Grant products: Conference/Institute/Seminar (389)
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Faculty Development, as well as Pedagogical Strategies, Workshops for the fall 2015, summer 2016, and fall 2016 cohorts
Grant details: AC-226779-15
Title: Faculty Development, as well as Pedagogical Strategies, Workshops for the fall 2015, summer 2016, and fall 2016 cohorts
Abstract: The project spearheaded faculty development spaces within which presentations from, and discussions with, NYU faculty prompted BMCC faculty to disseminate knowledge, explore ideas on best (classroom) practices, and develop their own thoughts and approaches regarding global issues, thus refining the latters' courses to create a more integrated learning experience for students. Subsequent monthly Pedagogical Strategies workshops, each focused on one competency, and to which all faculty and administrators of the BMCC academic community were invited, brought together workshop participants to provide “status reports” regarding the curricula changes they implemented concerning the particular global competencies they chose to nurture
Date Range: Fall 2015 - Spring 2017
Location: Borough of Manhattan Commuinity College, CUNY


Public Presentation
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: Public Presentation
Author: Dr. Maria Cotera
Abstract: Searching for Margaret: The Ambivalent Politics of Collaboration in Jovita González and Eve Raleigh’s Caballero
Date Range: February 27, 2018
Location: Texas A&M University-Kingsville


Mini-Conference, "Towards an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists"
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: Mini-Conference, "Towards an Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists"
Author: organized by Susan Roberson
Abstract: The one-day conference brought in speakers not only from the grant participants and colleagues at TAMUK, but artists and poets from San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley. There was a rich diversity of academic papers, readings, performances, and art displays conference with
Date Range: October 11, 2018
Location: Texas A&M University-Kingsville


Frantz Fanon's Contributions to Post-Colonial Theory
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Frantz Fanon's Contributions to Post-Colonial Theory
Author: Belkis Gonzalez
Abstract: Dr. Gonazalez offered an overview of the theories of Frantz Fanon and their impact on the literature and political theory of the Americas as well as his influence on subsequent theories and authors such as Roberto Fernandez Retamar and Edward Said.
Date Range: 4/12/19
Location: LaGuardia Community College, Conference Room C-459


The Debate at Valladolid: Bartolome de las Casas vs Juan Gines de Sepulveda
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: The Debate at Valladolid: Bartolome de las Casas vs Juan Gines de Sepulveda
Author: Milton Roberto Ruiz
Abstract: Prof. Ruiz offered a comprehensive presentation on the historical and philosophical issues surrounding the Valladolid debate of 1550 regarding the nature of indigenous peoples of the Americas. The presentation discussed the important influences of Aristotle and how his ideas were being challenged partly as a result of the discovery of the New World. Prof Ruiz also discussed the significant contribution this debate made to human rights theories on a global scale.
Date Range: 5/10/19
Location: LaGuardia Community College, conference room C-459


Anti-Slavery Movement and Related Documents in the United States and Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Anti-Slavery Movement and Related Documents in the United States and Latin America
Author: Paul Fess
Abstract: Dr. Fess offered a comprehensive presentation regarding the anti-slavery movement in the United States and subsequent developments in Cuban literature. He compared the the similarities and differences of the literature and discourse of these movements.
Date Range: 5/10/19
Location: LaGuardia Community College, conference room C-459


Caliban: Culture and Nation-Building in the Caribbean
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Caliban: Culture and Nation-Building in the Caribbean
Author: Maria Victoria Perez-Rios
Abstract: Professor Perez-Rios offered a compelling presentation about the re-contextualization of the character of Caliban within the framework of post-colonial theory in the second half of the twentieth century.
Date Range: 9/27/19
Location: LaGuardia Community College, conference room C-459


Borges, "The South," and Sarmiento Revisited
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Borges, "The South," and Sarmiento Revisited
Author: Ernesto Menendez-Conde
Abstract: Dr. Menendez-Conde discussed the story by Jorge Luis Borges within the context of the debates surrounding civilization and barbarism between Jose Marti and Domingo Sarmiento in the latter half of 19th century Latin America.
Date Range: 9/27/19


The Menchu-Stoll Controversy, An Overview
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: The Menchu-Stoll Controversy, An Overview
Author: Rebecca Tally
Abstract: Dr. Tally discussed the many factors and points of view of the Menchu-Stoll controversy of the 1990s, connecting it to the seminar's previous human rights discussions involving the indigenous populations of the Americas.
Date Range: 11/22/19
Location: LaGuardia Community College, conference room C-459


Diversity In and Outside of the Classroom: A Holistic Approach to Pedagogy at an HSI and MSI
Grant details: AC-264104-19
Title: Diversity In and Outside of the Classroom: A Holistic Approach to Pedagogy at an HSI and MSI
Author: Dr. Tara Sirvent
Author: Dr. Kristen McCabe Lashua
Author: Dean Amanda Lebrecht
Abstract: This presentation will allow attendees to consider successful practices to address diverse students’ learning needs. Students, particularly if they are underrepresented minorities and/or first-generation, often need faculty and staff to work together to create a holistic approach to diversifying curriculum and pedagogy in an increasingly diverse higher education landscape. Our presentation includes a training exercise to help participants assess their own understanding of diversity as relates to successful learning outcomes. We will then discuss the creation of summer STEM and humanities bridge programs that exemplify faculty and academic support staff working together to create a comprehensive program for academic support and success.
Date Range: October 3, 2019-October 6, 2019
Location: George Fox University, Newberg, Oregon
Primary URL: https://www.cccu.org/cccu_event/2019-diversity-inclusion-conference/
Primary URL Description: Conference Program


International Kurdish Conference Booklet
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: International Kurdish Conference Booklet
Author: Mucahit Bilici
Abstract: Northeastern Illinois University’s Multilingual Learning Center in collaboration with Zahra Institute has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to develop a Kurdish Language and Culture Studies Program. It is a one-year project to develop three new courses and related curricular resources in Kurdish language and culture and an International Kurdish Studies Conference. Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago Zahra Institute July 24-25, 2019 New Perspectives in Kurdish Studies
Date Range: July 24-25, 2019
Location: Northeastern Illinois University
Primary URL: https://www.neiu.edu/academics/multilingual-learning-center/summer-institute-kurdish-language-and-culture/international-kurdish-studies-research-conference


Oral History Institute
Grant details: AC-264295-19
Title: Oral History Institute
Author: Kirsten Gardner
Author: Valerie Martinez
Abstract: Week-long institute to examine the best practices in Oral History with Expert Speakers and Invited guests.
Date Range: May 20-24, 2019
Location: San Antonio, TX
Primary URL: http://https://militarycityusa.wordpress.com
Primary URL Description: Oral History Institute material: Readings, Tips, Photos.


THE MIDDLE EAST ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: THE MIDDLE EAST ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
Author: Nayereh Tohidi
Abstract: On November 9 and 15, 2011, over 100 scholars, students, ethnic community leaders, activists, representatives of the media and interfaith groups from SoCal gathered along with CSUN faculty from the new minor initiative in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program (MEIS) at the MEIS Symposium. The symposium was to discuss with 12 distinguished experts invited to CSUN. This symposium was funded by an NEH grant and directed by Dr. Nayereh Tohidi. It aimed to help CSUN faculty with curriculum development and provided the participants with an opportunity for exchange of ideas, experiences, and best practices concerning pedagogical challenges in MEIS. Selected parts of the proceedings of this symposium will be featured on this website later.
Date Range: November 9 & 15, 2011
Location: California State University in Northridge, California
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: On November 9 and 15, 2011, over 100 scholars, students, ethnic community leaders, activists, representatives of the media and interfaith groups from SoCal gathered along with CSUN faculty from the new minor initiative in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program (MEIS) at the MEIS Symposium. The symposium was to discuss with 12 distinguished experts invited to CSUN. This symposium was funded by an NEH grant and directed by Dr. Nayereh Tohidi. It aimed to help CSUN faculty with curriculum development and provided the participants with an opportunity for exchange of ideas, experiences, and best practices concerning pedagogical challenges in MEIS. Selected parts of the proceedings of this symposium will be featured on this website later. Speakers were:


The Creation and Development of Interdisciplinary Courses and Sequences
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Creation and Development of Interdisciplinary Courses and Sequences
Author: Dr. Carolyn Haynes
Abstract: A faculty development seminar focused on the development and creation of interdisciplinary courses and sequences. Dr. Carolyn Haynes presented methods and practices on the creation of interdisciplinary courses and programs, worked with the participating professors on the creation, design, and development of their interdisciplinary courses, and worked with the Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities Project Steering Committee on the development and design of the Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence.
Date Range: 22-23 Febrary 2012
Location: Universtiy of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies in Interdisciplinary Contexts
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies in Interdisciplinary Contexts
Author: Carl Mitcham
Author: Indira Nair
Abstract: This faculty development seminar focused on the philosophical aspects of the design, use and choice of technologies. Emphasis was given to the analysis of the idea of progress, the concept of humanitarian engineering and how different conceptions of human progress relate to differences in design and innovation in technology. The seminar ended with a round table discussion on the benefits and detractions of different types of technologies. Both Drs. Nair and Mitcham served as consultants for the course team.
Date Range: 3/16/2103
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Care, Engineering, Technology, and Global Justice
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Care, Engineering, Technology, and Global Justice
Author: Indira Nair
Abstract: This talk explored some of the awareness, thinking and competencies that the global citizen of today needs in general. It touched on the aspects that all of us need to reflect on as we design or make decisions everyday about technology- care and justice in its design and use. Starting with a definition of care, the talk articulated some properties - complexity, systems, interdependence - of the technological systems that we have come to depend upon and how we could design, use and spread these with care and justice for a sustainable world. A call for reflection on the role of technology and science in today's living, in our thinking, and how to do it with care in our individual dealings and how care at this level is a pre-requisite to global justice in the deployment of technology. The primary purpose of this reflection was to consider whether we are asking the right questions, solving the right problems, and bringing the right perspectives, starting from our various disciplinary points of view.
Date Range: 3/14/2013
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Appropriate and Alternative, Technology and Life
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative, Technology and Life
Author: Carl Mitcham
Abstract: Dr. Mitcham discussed "What is "appropriate" about appropriate technology?" The question requires more than a technological or engineering response. The abbreviation of "appropriate technology" (AT) can also be read as "alternative technology." The second reading suggests a more radical approach to the same think about what we are doing as we replace the natural with the built environment and turn the world into an artifact. It is thus useful to consider the dialogue between these two terms - using two approaches to one particular kind of technology, energy technology. Whether and to what extent we can develop an appropriate or an alternative energy technology will be crucial to the kind of world-artifact we will construct. This contrast will further distinguish two approaches to an ethical assessment of energy: Type I energy ethics is grounded in a belief that increases in energy production and use are both humanizing and civilizing; Type II energy ethics questions this belief and argues that beyond a certain point, energy production and use become counterproductive. Our technological way of life is currently determined by Type I energy ethics, although Type II energy ethics deserves a hearing. A provocative illustration of the Type II approach to energy will reference energy ethics and policy in China. In the end, a case for the pursuit not just of an appropriate technology but an alternative technology and way of life was made.
Date Range: 3/14/2013
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Presentation of results and evaluations of the course on Mind, Consciousness, and Machines (originally-Embodied cognitive science: the impact of robotics.)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Presentation of results and evaluations of the course on Mind, Consciousness, and Machines (originally-Embodied cognitive science: the impact of robotics.)
Author: Ana Nieves Rosa
Author: Anderson Brown
Author: J. Fernando Vega
Abstract: The results and evaluations of the first course were presented to the NEH Convergence group and any interested professors. Materials used in the first interdisciplinary course were presented and discussed so that the participants could utilize the materials in their courses, if applicable. The results indicated that the students prefer to meet with all of the professors in all of the class meetings. They found meeting with the professors separately, did not demonstrate nor support the goals of the project or course. For this reason, one-third way through the course, then professors met with all of the students for all of the class meetings. In addition to the originally planned seminar, the course team members added information on the results and evaluations of the first team-taught course offered under the NEH grant.
Date Range: 4/14/2013
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Considerations about human and artificial intelligence from Psychology
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Considerations about human and artificial intelligence from Psychology
Author: Ana Nieves Rosa
Abstract: A discussion on the psychological aspects of artificial intelligence and the most up-to-date notion of intelligence in Psychology, as well as the implications of these debates in the conceptualizations on human intelligence; the notion of human intelligence vs. the notion of artificial intelligence. Furthermore, this seminar included an examination of the implications of both at the level of operationalization of these concepts as well as a look towards the evolution and development of both in regard to the notion of what represents intelligent behavior.
Date Range: 2/2/2013
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Questioning Technology as an Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning Experience. (Originally titled: Interdisciplinarity and Appropriate Technology)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Questioning Technology as an Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning Experience. (Originally titled: Interdisciplinarity and Appropriate Technology)
Author: Christopher Papadopoplous
Author: Marcel Castro-Sirtiche
Author: Hector Huyke
Abstract: The seminar Alternative and Appropriate Technologies: Technology for Whom? Technology for What? provided an interactive discussion of the philosophical, engineering, and technological aspects of alternative and appropriate technologies, as well as the methods and assessment results from the class. In particular, the workshop explored key motivating exercises conducted in the class, What Appropriate Technology means and how to build a course around this topic; how interdisciplinary inquiry ranging from philosophy to technical literacy was incorporated to critically examine Appropriate Technology; the interdisciplinary skills developed by students, ranging from writing critiques in essay form to estimating physical quantities; and the transformational experiences expressed by both students and faculty. The workshop was particularly useful to the following audiences: Faculty interested in teaching interdisciplinary general education courses, Faculty seeking to enrich their disciplinary courses with interdisciplinary methods, Administrators supportive of interdisciplinary general education courses. All concerned with how technology impacts society, quality of life, and wellbeing.
Date Range: 3/22/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Quantum Cosmology and Creation
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Quantum Cosmology and Creation
Author: Dr. George Coyne, S.J.
Abstract: Dr. George Coyne, S.J., Professor Emeritus of Le Moyne College in Syracuse, NY presented a seminar on cosmology and belief to the UPRM Community. This seminar focused on the philosophical and interdisciplinary aspects of cosmology. Emphasis was given to an analysis of what is the cosmos and the interdisciplinary connections between evolution, cosmology, and belief systems . Dr. Coyne is a world-wide recognized authorities on cosmology and is a former director of the Vatican Observatory and one of the leading scholars articulating a relationship between natural sciences and theology. He belongs to a group that sustains that natural sciences and religions are complementary and not in conflict. However, a possible dialogue between these two sources of knowledge raises some questions and it was these questions that were examined in the faculty and UPRM Seminars.
Date Range: 8/19/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


