin.

Research Grant [link]
Date: 7/1/2009 12:00:00 AM
Organization: Bryn Mawr College [link]

International Center Grant [link]
Date: 7/1/2009 12:00:00 AM
Organization: Bryn Mawr College [link]


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/prizes.aspx?id=1083