The Implications of Scientific Evolution to the Semantics of the Christian Faith
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Implications of Scientific Evolution to the Semantics of the Christian Faith
Author: Dr. George Coyne, S.J.
Abstract: During this seminar Dr. George Coyne, S.J., addressed the issue of how what we know from science about the evolution of life in the universe influences our religious attitudes and to what extent can religious thought contributes to our scientific understanding of the origins and evolution of life in the universe. This twofold question poses the serious risk of transgressing upon the epistemological independence of the various disciplines: theology, philosophy, astrophysics, biology and cosmology, and creating, thereby, more confusion than understanding. Therefore, it is that possible to establish a fruitful dialogue between natural sciences, philosophy and faith? What are the conditions that render possible such interdisciplinary dialogue? From the religious side this dialogue must be limited to the rational foundations for religious belief. The seminar included the following topics: (I) the Science of the Universe, Cosmology and Life's Origins, (ii) biblical faith and Christianity, (iii) possible models of interactions between natural sciences and religious faith, (iv) the limits of our scientific and religious knowledge, (v) what would both, natural sciences and religious faith, gain from a dialogue?
Date Range: 8/22/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Final Colloquium: Information, Content and results of the course: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief.
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Final Colloquium: Information, Content and results of the course: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief.
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: The seminar provided an interactive discussion of the philosophical, evolutionary, and cosmological aspects on the origins of the universe, as well as the methods and assessment results from the class and how the team integrated those topics in this type of interdisciplinary course. They also presented the results of the course, which included the evaluations of the course by both participating students and professors. In particular, the workshop explored key motivating exercises conducted in the class, such as: What are the theories of the beginning of the Universe both from the scientific and belief points of view; How could the interdisciplinary inquiry ranging from philosophy to evolution to physics explain the origins of the universe; and what does belief affect our understandings of our beginnings.
Date Range: 1/15/2015
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Final Colloquium: Information, Content and results of the course: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief.
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Final Colloquium: Information, Content and results of the course: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief.
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: The seminar provided an interactive discussion of the philosophical, evolutionary, and cosmological aspects on the origins of the universe, as well as the methods and assessment results from the class and how the team integrated those topics in this type of interdisciplinary course. They also presented the results of the course, which included the evaluations of the course by both participating students and professors. In particular, the workshop explored key motivating exercises conducted in the class, such as: What are the theories of the beginning of the Universe both from the scientific and belief points of view; How could the interdisciplinary inquiry ranging from philosophy to evolution to physics explain the origins of the universe; and what does belief affect our understandings of our beginnings.
Date Range: 1/15/2015
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Enseñanza Y Aprendizaje Interdisciplinario (Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Enseñanza Y Aprendizaje Interdisciplinario (Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning)
Author: Dana L. Collins
Abstract: A discussion of the format of the UPRM NEH project, the goals, objectives, and results of the project. It included a discussion of the courses created under the project, along with other types of interdisciplinary projects and products.
Date Range: 12/3/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Cayey


Turing Machines: Can consciousness emerge from computers?
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Turing Machines: Can consciousness emerge from computers?
Author: J. Fernando Vega
Abstract: Dr. Vega examined the history of Turing machines and their abilities and uses from the perspective of Godel's incompleteness theorems. The enduring questions examined were: Is the brain a Turing machine? Can the paradoxes and apparent contradictions of human thought be explained in the light of Godel's theorem? When the limits of electronic computers are reached, can quantum computers offer the solution to many the current shortcomings of artificial intelligence? Will (or can) consciousness emerge from computing machines?
Date Range: 4/20/2013
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


The Problem of Consciousness. (original title: Mental representation: The Cartesian tradition and contemporary alternatives)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Problem of Consciousness. (original title: Mental representation: The Cartesian tradition and contemporary alternatives)
Author: Anderson Brown
Abstract: A discussion of the the mind/body dualism as derived form Descartes and contemporary philosophers and the assigned readings. The discussion covered a brief history of mind/body dualism and its effect or influence on the development of "thinking" machines or how humans view the possibility of machines that "think". This seminar was offered on 22 March 2012 and was attended by the members of the NEH group and interested faculty members from the College of Arts and Sciences
Date Range: 3/22/2012
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


The Creation and Development of Interdisciplinary Courses
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Creation and Development of Interdisciplinary Courses
Author: Dr. Carolyn Haynes
Abstract: Research and discussion on the creation of interdisciplinary courses began the first cycle of seminars in order to prepare the participants for creating and offering their own interdisciplinary courses. Dr. Carolyn Haynes, consultant of the Integrative Studies Association, gave a two day seminar (The Creation and Development of Interdisciplinary Courses) on the elements of interdisciplinary studies in 25-26 February 2012. This seminar was attended by all participating faculty members, as well as interested faculty from across the disciplines. In this seminar, Dr. Haynes led the participants in an investigation of how an interdisciplinary context could be employed at UPRM. The principal topics discussed in this seminar were: • basic design of interdisciplinary courses • design of assignments or the courses • methods for evaluation of the courses • possible obstacles confronted by those interested in working in an interdisciplinary context During the course of the seminar, the participants worked in cross-disciplinary groups on various mini-projects to aid them in designing topics and materials for interdisciplinary research. These cross-disciplinary groups included faculty members from the Humanities, the Sciences, and Engineering fields.
Date Range: 2/25/2012
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


The biology of the fungal tree of life
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The biology of the fungal tree of life
Author: Dr. Donald Pfister
Abstract: In the seminar for the UPRM community, Dr. Pfister discussed the use of evolution and ecology to provide students with important life skills in regard to being informed global citizens. In this workshop he explored how it is that historical topics around early evolution debates set the stage for present day concepts and presentations. Using a course that was developed for the General Education program at Harvard University, we examined the way in which an integrated presentation (with literature, biology, and history) can lead students to broaden their views about the world in which they live and relate to their studies outside particular fields.
Date Range: 1/16/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Trees and forests: teaching evolution and biodiversity
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Trees and forests: teaching evolution and biodiversity
Author: Dr. Donald Pfister
Abstract: Dr. Donald Pfister presented faculty seminars on evolution to the UPRM community. The seminars focused on the philosophical and interdisciplinary aspects of evolution. Emphasis was given to an analysis of Darwin's Origin of the species, the concept of evolution, and and the interdisciplinary connections between evolution, cosmology, and belief.
Date Range: 1/18/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


Integration Biology and Science into an interdisciplinary context
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Integration Biology and Science into an interdisciplinary context
Author: Dr. Donald Pfister
Abstract: Selected group of professors discussed integration of biology and science into an interdisciplinary context with other disciplines. This was done in relation to existing formats in various universities, especially how it is implemented in Harvard University. Dr. Donald Pfister is a world-wide recognized authority on evolution and fungi and this seminar formed an integral part of the exploration of what constitutes the beginning of the universe in preparation for offering the interdisciplinary course Cosmology, Evolution, and Beliefs in August of 2014.
Date Range: 1/19/2014
Location: University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus


National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NAACS) 2012 Fall Regional Conference
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NAACS) 2012 Fall Regional Conference
Author: Winona Wynn
Author: Jose Moreno
Abstract: Coordinated and hosted, to enhance our "Somos Indios" grant, the National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies 2012 Fall Regional Conference. Heritage University faculty associated with our NEH grant were able to present their work related to our four NEH "Somos Indios" syllabus themes created for our Native American and Indigenous Studies Academic Program.
Date Range: 10/19/2012-10/20/2012
Location: Heritage University Smith Family Hall, Toppenish, WA
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/AboutHeritage/NAACS2012Conference.aspx
Primary URL Description: Full program and conference presentations listed on this Heritage University site. Friday Program opening statements by Dr. Winona Wynn credited NEH and presented our funded grant program, 'Somos Indios" as a catalyst for hosting the NAACS Conference.


Houston Eats! Texas Gulf Coast Food in the Past, Present, and Future
Grant details: AC-50194-14
Title: Houston Eats! Texas Gulf Coast Food in the Past, Present, and Future
Author: R. Todd Romero
Author: Monica Perales
Abstract: Houston is the most diverse city in the country, a diversity that is reflected in the city’s food. You can eat Pakistani goat biryani, a Colombian empanada, a Uyghur meat pie, Vietnamese bún bò hu?, Viet-Cajun crawfish, Nigerian egusi soup, a cheese enchilada, Gulf oysters and more all in a five-mile radius. Over the course of the two-day conference, historians, farmers, food writers, sociologists, activists, and artists will explore the origins of that diversity, how it impacts the way the city eats now, and what it means for the region’s future. The conference opens Friday, February 2nd with a keynote by Dr. Tyina L. Steptoe, author of Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City, Texan, and associate professor of History at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The event will culminate on the evening of Saturday, February 3rd with a conversation between the Houston Chronicle’s restaurant critic Alison Cook, the winner of three James Beard awards, and two of of Houston’s premier restaurateurs, Sylvia Casares, chef and owner of Sylvia’s Enchilada Kitchen and author of The Enchilada Queen Cookbook, and Kaiser Lashkari, chef and owner of Himalaya Restaurant. Between Friday morning and Saturday evening, attendees will also hear from Houston-raised historian of the Vietnamese immigrant experience Roy Vu and Houston Chronicle barbecue columnist J.C. Reid, and Mikaela Selley, Hispanic Collections Archivist at Houston Metropolitan Research Center, will discuss the history of Mexican restaurants and tortilla factories. This is just a sampling of the many interesting topics and presenters at the conference. The event is free and open to the public. The conference is organized by the Gulf Coast Food Project and Foodways Texas and is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the University of Houston Center for Public History Lecture Series, and the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management.
Date Range: 2/2-2/3/2018
Location: University of Houston


Signs and Symptoms: Medicine is Humanities
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Signs and Symptoms: Medicine is Humanities
Abstract: Our two-day conference is designed to foster cross-disciplinary scholarship and student education in medicine and the humanities. Our conversations will focus on medical narratives and approaches to the pursuit of healing and the applied practice of doctoring. The conference will feature three keynote talks by external speakers, presentations from our medical students, and work from our own faculty. All sessions are open to the public as an outreach to the community.
Date Range: October 13-14, 2016
Location: Unveristy of California, Riverside
Primary URL: http://ideasandsociety.ucr.edu/conferences/signs-symptoms/


Religious Literacy in a Plural Age
Grant details: AC-50213-14
Title: Religious Literacy in a Plural Age
Author: Vincent Biondo
Abstract: Has religious literacy become a necessary component of citizenship? In England and Quebec, the state school curricula have been revised to include religious literacy. Do these programs share successful strategies that can succeed in the U.S.? Faculty experts and doctoral students from diverse disciplines and backgrounds will present on how to improve religious literacy education across ethnic, religious, and partisan lines.
Date Range: July 9, 2016
Location: Harvard University
Primary URL: https://storify.com/lkwert/neh-religious-literacy-in-a-plural-age-conference
Primary URL Description: https://storify.com/lkwert/neh-religious-literacy-in-a-plural-age-conference


conference session - Technologies for the Digital Humanities: Applications and Concerns in 3-Dimensional Scanning of Cultural Heritage
Grant details: AD-50036-12
Title: conference session - Technologies for the Digital Humanities: Applications and Concerns in 3-Dimensional Scanning of Cultural Heritage
Author: Jessie Ryker-Crawford
Author: J. Craig Thompkins
Abstract: The Institute of American Indian Arts was awarded a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities, which culminated in two multi-disciplinary courses for both the Museum Studies and New Media Arts departments. These courses teach students how to 3-D scan cultural objects with laser scanning and photogrammetry techniques. The possibilities through the application of these two techniques for tribal institutions and communities are amazing and ground-breaking, and should be embraced with some care and diligence. For although it will allow our objects to "return" to the communities from which they emerged in order to be utilized in a variety of educational and cultural ways, the dissemination of this data must be carefully guarded as well. This panel will first present the amazing work that the IAIA students have done in scanning the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts' collection pieces, and then will move into a heart-felt discussion on the issues and concerns on how these and other technologies could have upon our cultural property rights. We look forward to fully sharing the 3D scanning techniques in a pre-conference workshop at the IAIA campus, and then we hope to dialogue together in order to be prepared to utilize technology within our own uniquely strong and knowledgeable culturally-based philosophies and ethics.
Date Range: June 10-13, 2013
Location: Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico
Primary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xrzdgsr89yy65uf/2013%20ATALM%20Conference%20NEH.pdf
Primary URL Description: 2013 International Conference of Indigenous Archives, Libraries, and Museums conference program


National Collegiate for Honors Council
Grant details: AE-247973-16
Title: National Collegiate for Honors Council
Abstract: Dean Terry Young and Project Director Angela Wright attended the NCHC conference in Seattle in October 2016 to learn more about setting up an Honors program at Patrick Henry Community College.
Date Range: October 2016
Location: Seattle, Washington
Primary URL: http://http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/nchc.site-ym.com/resource/collection/074ead02-e1b5-4968-8a29-542a4a54f744/Official-Program-2016a.pdf?hhSearchTerms=%222016+and+conference%22
Primary URL Description: The link is for the program for the 2016 conference in Seattle.


High Impact Practices for Developing Ecoliteracy and Civic Action
Grant details: AK-255344-17
Title: High Impact Practices for Developing Ecoliteracy and Civic Action
Author: Denise Mitten (Prescott College)
Author: Emily Shields (Iowa Campus Compact)
Author: Christoffer Lammer-Heindel (Loras College)
Abstract: Dr. Denise Mitten of Prescott College, and Emily Shields, Executive Director of Iowa Campus Compact, examine best practices for engaging students in high impact practices that develop civic engagement and ecoliteracy on the part of students. Introductory remarks by Dr. Christoffer Lammer-Heindel, Loras College. (Eighteen faculty from Loras College and two other area institutions, Clarke University and the University of Dubuque, participated in the workshop.)
Date Range: 09/09/2017
Location: Loras College (Academic Resource Center), 1450 Alta Vista Street, Dubuque, IA 52001
Primary URL: https://buildingecoliteracy.wordpress.com/2017/08/31/workshop/
Primary URL Description: Project webpage announcement.
Secondary URL: https://buildingecoliteracy.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/ecoliteracy_civic-action-workshop-1.pdf
Secondary URL Description: Promotional poster, which was distributed on the Loras College campus and to other area institutions (Clarke University and the University of Dubuque).


Radical Climate Justice and the Humanities (Online Mini-Conference)
Grant details: AK-255344-17
Title: Radical Climate Justice and the Humanities (Online Mini-Conference)
Author: Benjamin Darr, Organizer (Loras College)
Author: Christoffer Lammer-Heindel, Organizer (Loras College)
Author: John Foran, Speaker (UC Santa Barbara)
Author: Ken Hiltner, Speaker (UC Santa Barbara)
Abstract: On November 29 and 30, Loras College will host an online mini-conference, "Radical Climate Justice and the Humanities," featuring John Foran, professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara, and Ken Hiltner, professor of environmental humanities at UC Santa Barbara. The conference is made possible by a Humanities Connections grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Participation is free and open to anyone in the world with internet access.
Date Range: 11/29/2017-11/30/2017
Location: Loras College, 1450 Alta Vista Street, Dubuque, IA 52001
Primary URL: https://climatejusticehumanities.org
Primary URL Description: Webpage for the mini-conference, including free registration.


Common Problem Workshop
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: Common Problem Workshop
Author: Dr. James Liszka
Abstract: Last year a committee at SIUE was awarded National Endowment for the Humanities funds to plan the Digital Community Engagement Pathway, a program for students who will take a set of core courses emphasizing interdisciplinary research and problem-solving methods. The committee has brought in Professor Liszka to share his work on the similarly designed Common Problem Project. The Common Problem Project is a consortium of five State University of New York campuses, and is funded by the National Science Foundation, the State University of New York and Teagle Foundation. The purpose of the project is to promote cross-disciplinary teaching and learning, while developing problem-solving skills and civic engagement in students. Faculty from different disciplines are paired and their relevant, existing classes are coordinated to include a joint project, focused on a problem or problems of common interest. The problem can be either local, regional, or wider still. Students work in cross-disciplinary teams to devise solutions to the problem(s). Community partners and instructors serve as expert sources, but emphasis is placed on the self-direction of the learning in student teams. The talk will give an overview of the pedagogy, practice and logistics of doing common problem projects. Several examples will be used to illustrate the variety of projects and their impact on students and communities, including SUNY Oswego’s “Good Neighbor” project, promoting local business, the “Sustainability in the Schools” project at SUNY Oneonta, involving a collaboration of elementary, secondary, and college students. The “Sustainability and Film” project at SUNY Plattsburgh, and the “Stigma in the Opioid Crisis,” a collaboration among SUNY Queensbury, SUNY Plattsburgh, and Roosevelt University in Chicago. Several other classroom collaborations will be discussed.
Date Range: 03/21/2019
Location: Center for Faculty Development and Innovation at SIUE
Primary URL: http://www.siue.edu/facultycenter/events/2019/03/James_Liszkra_03_21_19.shtml
Primary URL Description: Link to information advertising the workshop.


Digital Community Engagement Pathway Training
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: Digital Community Engagement Pathway Training
Author: Jessica DeSpain
Author: Connie Frey Spurlock
Author: Michael Hankins
Author: Howard Rambsy
Abstract: A three-day workshop to discuss research team methods, teaching courses with African American content, mentoring underserved students, designing service learning assignments, developing community partnerships, teaching students about digital ethics, and integrating digital pedagogies into classroom assignments.
Date Range: 07/22/2018 to 07/24/2018
Location: SIUE's Center for Faculty Development and Innovation
Primary URL: http://www.siue.edu/facultycenter/events/2019/07/dcep_workshops.shtml
Primary URL Description: Website advertising the Pathway training and allowing user registration.


Curricular Innovations at the University of Pittsburgh
Grant details: AKB-260426-18
Title: Curricular Innovations at the University of Pittsburgh
Author: Ruth Mostern
Abstract: As part of a workshop on Curricular Innovations held at the March 2020 Meeting of the National Humanities Alliance, Dr. Mostern shared the Project Team’s experience with introducing interdisciplinary curricular innovations at Pitt, obstacles and solutions to enhancing recruitment, and challenges encountered in cultivating humanities-centered interdisciplinary skills. Grant funds were not used to support this activity.
Date Range: March 8-10, 2020
Location: Washington, D.C.
Primary URL: https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/nhalliance/pages/2059/attachments/original/1583446003/HAD_Program_Final_UPDATED.pdf?1583446003
Primary URL Description: Preliminary Program of the 2020 Annual Meeting of the National Humanities Alliance


The Future of Work in the Age of Automation
Grant details: AQ-248310-16
Title: The Future of Work in the Age of Automation
Author: Organizer: Jon K. Burmeister
Abstract: The relationship between our technologies and our work has always been an intimate one, whether the wooden plow to the ancient farmer or the MRI machine to the neurologist. Yet we now live in an age in which our technologies are advancing so rapidly that their effects on our future working lives are increasingly difficult to predict. While some thinkers argue that we are nearing a future in which automated labor will lead to wide-scale unemployment, others argue that the past trend of technology creating more jobs than it destroys will continue. Either way, in light of the advent of self-driving cars and software that can write news stories, it is prudent for us to consider what technological automation might be able to do for us, what it can never do for us, and how its future developments might impact our daily working lives. This conference will address these themes through the lenses of philosophy, economics, sociology, business, and computer science. The conference will conclude with the three speakers and an additional participant putting their respective disciplinary insights into dialogue, to collectively tackle the question of automation and the future of work. STOKES HALL, S195 (Auditorium) — Campus Map Monday, February 27th 3:15-4:00pm – Dr. Robert Margo (Economics) 4:00-4:45pm – Dr. Juliet Schor (Sociology) 15 minute Break 5:00-5:45pm – Dr. Juliet Floyd (Philosophy) 5:45pm-6:30pm – Panel Discussion: the above speakers along with Dr. William Griffith
Date Range: 2/27/17
Location: Boston College, Stokes Hall S195
Primary URL: https://workandleisure.org/
Primary URL Description: An online resource regarding the question: "Work and Leisure: What are They For?" (including information on the 2/27/17 conference.


Conference: Liberal Arts and the Future of Work and Leisure
Grant details: AQ-248310-16
Title: Conference: Liberal Arts and the Future of Work and Leisure
Author: Jon K. Burmeister
Abstract: *Conference Description* A liberal arts education has always had the ability to transform a student, and thus to transform how they choose to organize their time in adult life: both the time they spend at work and the time they spend at leisure. Yet the factors influencing what sorts of work and what sorts of leisure are available are in a state of increasing flux. From AI-driven automation, to globalization, to infinite entertainment delivered instantly to the palm of your hand, the general conditions of work and leisure are undergoing a radical transformation. In this shifting landscape, what role do the liberal arts have to play? In addition to a liberal education being valuable for its own sake, how can it prepare students for an economy in which whole sectors of work may rapidly shrink or disappear, e.g., through off-shoring or automation? And how can it help students develop the habit of spending their free time well, in the face of endless possibilities for distraction? This conference will seek answers to these questions.
Date Range: Thursday, April 5th, 2018
Location: Boston College, Cushing Hall 001
Primary URL: https://workandleisure.org/#2018conf


Globalizing Scientiae
Grant details: AQ-50223-10
Title: Globalizing Scientiae
Author: J.B. Shank
Author: Carla Nappi
Author: Robert Morrison
Author: Roger Hart
Abstract: Roundtable discussion on global approaches to the history of science at the Scientiae 2015 meeting in Toronto
Date Range: May 2015
Location: Scientiae 2015 meeting, Toronto, CA


Virtue, Happiness, and the Human Good
Grant details: AQ-50371-11
Title: Virtue, Happiness, and the Human Good
Author: Beau Weston and Danilo Petranovich
Abstract: Aristotle says happiness is the highest aim of human life, the only end that is not a means to some other end. Happiness, he argues, is ‘an action of the soul in accordance with virtue.’ How can we live a private life that contributes to our happiness? How can we live a public life that contributes to our happiness? This seminar takes a philosophical and sociological approach to these fundamental questions. Readings are drawn from Aristotle, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Jonathan Haidt. Student will engage in practical exercises and propose projects to enhance happiness.
Date Range: June 1-5, 2015
Location: Yale University
Primary URL: http://www.elminstitute.org/virtue-happiness-and-the-human-good/
Primary URL Description: The seminar is open to advanced undergraduates (including graduating seniors) and graduate students with interests in moral philosophy, ethics, politics, and sociology.


"The Family in Flux: Changing Conceptions of the Family in Theory and Practice"
Grant details: AQ-50833-13
Title: "The Family in Flux: Changing Conceptions of the Family in Theory and Practice"
Author: Marjorie Jolles
Abstract: The family—its purpose, conventions, and importance—is a subject of persistent inquiry in the humanities, and its definition varies notably in central texts of the Western intellectual tradition. In historical and contemporary contexts, the family is construed in remarkably differing ways: as alternately natural and artificial; necessary and unnecessary; rational and irrational; civilizing and corrupting; local and global; and primary and subordinate to the public sphere. As the family is variably defined (and enacted) in different eras of Western thought, so too are concepts of human nature, morality, and the state, for change to the former surely leads to interrogations and re-conceptualizations of the latter, and vice-versa. This seminar will offer an examination of these varying conceptions of family, introduce seminar participants to critical analyses of them, and conclude with a discussion on teaching about the family in both textual representations and personal life.
Date Range: October 3, 2013
Location: Newberry Library, Newberry Teachers' Consortium, Chicago, IL
Primary URL: https://www.newberry.org/10032013-family-flux-changing-conceptions-family-theory-and-practice


Cultural Preservation Today
Grant details: AQ-50920-13
Title: Cultural Preservation Today
Author: Gerry Canavan
Author: Julia Hell
Author: George Steinmetz
Author: John Patrick Leary
Author: Stephen Small
Abstract: “Cultural Preservation Today” will be a one-day symposium sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, held in the Raynor Beaumier Suite BC at the Raynor Library on Friday, March 27, 2015 from 10-3 PM. The program will consist of two sessions, each discussing problems and issues facing contemporary efforts to preserve culture. In session one, from 10-12 PM, Dr. John Patrick Leary (Wayne State) and Dr. George Steinmetz (Michigan) will discuss “Ruins & the City,” focusing on ruin photography in post-industrial cities like Milwaukee and Detroit, and the sorts of cultural narratives that now come out of these sites of memory. In session two, from 1-3 PM, “Remembering Things That Are Hard to Remember,” Dr. Julia Hell (Michigan) and Dr. Stephen Small (Berkeley) will discuss the memorialization of historical events, like slavery, war, and the Holocaust. Both sessions will use a “workshop” format, with each speaker speaking for approximately half an hour, followed by breakout groups and Q&A. Attendance at both sessions is not required. The event is sponsored by an “Enduring Questions” grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and is the culminating event of two years of the special topics course made possible by the grant, ENGL 4931: “Cultural Preservation.” Students, faculty, and staff interested in attending the event should contact Dr. Gerry Canavan (English) at gerry.canavan@marquette.edu for registration information. Both sessions are free of charge, and a light lunch will provided for attendees in the middle.
Date Range: March 27, 2015
Location: Marquette University
Primary URL: https://mucp2015.wordpress.com/symposium/
Primary URL Description: descriptive webpage


"Fully Engaged" - An eight-session discussion series on work, leisure and integrity
Grant details: AQ-50954-13
Title: "Fully Engaged" - An eight-session discussion series on work, leisure and integrity
Author: Daniel Ritchie
Abstract: A small group discussion series, during the 2014-15 academic year, designed for business professionals looking for more holistic forms of engagement in life and work. Our readings take us deep into the social, intellectual, and personal challenges that great writers and leaders have posed. As we discuss their meaning for our families, vocations, and culture, we'll seek to lead more fully engaged lives.
Date Range: September 2014 - May 2015
Primary URL: https://www.bethel.edu/events/2015/fully-engaged
Secondary URL Description: Bethel University


“A philosophical perspective: the nature and implications of moral injury”
Grant details: AV-255496-17
Title: “A philosophical perspective: the nature and implications of moral injury”
Author: Edward Barrett
Abstract: None available.
Date Range: May 14, 2018
Location: Euro-International Society for Military Ethics


Veteran Art Summit (National Veterans Art Museum Veteran Art Summit at the Chicago Cultural Center)
Grant details: AV-260608-18
Title: Veteran Art Summit (National Veterans Art Museum Veteran Art Summit at the Chicago Cultural Center)
Author: National Veterans Art Museum
Author: University of Illinois at Chicago Museum and Exhibition Studies program
Author: DePaul Art Museum
Author: Chicago Cultural Center (City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events)
Author: Richard Harris Collection
Author: National Endowment for the Humanities
Abstract: The Veteran Art Summit, held May 3–5, 2019, brought together over fifty veteran artists from across the United States, with the intention of strengthening the veteran art movement. It offered opportunities for veteran artists to learn from their peers, collaborate, network, and explore what it means to be an artist and a veteran today.
Date Range: May 3, 2019 - May 5, 2019
Location: Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E Washington St, Chicago, IL 60602
Primary URL: https://www.nvam.org/nvam-triennial--summit.html
Secondary URL: https://www.chicago.gov/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/war_survival.html


Rendezvous with Death: A Century of War Poetry by Veterans (National Veterans Art Museum Triennial Literature Component)
Grant details: AV-260608-18
Title: Rendezvous with Death: A Century of War Poetry by Veterans (National Veterans Art Museum Triennial Literature Component)
Author: Kevin Basl
Abstract: The Triennial Literature Component “Rendezvous with Death: A Century of War Poetry by Veterans” demonstrated how veterans have influenced American poetry over the past century. It included twelve poems, contextual essays and discussion questions for students and reading groups.
Date Range: 2019
Location: Chicago Cultural Center
Primary URL: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58e2f18320099efd033cb97b/t/5d057b77498dca0001d0e261/1560640398741/Resource-Guide-4d-Final-3-web.pdf
Primary URL Description: National Veterans Art Museum Triennial and Veteran Art Summit On War and Survival Resource Guide
Secondary URL: https://www.nvam.org/nvam-triennial--summit.html
Secondary URL Description: National Veterans Art Museum Triennial website


Return to the Body (National Veterans Art Museum Triennial Performance Program)
Grant details: AV-260608-18
Title: Return to the Body (National Veterans Art Museum Triennial Performance Program)
Author: Carlos Sirah
Abstract: The Triennial Performance Program “Return to the Body” presented the work of eight veterans who utilize the body and performance to examine the complex and shifting narratives of identity, militarism, and personal and collective histories of resistance and survival.
Date Range: May 3, 2019 - May 5, 2019
Location: Chicago Cultural Center 78 E Washington St, Chicago, IL
Primary URL: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58e2f18320099efd033cb97b/t/5d057b77498dca0001d0e261/1560640398741/Resource-Guide-4d-Final-3-web.pdf
Primary URL Description: National Veterans Art Museum Triennial and Veteran Art Summit On War and Survival Resource Guide
Secondary URL: https://www.nvam.org/nvam-triennial--summit.htm
Secondary URL Description: National Veterans Art Museum Triennial website


Five Tribes Story Conference
Grant details: BC-50531-10
Title: Five Tribes Story Conference
Author: Five Civilized Tribes Museum
Abstract: “One of the goals of the Five Tribes Story Conference is to establish a sense of family among participants and attendees until the rolls are blurred” stated Co-host Tim Tingle in his opening remarks. The intent of the conference was to merge practice and theory in the interpretation of folklore, oral tradition, scholarship and literature of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole Tribes. The goal was to provide an enriching Southeastern Tribal environment, joining academic, interpretive, literary, art and performance disciplines. Cultural presentations, literary readings and panel discussions were followed by questions from the audience. The Five Tribes Story Conference serves as an inspirational springboard for working and future writers, poets, film-makers, painters and musicians. In addition to enjoying the visual arts, attendees had the opportunity to hear “stories-behind-the-stories” told by modern heroes of the Indian world. Evening concerts were a strong reflection of the conference goals by including authors, poets, musicians, language instructors, and storytellers portraying their common pursuit of conveying the Five Tribes stories. Ideas discussed during the day were brought to life with the evening performances.
Date Range: September 16-17, 2011
Location: Bacone College, Muskogee, Oklahoma


Lecture and Master Class - New Duke
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Lecture and Master Class - New Duke
Abstract: Music for Youth and Pequot Library presented Brian Torff and the New Duke Ensemble at their Young Persons’ Concert Series on Oct 24th The room was full of enthusiastic Jazz students from local Middle and High schools. Students also came from the Greater Bridgeport Youth Orchestra Jazz Band. It was a wonderful afternoon of music with Brian leading us through the evolution of his original compositions and giving us a history of jazz and blues. The program continued with a master class featuring student ensembles and soloists who were able to get one on one and small group sectional support. The artists enthusiastically reached out to each student giving them guidance, technical support and professional coaching. The students were grateful for this unique opportunity. The master class program ended with all students learning and jamming the C Jam Blues with New Duke Ensemble. It was the perfect way to end the master class. We appreciated the opportunity to feature Brian Torff and the New Duke Ensemble at our Young Persons’ Concert Series and can’t thank the band enough for their wonderful work with our master class students.
Date Range: 10/24/2015
Location: Pequot Library, Southport, CT


Poetry Conference by the Sea
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Poetry Conference by the Sea
Abstract: New Duke will be appearing tomorrow at Poetry by the Sea: A Global Conference, will take place from 12 p.m. Tuesday May 26 to 3 p.m. Friday May 29th at The Mercy by the Sea Center, Madison, Connecticut. The 2015 keynote speaker will be Marilyn Hacker. The farewell concert will feature contemporary jazz ensemble New Duke. Visit our faculty page to check out descriptions of workshops and seminars, and meet our world-class faculty. In addition, we have the centenary of Margaret Walker, the tenth anniversary of Mezzo Cammin, a tribute to Claudia Emerson, and panels & readings with speakers such as Robert Polito, Marilyn Nelson, Afaa Michael Weaver, Jill Bialosky, Herman Beavers, Moira Egan, Damiano Abeni, Quincy R. Lehr and many more.
Date Range: 05/26/2015
Location: Madison, CT
Primary URL: http://www.poetrybytheseaconference.com/schedule.htm


Essentially Ellington
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Essentially Ellington
Author: Chris Behrens
Abstract: The Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival is an annual high school jazz festival and competition that takes place every May at Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) in New York City. The festival is aimed at encouraging young musicians to play music by Duke Ellington and other various jazz artists.[1] All festival events are housed at JALC's Frederick P. Rose Hall. The current festival director is Wynton Marsalis, renowned jazz trumpeter and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center.
Date Range: May 2015
Location: Jazz at Lincoln Center
Primary URL: http://academy.jazz.org/ee/


Essentially Ellington
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Essentially Ellington
Author: Chris Behrens
Abstract: The Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival is an annual high school jazz festival and competition that takes place every May at Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) in New York City. The festival is aimed at encouraging young musicians to play music by Duke Ellington and other various jazz artists.[1] All festival events are housed at JALC's Frederick P. Rose Hall. The current festival director is Wynton Marsalis, renowned jazz trumpeter and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center.
Date Range: May 2016
Location: Jazz at Lincoln Center
Primary URL: http://academy.jazz.org/ee/


Writing Our Lives
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Writing Our Lives
Author: Bryan Crandall
Abstract: At the Writing Our Lives-Digital Ubuntu conference students shared original works in formats ranging from TED Talks and web mapping to written pieces published on WordPress or BlogSpot. “The projects were outstanding,” noted Crandall. “It was a day where students shared their writing beyond traditional classroom boundaries. They wrote radio plays and political speeches. They designed talks for the stage and stories about their neighborhoods. More importantly, they interacted with young people from other zip codes and questioned the stereotypes of one another’s community. Young people have a tremendous amount of power when writing together.”
Date Range: 5/22/2015
Location: Fairfield, CT
Primary URL: http://educatorinnovator.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/5_22_15_Digital_Ubuntu_Program.pdf


Schomburg Summer Education Institute: Encouters with Race in American Art
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Schomburg Summer Education Institute: Encouters with Race in American Art
Author: Yohuru WIlliams
Abstract: July 18th - 22nd, 2016 | 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Join hundreds of K-16 educators and premier scholars from across the country for a spectacular “education vacation” at the Schomburg Center featuring lectures, interactive workshops, curriculum labs, curator talks and community walks that explore the history and cultures of African Americans and African peoples throughout the Diaspora. Educators will gain valuable content knowledge and learn inquiry-based approaches to teaching across the grades using the Schomburg’s rich primary resource collections on-site and online.
Date Range: 07/21/2016
Location: Schomburg Institute, New York City
Primary URL: https://www.nypl.org/help/about-nypl/fellowships-institutes/black-history-360


Schomburg Summer Education Institute: Hip Hop Revolution: The Culture and Politics of Rap
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Schomburg Summer Education Institute: Hip Hop Revolution: The Culture and Politics of Rap
Author: Yohuru WIlliams
Abstract: July 18th - 22nd, 2016 | 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Join hundreds of K-16 educators and premier scholars from across the country for a spectacular “education vacation” at the Schomburg Center featuring lectures, interactive workshops, curriculum labs, curator talks and community walks that explore the history and cultures of African Americans and African peoples throughout the Diaspora. Educators will gain valuable content knowledge and learn inquiry-based approaches to teaching across the grades using the Schomburg’s rich primary resource collections on-site and online. @SchomburgEd #blackhistory360
Date Range: 07/25/2016
Primary URL: https://www.nypl.org/help/about-nypl/fellowships-institutes/black-history-360


Annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thons
Grant details: CH-50371-07
Title: Annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thons
Author: Heather Slania
Abstract: NMWA has held annual Wikipedia Edit-a-thons for Women's History Month since 2012.
Date Range: 2012-Present
Location: National Museum of Women in the Arts


The Great War and the Northern Plains, 1914-2014 (46th Annual Dakota Conference)
Grant details: CH-50657-09
Title: The Great War and the Northern Plains, 1914-2014 (46th Annual Dakota Conference)
Author: Harry F. Thompson
Abstract: The 46th Annual Dakota Conference examined the impact on the Northern Plains of World War I. More than 70 presentations were made, and 240 attended.
Date Range: 4/25-26/2014
Location: Center for Western Studies, Augustana College, Sioux Falls, SD
Primary URL: http://www.augie.edu/cws


Where the West Begins? Geography, Identity, and Promise (47th Annual Dakota Conference)
Grant details: CH-50657-09
Title: Where the West Begins? Geography, Identity, and Promise (47th Annual Dakota Conference)
Author: Harry F. Thompson
Abstract: The 47th Dakota Conference examined such issues as geography, identity, and promise related to the Midwest, Great Plains, and West. More than 70 presentations were made, and 240 people attended.
Date Range: 4/24-25/2015
Location: Center for Western Studies, Augustana College, Sioux Falls, SD
Primary URL: http://www.augie.edu/cws


"Fields of Vision: The Material and Visual Culture of New England, 1600-1830"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Fields of Vision: The Material and Visual Culture of New England, 1600-1830"
Author: Martha J. McNamara, Wellesley College
Author: Georgia B. Barnhill, AAS
Abstract: Given the explosion of scholarship in cultural history over the past twenty-five years, what now is the place of objects in the study of the past? What role do material and visual culture studies play in scholarly conversations that range over topics as diverse as race, sexuality, gender, nationalism, ethnicity, power and global interaction? In turn, in the face of increasingly trans-national scholarship in early America what can we gain from attention paid to a single region and its artifacts?
Date Range: 2007
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.chavic.org/Pastconferences2007.htm
Primary URL Description: Conference schedule and participants


"Home, School, Play, Work: The Visual and Textual Worlds of Children"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Home, School, Play, Work: The Visual and Textual Worlds of Children"
Author: Patricia Crain, New York University, Chair
Abstract: Papers addressed aspects of eighteenth and nineteenth-century textual, visual, or material culture that related to the experience or representation of childhood.
Date Range: 2008
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.chavic.org/Pastconferences2008.htm
Primary URL Description: Conference brochure


"Destined for Men: Visual Materials for Male Audiences, 1750-1880"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Destined for Men: Visual Materials for Male Audiences, 1750-1880"
Author: Joshua Brown, executive director of the American Social History Project, located in the Graduate Cen
Abstract: Through the emergence of women's studies programs in academic institutions in the past generation or two, many aspects of women’s lives have been documented through publications and academic courses. The third conference of the Center for Historic American Visual Culture focuses not on women but on men. Looking at examples of visual materials of and for men is a way to look at a different gendered audience. In the literature on American graphic materials, little has been written about the audience for historical images. The papers presented at this conference begin to address this need.
Date Range: 2009
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.chavic.org/Pastconferences2009.htm
Primary URL Description: Conference brochure


"History Prints: Fact and Fiction”
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "History Prints: Fact and Fiction”
Author: Mark Thistlethwaite, Professor of art history, TCU, an authority on history painting
Abstract: One question that often surfaces about historical prints is the accuracy of images. Did makers of nineteenth-century city view portray cities as they actually were? Do history prints present myths or truth? How often did print publishers gloss over reality to present heroism or an optimistic view of society? The Fourth CHAViC Conference seeks to address some of these questions among others. The presentations by scholars from a variety of disciplines addressed American identity consumption of historical prints, reform prints, artistic license, the exchange of imagery between America and Europe, the distribution of urban imagery on Staffordshire pottery, and presidential portraiture.
Date Range: 2010
Primary URL: http://www.chavic.org/Pastconferences2010.htm
Primary URL Description: Conference brochure


"Interpreting Historical Images for Teaching & Research"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Interpreting Historical Images for Teaching & Research"
Author: David Jaffee, professor of early American history and material culture at the Bard Graduate Center f
Abstract: This seminar enabled participants to take advantage of the AAS collection of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century prints, maps, sheet music covers, and ephemera of all kinds. There were guided tutorials as well as hands-on explorations of a topic of specific interest. Topics included colonial prints, antebellum images of Native Americans, western landscape photography, chromolithography, and the etching revival. Participants were able to pursue research in the AAS collection as a part of the seminar.
Date Range: 2009
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.chavic.org/Pastseminar2009.htm
Primary URL Description: Seminar description on AAS website


"Interpreting Historical Images for Teaching & Research"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Interpreting Historical Images for Teaching & Research"
Author: David Jaffee, professor of early American history and material culture at the Bard Graduate Center f
Abstract: Sessions at this summer seminar will focus on the history of print production in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; interpreting portrait paintings, prints, and photographs; "reading" illustrations in popular journals; and related topics. Participants will also have access to the Society's varied collections of visual materials to pursue their own interests.
Date Range: June 20-25, 2010
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.americanantiquarian.org/chavicsummer2010.htm
Primary URL Description: Seminar description on AAS website


"Picturing Reform: How Images Transformed America, 1830-1880"
Grant details: CH-50824-11
Title: "Picturing Reform: How Images Transformed America, 1830-1880"
Author: Louis P. Masur, the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of American Institutions and Values at Trinity C
Abstract: Sessions at this summer seminar will focus on the history of print production in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; interpreting portrait paintings, prints, and photographs; "reading" illustrations in popular journals; and related topics.
Date Range: June 19-24, 2011
Location: Worcester, MA
Primary URL: http://www.americanantiquarian.org/chavicsummer2011.htm
Primary URL Description: Seminar description on AAS website


Conference: Educating Harlem: Histories of Teaching and Learning in a 20th Century Community
Grant details: CH-50926-12
Title: Conference: Educating Harlem: Histories of Teaching and Learning in a 20th Century Community
Author: Ansley Erickson, Assistant Professor, Program in History and Education, Columbia Teachers College
Author: Ernest Morrell, Professor of Education, Director IUME, Columbia Teachers College
Abstract: A public conference, presenting new research by scholars from across the country about the history of education and community in 20th century Harlem. The conference was organized by Ansley Erickson and Ernest Morrell, co-directors of Educating Harlem, in collaboration with the Institute of Minority and Urban Education, the Center on History and Education, and the Program in History and Education at Teachers College.
Date Range: 10/02/2014
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University.
Primary URL: http://https://researchblogs.cul.columbia.edu/educatingharlem/lecture-series/
Primary URL Description: Conference page of the website of Educating Harlem. The conference agenda may be viewed here.
Secondary URL: http://http://www.tc.columbia.edu/che/
Secondary URL Description: Website of the Teachers College Center on History and Education, which notes all events in collaboration with Educating Harlem.


Educating Harlem: Histories of Teaching and Learning in an American Community
Grant details: CH-50926-12
Title: Educating Harlem: Histories of Teaching and Learning in an American Community
Author: Ernest Morrell, Professor of Education, English Education, Director of IUME, Teachers College
Author: Ansley Erickson, Assistant Professor of Education, History and Education, Columbia Teachers College
Abstract: A conference for scholars from across the country engaged in works-in-progress about the history of education and community in 20th Century Harlem. Educating Harlem is a project organized in collaboration with the Institute for Urban and Minority Education, the Center on History and Education, and the Program in History and Education at Columbia Teachers College, to investigate the history of education, broadly defined, in that community.
Date Range: October 10-11, 2013
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University
Primary URL: http://https://researchblogs.cul.columbia.edu/educatingharlem/conference/conference2013/
Primary URL Description: Conference page of the website of Educating Harlem: Histories of Learning and Schooling in an American Community. A description of the conference and call for papers may be viewed here.
Secondary URL: http://events in collaboration with Educating Harlem. http://www.tc.columbia.edu/che/
Secondary URL Description: Website of the Teachers College Center on History and Education, which notes all events in collaboration with Educating Harlem.


Think Tank on Historical Illiteracy
Grant details: CH-50926-12
Title: Think Tank on Historical Illiteracy
Author: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library
Author: Teachers College Center on History and Education
Abstract: The Teachers College Center on History and Education and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture convened a group of historians and educators to address the issue of growing historical illiteracy among K-12 learners. Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, gave opening remarks. The discussion that followed, which was video recorded, elaborated on the role historical literacy plays in challenging American social and economic inequality. Participants identified the local level as the entry point for engaging young learners in the study of history as it matters to the quality of their lives and communities.
Date Range: February 2, 2014
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University
Primary URL: http://www.tc.columbia./che/
Primary URL Description: Teachers College Center on History and Education website. Video recording of the think tank is available on the site.


Historical Literacy Matters: Developing Civic Capacity in Learners
Grant details: CH-50926-12
Title: Historical Literacy Matters: Developing Civic Capacity in Learners
Author: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library
Author: Teachers College Center on History and Education
Author: New York City Department of Education, Department of Social Studies
Abstract: Cosponsored professional development day for New York City public high school teachers. The daylong event explored the meaning of historical literacy and examined inquiry-based teaching models for the high school classroom. Presentations by scholars, open dialogue with event participants, and breakout sessions addressed the construction of the American historical narrative, archival research and the politics of the historical record, and how historical literacy matters as a foundation for the development of engaged civic participation in learners.
Date Range: February 1, 2016
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University.
Primary URL: http://tc.columbia/che/
Primary URL Description: Website of the Center on History and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Secondary URL: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/historical-literacy-matters-developing-civic-capacity-in-learners-registration-1996704898
Secondary URL Description: Secondary URL is for Eventbrite. The announcement of and registration for the event was organized by the NYC Department of Education, Social Studies Department and posted on Eventbrite.


Reading Buildings/Reading History: Integrating Literacy Skills through Historical Building Analysis
Grant details: CH-50926-12
Title: Reading Buildings/Reading History: Integrating Literacy Skills through Historical Building Analysis
Author: Christina Dobbs, Clinical Assistant Professor, English Education, Boston University
Author: Christine Baron, Assistant Professor,Program in Social Studies Education, Teachers College, CU
Abstract: While many social studies and language arts teachers use close reading strategies with documents to develop historical thinking, traditional texts often serve as a barrier for students who struggle with reading, particularly non-native English speakers or students with language-based learning disabilities. In this workshop, practicing classroom teachers learned how to develop historical thinking skills through the analysis of historical buildings. Drawing on literacy theory and practice, the workshop demonstrated how the process of historical building analysis supports students' development of higher order thinking skills and meets Common Core State Standards.
Date Range: October 17 and 23, 2015
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University
Primary URL: http://tc. columbia.edu/che/
Primary URL Description: Website for Center on History and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Secondary URL: http://http://www.tc.columbia.edu/continuing-professional-studies/conferences-programs-workshops/all-offerings/reading-buildings/
Secondary URL Description: Website for Office of Continuing Professional Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University. The office handled the promotion of and registration for the workshop.


Outside the Kaiserreich: The German Diaspora in the World War I Era
Grant details: CH-50975-13
Title: Outside the Kaiserreich: The German Diaspora in the World War I Era
Author: Cora Lee Kluge
Author: Mark Louden
Author: Werner Sollors
Author: Walter Kamphoefner
Author: Felecia Lucht
Author: Sarah Panter
Author: Pamela Potter
Author: Julie Allen
Author: Stefan Manz
Author: Winson Chu
Author: Weijia Li
Author: Duane Stolzfus
Abstract: In October 2015, the Max Kade Institute organized a three-day interdisciplinary symposium to look at the complex situations and dynamics of societies with German populations on the periphery or outside the borders of the German Empire at a time of global armed conflict. Presentations addressed questions of ethnic, national, and personal identity; concepts of loyalty and duty; different political reactions to ethnic minorities in different countries; interactions among different ethnic minorities; language maintenance and language shift; the effects of the war on religious and cultural traditions; rural and urban divides; and other topics. The event was free and open to the public. It was held at the Max Kade Institute/ University Club and the University Pyle Center
Date Range: October 8 -10, 2015
Location: Max Kade Institute, University Club and Pyle Center, University of Wisconsin Madison
Primary URL: http://mki.wisc.edu/content/their-own-words-german-americans-world-war-i-era
Primary URL Description: "Outside the Kaiserreich: The German Diaspora in the World War I Era" event page, including program and schedule.


People of Faith, Languages of Tradition: Germanic Heritage Languages among Christians and Jews
Grant details: CH-50975-13
Title: People of Faith, Languages of Tradition: Germanic Heritage Languages among Christians and Jews
Author: Mark L. Louden
Author: Heinrich Siemens
Author: Christopher Cox
Author: Jürg Fleischer
Author: Miriam Isaacs
Author: Joshua Brown
Author: Lynn Marcus Miller
Author: Steven Hartman Kaiser
Author: Tony Waldner
Author: Guido Seiler
Author: Henry Sapoznik
Author: Sunny Yudkoff
Abstract: Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken around the world today, more than half are likely to no longer be spoken actively by the turn of the next century. In almost every case, these languages are spoken by groups of people, often indigenous, who are minorities in the larger societies in which they live. There are, however, a small group of minority languages that are not endangered and which in fact are enjoying robust vitality. In North America there are four such languages, which are spoken in conservative Christian and Jewish religious communities: Pennsylvania Dutch (Amish and Old Order Mennonites); Mennonite Low German (Old Colony Mennonites); Hutterite German (Hutterites); and Yiddish (Haredi Jews). The growth of these groups is exponential due to the twin factors of high birth rates and low attrition, thereby ensuring the sociolinguistic health of the languages they speak. This symposium will bring together an international group of researchers specializing in these languages with Amish, Mennonite, Hutterite, and Haredi community members to explore sociolinguistic aspects of the social-spiritual identities of these faith groups. On Thursday evening, March 30, the symposium will open with a panel discussion of community members moderated by MKI Director Mark Louden, followed by a reception. (University Club) Friday morning and afternoon and Saturday morning will feature 45-minute presentations by the invited speakers. (Pyle Center) On Friday evening, we will have a reading of literary works in the four languages that evoke the themes of the symposium. English translations will be projected onto a screen for the benefit of the attendees. (Pyle Center)
Date Range: March 30 - April 1, 2017
Location: UW-Madison Campus: Max Kade Institute, University Club, Pyle Center
Primary URL: http://https://mki.wisc.edu/events/2017/people-faith-languages-tradition-germanic-heritage-languages-among-christians-and-jews
Primary URL Description: Conference URL with links to program and abstracts


Should America Promote Democracy Abroad?
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Should America Promote Democracy Abroad?
Author: Zalmay Khalilzad
Author: Elliott Abrams
Author: Nicholas Burns
Author: John Agresto
Author: Karan Bhatia
Author: Danya Greenfield
Author: James Zogby
Author: Al Hunt
Author: Judy Woodruff
Author: Scott Carpenter
Author: Anthony Cordesman
Author: Charles Kesler
Author: Michael O'Hanlon
Author: Tony Smith
Author: Nadia Diuk
Author: Morton Halperin
Author: Adam Przeworski
Author: John D. Sullivan
Author: Les Campbell
Author: Tom Garrett
Author: Melinda Haring
Author: David Kramer
Author: Jamila Raqib
Author: Larry Diamond
Abstract: Held over the course of three days, the conference took place on the Kenyon campus in Gambier, Ohio, and involved broad student, faculty, and campus participation. The conference included public panels and private discussions, with participants from a variety of fields: journalists, academics from a variety of disciplines, political actors, policy analysts, and representatives of non-governmental organizations involved in the work of democratization. Panels looked at the political, economic, and social aspects of democracy, as well as how or to what extent the promotion of democracy coheres with the principles and values of the United States. While recent developments in the Middle East made the conference topic timely, panelists considered a broad spectrum of regions and questions, including: What are the prospects for democracy in the Middle East, after the Arab Spring? Is it in America's national security interest to promote democracy abroad? What can we learn from experiences with democracy promotion outside the Middle East? What are the underpinnings or prerequisites of successful liberal democracies? What are the practical impediments to the further spread of democracy?
Date Range: April 12-14, 2012
Location: Kenyon College, Gambier, OH
Primary URL: http://www.kenyon.edu/x58399.xml
Primary URL Description: Conference overview with links to videos and speaker biographies, as well as schedule of events.


The Politics of Economic Inequality conference welcome
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: The Politics of Economic Inequality conference welcome
Author: Senator Sherrod Brown
Abstract: Senator Sherrod Brown's video message, kicking off the Center for the Study of American Democracy's 2014 conference, "The Politics of Economic Inequality."
Date Range: 4/8/14
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiQE45gp2nU


The Politics of Economic Inequality conference welcome
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: The Politics of Economic Inequality conference welcome
Author: Senator Rob Portman
Abstract: Senator Rob Portman's video message, kicking of the Center for the Study of American Democracy's 2014 conference, The Politics of Economic Inequality.
Date Range: 4/8/14
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atXxyVYZn5Q


Douglas Holtz-Eakin: Keynote Address, The Politics of Economic Inequality
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Douglas Holtz-Eakin: Keynote Address, The Politics of Economic Inequality
Author: Douglas Holtz-Eakin
Abstract: Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former Director of the Congressional Budget Office and chief economic policy adviser to McCain presidential campaign. Introduced by Sean Decatur, President of Kenyon College
Date Range: 4/9/14
Location: Kenyon College
Primary URL: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7106882/CSADopen
Primary URL Description: Center for the Study of American Democracy Video of Holtz-Eakin keynote address


Panel: Public Policy and Inequality; The Politics of Economic In
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Panel: Public Policy and Inequality; The Politics of Economic In
Author: William Galston
Author: Suzy Khimm
Author: Ross Eisenbrey
Author: Scott Winship
Abstract: Panel: Public Policy and Inequality 9:15am, Gund Gallery Community Foundation Theater William Galston, Brookings Institution Suzy Khimm, MSNBC Ross Eisenbrey, Economic Policy Institute Scott Winship, Manhattan Institute Moderated by David Rowe, Professor of Political Science Each panelist spoke about their perspectives on inequality—is it something we should be concerned about, what is the evidence, and what is the relationship between economic growth and inequality? Public policies, such as immigration reform and the tax code, illustrated some areas where common ground might be found.
Date Range: 4/10/14
Location: Kenyon College
Primary URL: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7106882/CSADpanel1
Primary URL Description: Video of Public Policy and Inequality panel at Center for Study of American Democracy conference.


Robert Putnam: Inequality of Opportunity; The Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Robert Putnam: Inequality of Opportunity; The Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Author: Robert Putnam
Abstract: "Inequality of Opportunity" • Robert Putnam, Harvard University • Introduced by Max Rappoport (’14) In his Wall Street Journal (April 15, 2014) column, “A Bipartisan Consensus on Income Inequality?” William Galston thoughtfully summarized Robert Putnam’s speech. He wrote that Putnam “spoke movingly about the differences between growing up in securely middle-class families and in families living on the edge of poverty.” Galston added: “It was impossible to come away from Mr. Putnam's talk believing that America's children enjoy anything like equal opportunity to succeed. But one could have reached a similar conclusion—and many did—from Charles Murray's 2012 book Coming Apart, which chronicled the decline of the white working class. Messrs. Murray and Putnam disagree on both diagnosis and prescription: Mr. Murray emphasizes cultural change as a reason for the decline, Mr. Putnam the collapse of the industrial economy. But on the level of describing the gap between top and bottom—qualitative and quantitative—they largely agree. In a country that cares about opportunity, that agreement matters.” This talk was the most popular of all the conference sessions
Date Range: 4/10/14
Location: Kenyon College


Panel: Global Perspectives on Inequality; The Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Panel: Global Perspectives on Inequality; The Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Author: Branko Milanovic
Author: Charles Horner
Author: Ben White
Abstract: Panel: Global Perspectives on Inequality • Branko Milanovic, City University of New York • Charles Horner, Hudson Institute • Ben White (‘94), Politico • Moderated by Jan Thomas, Associate Provost and Professor of Sociology The panel addressed a range of global economic topics, including the gap between rich and poor countries, the rise of China’s middle class, as well as how economic policies in the U.S., such as free trade agreements, affect other economies around the world. Attendance: 80.
Date Range: 4/10/14
Location: Kenyon College
Primary URL: http://http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7106882/CSADpanel2
Primary URL Description: Video of panel discussion, Center for the Study of American Democracy


Panel: Public Narratives about Inequality; The Politics of Economic Inequality
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Panel: Public Narratives about Inequality; The Politics of Economic Inequality
Author: Ross Douthat
Author: Jim Tankersley
Author: Lizzie O'Leary
Abstract: Panel: Public Narratives about Inequality • Ross Douthat, New York Times • Jim Tankersley, Washington Post • Lizzie O’Leary, Marketplace • Moderated by Jay Corrigan, Professor of Economics This standing-room-only panel event highlighted challenges of reporting on economic inequality—from the concern that politicians dictate the terms of the debate to the depth of coverage. Douthat, for example, noted that narratives told about individual experiences with poverty don’t always discuss other ways that individuals are helped, such as the lowered costs of goods. Attendance: 150.
Date Range: 4/10/14
Location: Kenyon College
Primary URL: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7106882/CSADjournalists
Primary URL Description: Video of panel discussion, Center for the Study of American Democracy


Austan Goolsbee: Inequality and the Market; keynote address at the Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Grant details: CZ-50173-08
Title: Austan Goolsbee: Inequality and the Market; keynote address at the Politics of Economic Inequality conference
Author: Austan Goolsbee
Abstract: "Inequality and the Market" • Austan Goolsbee, University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers to President Obama • Introduced by Eleanor Ritchie (‘14) As a counterpoint to the Holz-Eakin talk the night before, Goolsbee argued that income inequality does exist and that government should intervene through such measures as education support, infrastructure investment, and tax reforms, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit. Both Goolsbee and Holtz-Eakin served as advisors to presidential candidates during 2008 and frequently faced each other on talk shows, making for a lively contrast in both talks. Attendance: 350.
Date Range: 4/10/14
Location: Kenyon College
Primary URL: http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7106882/CSADgoolsbee
Primary URL Description: Video of Austan Goolsbee keynote address; Center for the Study of American Democracy


The Worlds of Thaddeus Stevens & James Buchanan: Race, Gender, & Politics in the Civil War Era
Grant details: CZ-50206-09
Title: The Worlds of Thaddeus Stevens & James Buchanan: Race, Gender, & Politics in the Civil War Era
Abstract: The Symposium will use both Congressman Stevens and President Buchanan as unique lenses through which to examine nineteenth-century political history with an in-depth look at party formation and re-formation; slavery, race and Civil Rights; and the shifting role of gender in nineteenth-century politics. Through the exploration and discussion of these issues, participants will gain a broader understanding of how social mores, geographic borders, and place influenced the policies and politicians of the United States in the critical years leading up to and following the Civil War.
Date Range: September 18-19, 2015
Location: Lancaster Campus of History, Lancaster PA
Primary URL: http://lancasterhistory.org/events/president-james-buchanan-national-symposium
Primary URL Description: Symposium home page, from which a brochure may be downloaded and schedule viewed.


STEAMed Rice 2015
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: STEAMed Rice 2015
Author: Eliza Reilly, expert presenter
Abstract: STEaM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, arts, and Math. The STEaM Events at Montgomery College are designed to explore the intersection of STEM fields with the humanities through different topics. "Exploring the Intersection between STEM and Humanities Through Food occured Friday, March 27, 2015. Pairs of faculty (one STEM, one Humanities) served as table leaders. Each pair chose a topic related to Food, STEM and the Humanities. This pair of faculty facilitated discussion on the selected topic with the attendees at their table.
Date Range: Friday, March 27, 2015
Location: Montgomery College, MD
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=80074
Primary URL Description: STEAMed Rice 2015


Humanities Days 2014
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Humanities Days 2014
Abstract: Humanities Days is a collaboration with other entities and many individual faculty and staff at Montgomery College to bring to each campus a film series and a full day of presentations and workshops. Humanities Days events culminate in a capstone event featuring a distinguished speaker and a performance.
Date Range: October 20-24, 2014
Location: Montgomery College, MD
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/globalhumanities/humanities-day/
Primary URL Description: Humanities Days


Humanities Days 2013
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Humanities Days 2013
Abstract: Humanities Days is a collaboration with other entities and many individual faculty and staff at Montgomery College to bring to each campus a film series and a full day of presentations and workshops. Humanities Days events culminate in a capstone event featuring a distinguished speaker and a performance.
Date Range: October 16-17, 2013
Location: Montgomery College, MD
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/globalhumanities/humanities-day/
Primary URL Description: Humanities Days


Memorandum of Understanding with Xian University
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Memorandum of Understanding with Xian University
Author: Global Humanities Institute, Montgomery College
Author: Xian University, China
Abstract: In September 2013, Dr. DeRionne Pollard, Montgomery College president; Dr Judy Ackerman, vice president and provost at the Rockville Campus; Dr Rita Kranidis, professor of English and director of the Global Humanities Institute (GHI); and other members of the College attended a meeting that forged a relationship with Xian University in Xian, China, home of the terracotta warriors. The partnership was initiated by Dr. Kranidis in the fulfillment of the institute's grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Montgomery County, which has selected Xian for its Sister Cities program, assisted with this effort in many ways. The Memorandum of Understanding includes provisions for a series of seminars and colloquia between humanities faculty at Xian University and Montgomery College, to be carried out when the GHI will sponsor travel to China for fifteen faculty, staff, and administrators. Topics for these discussions will include the cultural value of the humanities in China and in the United States, views on need for global curricula, and public arts and humanities programs. Additionally, the MOU opens the possibility of future student and faculty exchanges. Xian University has a strong commitment to history, cultural preservation and study, and is thus the ideal partner for the work of the Global Humanities Institute.
Date Range: 2013-2017
Location: Montgomery College, MD; Xian University, China
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=57942
Primary URL Description: Memorandum of Understanding with Xian University


Digital Resources for Historical Research
Grant details: EE-50022-04
Title: Digital Resources for Historical Research
Author: Massimo Riva
Abstract: A presentation of the VHL and the Garibaldi & the Risorgimento project as a platform for collaborative research in the history of culture.
Date Range: 3-29-2010
Location: École Normale Superieure


Univeristy of Notre Dame -- Philosophy as a Way of Life Project
Grant details: EH-256890-17
Title: Univeristy of Notre Dame -- Philosophy as a Way of Life Project
Author: Meghan Sullivan
Abstract: The Philosophy as a Way of Life Project is both a website with resources and a blog and a series of annual workshops. Funding for this project comes from the Mellon Foundation, but the impetus and ideas emerged directly from the Summer 2018 NEH Institute, Reviving Philosophy as a Way of Life.
Date Range: June 2019 - June 2021
Primary URL: https://philife.nd.edu/


The Stories of Flannery and Faulkner
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: The Stories of Flannery and Faulkner
Abstract: Academic conference about O'Connor that brought back to campus several of the NEH Institute participants. Approx. 350 attendees total. 11 paper presentations were by NEH Institute participants; two other participants were part of a panel of 9 NEH Institute participants who discussed their experiences teaching O'Connor.
Date Range: 2-5 April 2008
Location: GCSU, Milledgeville


Startling Figures: A Celebration of the Legacy of Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Startling Figures: A Celebration of the Legacy of Flannery O'Connor
Abstract: Academic conference on O'Connor which brought back to GCSU several of the 2007 NEH Institute participants, 11 of whom presented papers. Total conference attendance approx. 450.
Date Range: 13-16 Apr. 2011
Location: GCSU, Milledgeville, GA
Primary URL: http://www.gcsu.edu/startlingfigures
Primary URL Description: Contains conference program, registration info, speaker info, etc.


O'Connor sessions at American Literature Association conference
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: O'Connor sessions at American Literature Association conference
Author: J. Ramsey Michaels, Linda Rohrer Paige, Carolyn M. Kerr, Barbara Zimmermann Bogue, Roger Stanley
Abstract: Five participants in the NEH O'Connor Institute presented O'Connor papers at the ALA conference in Savannah, Oct. 2010. J. Ramsey Michaels presented "Parker and Sarah Ruth: The New Testament Wedded to the Old," Linda Rohrer Paige presented "Monkeying Around at the Tower: The Pitstop at Red Sammy's in the "'Race" of Man' in Flannery O'Connor's 'A Good Man Is Hard to Find,'" Carolyn M. Kerr presented "Why Do You Call Me Good?" Barbara Zimmermann Bogue presented "Red Sammy: Vital to the Grandmother's Characterization and to the Plot of 'A Good Man Is Hard to Find,'" and Roger Stanley presented "'Europe Act[ing]': Of Trans-conglomeration and Global Branding in a Post-Tower Millenium"
Date Range: 10/8-9/2010
Location: Savannah, GA


"What's a Good Catholic like Flannery O'Connor Doing with a Heretic"
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: "What's a Good Catholic like Flannery O'Connor Doing with a Heretic"
Author: Steve Watkins
Abstract: Conference presentation at Rome, Italy, O'Connor conference
Date Range: 2009
Location: Rome, Italy


Modern Jewish Spaces in light of the Venice Ghetto
Grant details: EH-50196
Title: Modern Jewish Spaces in light of the Venice Ghetto
Author: Murray Baumgarten
Abstract: Contemporary globalization brings to the forefront the relation between identity and spatial location; it highlights new and multiple cross-cutting transnational allegiances that bear on central aspects of Jewish identity, which some contemporary writers and researchers have begun to explore and elaborate. The Venice Ghetto raises a range of questions about Modern Jewish Spaces that have played central roles in Jewish and European culture since the Jews were sequestered in the Ghetto at its founding in 1516. The history of the Ghetto, its image and its symbolic resonances have generated different models that have become subtexts of several Modern Jewish Spaces, often implicitly reverted to in desperate Jewish historical moments.
Date Range: Summer 2013
Location: Van Leer Jerusalem Institute


"Reading Race and Political Violence; Flannery O'Connor"
Grant details: EH-50366-13
Title: "Reading Race and Political Violence; Flannery O'Connor"
Author: Alison Staudinger
Abstract: Panel organized for the American Literature Association annual conference in May of 2015.
Date Range: May 2015
Location: Boston, MA


The Objects of O’Connor: A Roundtable Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor
Grant details: EH-50366-13
Title: The Objects of O’Connor: A Roundtable Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor
Author: Gina Caison
Abstract: Roundtable organized for the Society for the Study of Southern Literature, March 2016. The organizer also presented a paper during the roundtable about "the feather" in O'Connor.
Date Range: 3/10/2016
Location: Boston University


SESSION: “So Near and yet so foreign: Negotiating Touristic Experience through Design"
Grant details: EH-50424-14
Title: SESSION: “So Near and yet so foreign: Negotiating Touristic Experience through Design"
Author: Sara Desvernine Reed
Abstract: Cuban graphic designer Conrado Massaguer’s promotional advertisement, featuring a voluptuous Cuban woman holding maracas and boasting the slogan, “So near and yet so foreign,” was utilized by the Cuban Tourist Commission in a promotion to its U.S. neighbors in the 1950s. Today, the messages in the promotion are ironically prescient. Normalizing relations between the United States and Cuba has yielded heightened interest among U.S. citizens and already throngs of American tourists have traveled to Cuba, many of whom aim to experience Cuba “before it changes.” But what will shape their experience? Contemporary theories of tourism embrace the concept of a “tourist gaze” as the performative, embodied practices of being a tourist, which are focused on the visual, as well as other sensorial experiences. This panel seeks to address the understudied, though integral, role that design plays in tourism practices. From promotional visual material, to luggage design, to “indigenous” crafts, to hotel furniture and landscaping, how does design mediate the tourist experience? How does design normalize the tourist’s life back home by creating an experience of an other? Likewise, how does design offer a space for locals to exert agency in negotiating their representation? How does design interrogate the dichotomies that are negotiated in touristic experiences--near/far, familiar/foreign, inclusive/exclusive, comfort/discomfort, authentic/inauthentic? Papers may explore the ways in which design, as experienced by any or all of the senses, has either perpetuated the stereotypes of otherness or has contradicted and counteracted these stereotypes.
Date Range: 02/03/2017
Location: New York, New York
Primary URL: http://conference.collegeart.org/schedule/
Primary URL Description: Schedule for the College Art Association Annual Conference


What we read now, What they read then
Grant details: EH-50429-14
Title: What we read now, What they read then
Author: Blurton, Heather
Author: Reynolds, Dwight
Abstract: Medieval texts that exist only in "unica" manuscripts
Date Range: 05/5-6/2017
Location: UC Santa Barbara


Performance Exchange
Grant details: ES-50503-13
Title: Performance Exchange
Abstract: After meeting at the NEH Institute in San Jose, CA, high school teachers Faisal Mohyuddin, Aaron Becker, and John Ehresman conceived of an exchange of three subjects (English, Spanish, Social Studies), three different schools (Evanston Township H.S., North Lawndale College Prep, Highland Park H.S.), and three different demographics. The teachers selected one of their classes of students to participate in the exchange. Each class visited the other schools once, and during that visit, the visiting students were supposed to have created and directed the activities. After the hour's activities, students were assigned a shadow and they attended classes with their partner and lunch as well. After the final school visit, all three groups united at Northwestern University for a "summit," where Lakin Valdez led a performance-based workshop.
Date Range: October 2014 to May 2015
Location: Chicago, IL
Primary URL: http://www.evanstonroundtable.com/main.asp?SectionID=16&SubSectionID=27&ArticleID=9822?


Reconstruction Sesquicentennial Lectures
Grant details: ES-50571-14
Title: Reconstruction Sesquicentennial Lectures
Author: J. Brent Morris
Author: Orville Vernon Burton
Author: Stephen Wise
Abstract: Lecture series, in conjunction with the South Carolina Humanities festival, that focused on the memory and commemoration of the Civil War and Reconstruction Era in American history and culture.
Date Range: June 10-11, 2016
Location: Beaufort, SC
Primary URL: http://schumanities.org/annualevents/humanitiesfestival/
Primary URL Description: SC Humanities festival


Gamelan and Wayang as Inter- and Intra-Cultural Objects
Grant details: FA-232431-16
Title: Gamelan and Wayang as Inter- and Intra-Cultural Objects
Author: Sumarsam
Abstract: Ethnomusicology is often conceived as the study of cultural performances by living musicians and their roles in contemporary society. This implies that the field is lacking interest in historical approach to the formulation of performing arts. I argue that in order to fully understand any forms of contemporary performance genres, it is important to trace their historical formation and transformation. Formation refers to the process of formulating a certain genre in a particular period of history; transformation, the genre continues, change, modify, or disappear in accord with the changes of socio-cultural circumstances. This paper discusses contemporary gamelan and wayang from the above line of thoughts: in what ways and what is the result after the genres have to adjust themselves to certain historical and socio-cultural changes and the changing of artists’ perspectives. Two main processes define the change and continuity of these performance genres: (1) the interaction between Java and other islands in Indonesia (intra-cultural interaction), and (2) the interaction between Java and foreign culture (inter-cultural interaction). I will illustrate the former by examining the dynamic historical relationship between Java and Bali, its impact on performing arts in both regions. For the latter, the relation between the West and Indonesia in the twentieth century will be discussed, particularly its impact on the content and context of contemporary wayang and gamelan.
Date Range: August 27-29, 2017
Location: Indonesian Institute of the Arts, Yogyakarta


True Lies: Threat Conflation and the 2003 Invasion of Iraq.
Grant details: FA-251744-17
Title: True Lies: Threat Conflation and the 2003 Invasion of Iraq.
Author: Kelly M. Greenhill
Abstract: When uncertainty is high, and verifiable facts are inconvenient or few, how do individuals learn what to fear and how to respond to the threats they have identified? Coupling findings from recent breakthroughs in cognitive science and psychology with theoretical insights from political science, this paper presents a theory to explain how invented, embellished or simply unverified sources of security-related information can be strategically deployed to materially inform and influence public opinion as well as foreign and defense policy formulation and implementation. I show how, by exploiting inherent human cognitive, psychological and biological limitations and predispositions, enterprising actors both inside and outside governments—“merchants of menace,” if you will—can strategically and successfully employ EFI to transform vague, (often) inchoate, and sometimes remote, objective sources of anxiety into proximate, and even existentially menacing, albeit unverifiable, threats to domestic and/or international security. This transmutation happens through a process I call “threat conflation,” which is related to, but distinct from, its heretofore more thoroughly explored cousin “threat inflation.” The theory is then tested using the case of the decision-making process in the lead-up to the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq (and against the most plausible alternative explanations for the invasion).
Date Range: March 2017; April 2017
Location: Baltimore, MD; Clinton, NY


A Likely Story? The Effect of Information Source on the Credibility and Diffusion of Rumors in Conflict Areas
Grant details: FA-251744-17
Title: A Likely Story? The Effect of Information Source on the Credibility and Diffusion of Rumors in Conflict Areas
Author: Kelly M. Greenhill
Author: Ben Oppenheim
Abstract: Rumors are ubiquitous, and their adoption and diffusion have been linked to episodes of political instability, violence and the eruption of war. But not all rumors survive or proliferate, and only some of those that do are disseminated widely enough to influence patterns of collective violence. A critical type of filtering occurs at the individual level: individuals have to assess whether to accept or dismiss new information, and the plausibility and credibility of a rumor’s source are thought to be key factors in this decision-making process. Drawing upon original survey data from civil war affected areas in southern Thailand and the Philippines, this article examines where civilians turn to for information when verifiable facts are in short supply, and explores the impact of information source on the uptake and diffusion of rumors. Existing theories offer competing propositions about the relative importance of elites, the media and social and kinship networks in rumor uptake and diffusion. Our findings suggest that local elites can play a singular role: even though they may rarely be the primary source of unverified information, they are highly influential when they do spread a rumor, particularly one about which they might be expected to have inside knowledge.
Date Range: 2017-18


Combating Fake News: An Agenda for Research and Action
Grant details: FA-251744-17
Title: Combating Fake News: An Agenda for Research and Action
Author: See https://shorensteincenter.org/combating-fake-news-agenda-for-research/
Abstract: ecent shifts in the media ecosystem raise new concerns about the vulnerability of democratic societies to fake news and the public’s limited ability to contain it. Fake news as a form of misinformation benefits from the fast pace that information travels in today’s media ecosystem, in particular across social media platforms. An abundance of information sources online leads individuals to rely heavily on heuristics and social cues in order to determine the credibility of information and to shape their beliefs, which are in turn extremely difficult to correct or change. The relatively small, but constantly changing, number of sources that produce misinformation on social media offers both a challenge for real-time detection algorithms and a promise for more targeted socio-technical interventions.
Date Range: February-April 2017
Location: Cambridge and Boston, MA


Information and Other Influence Operations
Grant details: FA-251744-17
Title: Information and Other Influence Operations
Author: Kelly M. Greenhill
Abstract: Office of Net Assessment Meeting on Societal Warfare
Date Range: June 29, 2017
Location: Washington, DC


Combatting Fake News and Other Extra-factual Information
Grant details: FA-251744-17
Title: Combatting Fake News and Other Extra-factual Information
Author: Kelly M. Greenhill
Abstract: Part of DOD's SMA Lecture/Seminar Series
Date Range: June 19, 2017
Location: Virtual/Washington, DC


Another World Is Possible: The Black Radical Life and Legacy of Louise Little
Grant details: FA-252423-17
Title: Another World Is Possible: The Black Radical Life and Legacy of Louise Little
Author: Erik McDuffie
Abstract: This paper examined the dynamic life and grass-roots pan-African activism of Louise Little, the Grenada-born activists best known as the mother of Malcolm X
Date Range: October 18, 2018
Location: Rutgers University
Secondary URL: http://https://history.rutgers.edu/events/calendar/icalrepeat.detail/2018/10/19/885/-/histories-of-radical-black-women-s-symposium?tmpl=component


Sectarian Affiliations and Turkish Iranian Relations
Grant details: FA-252460-17
Title: Sectarian Affiliations and Turkish Iranian Relations
Author: Sabri Ates
Abstract: This paper suggests that the history of Iran–Turkey relations is one of secularisation notwithstanding the intense religious wars that consumed them in the early 16th century and their recent antagonistic projects in places like Syria. Shi'a Iran and the Sunni Ottoman Turks signed their first treaty in 1555 and recognised each other despite their sectarian differences. Subsequently, 10 years before the establishment of the Westphalian state system, the two parties signed a treaty that emphasised the principle of non-interference in each other’s affairs and respect for territorial sovereignty. Iran-Turkey relations thereafter closely mirrored the development of European ideas about territorial sovereignty and non-sectarianism in international relations. The paper concludes that, given this history of secularisation, Iran and Turkey are likely to manage their interstate contention in the long haul.
Date Range: 07/05/2018
Location: Singapore National University


The Voice of Time: Classical German Thought and the Ethics of Progress in W.E.B. Du Bois’s Souls of Black Folk
Grant details: FA-252575-17
Title: The Voice of Time: Classical German Thought and the Ethics of Progress in W.E.B. Du Bois’s Souls of Black Folk
Author: Michael Saman
Abstract: "Wednesday Wisdom" roundtable discussion of German thought in W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk.
Date Range: 02/16/2008
Location: W.E.B. Du Bois Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Primary URL: https://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/02/umass_great_barrington_celebra.html


“Techné & Histories of Rhetoric"
Grant details: FA-52353-06
Title: “Techné & Histories of Rhetoric"
Author: Janet M. Atwill
Abstract: This lecture surveyed the significance of Aristotle's designation of rhetoric as a techné.
Date Range: 10/15/2006
Location: University of Iowa


“The Soul and the State in Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Dio Chrysostom"
Grant details: FA-52353-06
Title: “The Soul and the State in Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Dio Chrysostom"
Author: Janet M. Atwill
Abstract: Dio Chrysostom has been known as the "Stoic Sophist," a student of Musonius Rufus. This paper returned to the stoic treatises of Musonius Rufus and compared his pragmatic interpretation of stoicism with the more ascetic version found in Epictetus.
Date Range: 07/24/2009
Location: International Society for the History of Rhetoric, Montreal


Religion, Community, and Slavery on the Colonial Southern Frontier
Grant details: FA-52858-07
Title: Religion, Community, and Slavery on the Colonial Southern Frontier
Author: James Van Horn Melton
Abstract: Invited lecture on my 2016 book by the same title
Date Range: 4/6/2016
Location: Department of History, University of Minnesota Twin-Cities


Schaffe, schaffe, Siedlung baue: Zur deutschsprachigen Migration nach Nordamerika im 18. Jahrhundert
Grant details: FA-52858-07
Title: Schaffe, schaffe, Siedlung baue: Zur deutschsprachigen Migration nach Nordamerika im 18. Jahrhundert
Author: James Van Horn Melton
Abstract: Examines why German-speaking emigrants to British America were economically successful in the New World.
Date Range: 9 July 2015
Location: Lehrstuehl fuer Europaeische Ethnologie und Volkskunde, Universitaet Augsburg


In a Future Tense: Immigration Law, Counterfactual Histories, and Chinese Invasion
Grant details: FA-55067-10
Title: In a Future Tense: Immigration Law, Counterfactual Histories, and Chinese Invasion
Author: Edlie Wong
Abstract: Invited to give the William Bennett Munro Memorial Seminar at the California Institute of Technology.
Date Range: May 18, 2012
Location: California Institute of Technology
Primary URL: http://www.caltech.edu/content/william-bennett-munro-memorial-seminar-4
Primary URL Description: CalTech Calendar of Events


Futures Past: Counterfactual Histories and Comparative Racialization in the Chinese Invasion Novel
Grant details: FA-55067-10
Title: Futures Past: Counterfactual Histories and Comparative Racialization in the Chinese Invasion Novel
Author: Edlie Wong
Abstract: Invited to give one day seminar and talk on current research at Pennsylvania State University as part of English Department's Imaginary Vistas Series.
Date Range: February 24, 2012
Location: Pennsylvania State University
Primary URL: http://english.la.psu.edu/events/imaginary-vistas-series-to-present-edlie-wong
Primary URL Description: Penn State University English Department Events


"Visual Rhetoric and Reform in Medieval Rome,"
Grant details: FA-55234-10
Title: "Visual Rhetoric and Reform in Medieval Rome,"
Author: Maureen C. Miller
Abstract: Chapter of "Vestire la Chiesa" discussing the relationship between changes in clerical attire in the city of Rome and the reform movements of the 11th c.
Date Range: 10/26/2013
Location: Huntington Library, Pasadena, CA


Grupo 'intertextualidade na literatura latina' / research group 'intertextuality in Latin literature'
Grant details: FA-57324-13
Title: Grupo 'intertextualidade na literatura latina' / research group 'intertextuality in Latin literature'
Author: Stephen Hinds
Author: Stephen Harrison
Abstract: In November 2014, as part of a ‘double act’ with another senior poetic Latinist, from Oxford, I made an invited research visit to the University of Campinas in São Paulo Province, Brazil, one of the major centers of a recent nationwide expansion in Brazilian Classics, for a two-day event on poetic intertextuality in which we each gave two papers and offered consultations to the department's graduate students about international contexts for their research. My hosts had just completed a research project on the early 19th century translation of Virgil’s Aeneid into Brazilian Portuguese by Odorico Mendes, a founding event for the establishment of transatlantic Portuguese as a language with an identity and prestige separable from its European counterpart. This was an apt project for the growing Campinas department, in which, even now, a characteristic MA assignment is to produce an annotated translation of an ancient work not previously translated into Brazilian Portuguese, both as a kind of advanced basic training in Classics and as a visionary attempt to restore ancient Greek and Latin texts to the mainstream of modern Brazilian learned literary culture; the PhD assignment, after the MA, adds a research monograph to complete a published ‘package’. A week spent hovering between Latin, English and (through interpreters) Portuguese was fascinating in itself and as living context for my own research project on Poetry across Languages; and, unexpectedly, the Campinas team turned out to be the ideal audience for my work in progress on Wordsworth’s Aeneid.
Date Range: 11/17/14-11/18/14
Location: University of Campinas, Brazil


Religious Affections in Colonial North America
Grant details: FA-58221-15
Title: Religious Affections in Colonial North America
Author: Abram Van Engen
Author: Caroline Wigginton
Abstract: This was a special conference, co-organized by myself and Caroline Wigginton and hosted by the Huntington Library, on the topic of religious affections in early America. (It flowed from my work on Winthrop's sermon and its language of sympathy.)
Date Range: January 27-28, 2017
Location: Huntington Library
Primary URL: http://www.huntington.org/religiousaffections/


Slavery and Freedom in Concord, MA
Grant details: FB-52999-07
Title: Slavery and Freedom in Concord, MA
Author: Elise Lemire
Abstract: Making Freedom: Evolution and Revolution in the Realization of an American Ideal is a three-year, $979,475 Teaching American History (TAH) grant through the United States Department of Education. This award will enable five partnering public school districts—Burlington, Bedford, Lexington, Woburn, and Somerville–to appreciably strengthen their programs to teach traditional American history as a separate academic subject in grades three to five and eight to eleven. "Doing Massachusetts History: 1620-1812" was one of the seminars offered in the summer of 2011. "Slavery and Freedom in Concord, MA" was taught as part of that seminar.
Date Range: 08/19/2011
Location: Minute Man National Historical Park, Concord, MA
Primary URL: http://info.tahmakingfreedom.org/?page_id=423
Primary URL Description: Course Descriptions for the "Making Freedom" program.


Teaching Massachusetts Slavery
Grant details: FB-52999-07
Title: Teaching Massachusetts Slavery
Author: Elise Lemire
Abstract: Part of a Teachers Summer Institute at the Museum of African American History in Boston, MA
Date Range: 06/30/2011
Location: Museum of African American History
Primary URL: http://www.maah.org/education.htm
Primary URL Description: Educational Programs page at the Museum of African American History's website


“The Countess and the Soldier’s Wife: How the Great War Transformed Women: Petrograd 1914-1917”
Grant details: FB-53760-08
Title: “The Countess and the Soldier’s Wife: How the Great War Transformed Women: Petrograd 1914-1917”
Author: Adele Lindenmeyr
Abstract: The presentation offered a new understanding of the effects of World War I on Russian women by examining relief to victims of the war on the home front, particularly the system of state allowances paid to the wives and families of soldiers. The provision of war-related relief emancipated and radicalized both the upper- and middle-class women who administered the system, and the soldiers’ wives they interacted with.
Date Range: September 28, 2015 (Penn State) - October 2, 2015 (Harvard)
Location: Pennsylvania State University History Department; Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University


"Countess Sofia Vladimirovna Panina in the History of Russian Philanthropy and Democracy"
Grant details: FB-53760-08
Title: "Countess Sofia Vladimirovna Panina in the History of Russian Philanthropy and Democracy"
Author: Adele Lindenmeyr
Abstract: Countess Sofia Vladimirovna Panina deserves attention as an individual whose significance is considerable not only for modern Russian social and political history, but also for the history of social reform, women’s rights, and humanitarian aid to refugees in the 20th century. This paper provided an overview of several of the events that had the most influence on her life, and analyzed her transformation from a wealth heiress into a liberal and a democrat.
Date Range: May 29-31, 2011
Location: Moscow, the Solzhenitsyn Institute for the Study of the Russian Emigration


Simpósio Diálogo Brasil/EUA em História Ambiental: Definindo Agendas e Estratégias de Pesquisa em Comum
Grant details: FB-55007-10
Title: Simpósio Diálogo Brasil/EUA em História Ambiental: Definindo Agendas e Estratégias de Pesquisa em Comum
Author: Lise Sedrez
Abstract: I have organized this international symposium which, indirectly, was a by-product of my grant.
Date Range: March 12-15, 2013
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Primary URL: http://labhe.historia.ufrj.br/


Ernest Hemingway in Chicago
Grant details: FB-55474-11
Title: Ernest Hemingway in Chicago
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: I gave the plenary talk at International Ernest Hemingway Conference, which was held in Oak Park IL in July 2016.
Date Range: July 18, 2016
Location: Oak Park, IL--Dominican University


Modernism and the Ephemeral
Grant details: FB-55474-11
Title: Modernism and the Ephemeral
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: I was invited to the Wolfsonian Museum-Florida International University to discuss the significance of the Chicago designer Will Bradley. I also led a seminar that focused on the "little magazines" of modernism.
Date Range: March, 2016.
Location: Miami Beach, FLA.


Symbolic Worlds and Everyday Lives: New Directions in Vijayanagara Research
Grant details: FB-55612-11
Title: Symbolic Worlds and Everyday Lives: New Directions in Vijayanagara Research
Author: Valerie Stoker
Author: Ilanit Loewy Shacham
Author: Kathleen Morrison
Abstract: This workshop brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines who work on diverse aspects of the Vijayanagara Empire. While the field of Vijayanagara studies has enjoyed a long period of productive interdisciplinary collaboration among Indian, European, and North American scholars, this collaboration has tended to focus on the Empire’s material culture. This makes sense in light of the Empire’s extensive art and architectural remains and the voluminous inscriptional records detailing their political, economic, and social significance. As this research on Vijayanagara continues to develop, additional work in Vijayanagara studies is being done in other fields such as literature and religious studies. We propose to conduct a broader interdisciplinary workshop that will expand the types of collaborations on Vijayanagara. The goals of this workshop would be to introduce new scholars and scholarship to the “Vijayanagara scholars” group, and discuss how new findings fit in with previous models. Because the Vijayanagara court’s patronage of a variety of economic, cultural, and religious institutions and networks contributed materially to the theoretical and symbolic worlds depicted in the texts, one goal of the proposed conference would be to explore those connections more deeply. Precisely by examining the specific and dynamic links between material and other forms of culture, we might also seek to question the dichotomy between “textual-based” scholarship as pertaining to a theoretical, symbolic world and “artifact-based” scholarship as pertaining to everyday life.
Date Range: 11/7/15-11/8/15
Location: University of Chicago
Primary URL: https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/vijayanagara/


Globalization and American Suburbia Since 1970
Grant details: FB-56050-12
Title: Globalization and American Suburbia Since 1970
Author: Becky Nicolaides
Abstract: This invited lecture explored major trends in suburban diversification since 1970, using illustrative examples from Los Angeles.
Date Range: 04/22/2016
Location: Georgia Tech
Primary URL: http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/54764


Keynote address: Stills from L.A.: Reflections on diversity and the remaking of suburban life
Grant details: FB-56050-12
Title: Keynote address: Stills from L.A.: Reflections on diversity and the remaking of suburban life
Author: Becky Nicolaides
Abstract: This keynote address of the British Association for American Studies Conference described emerging trends in suburban diversity, using Los Angeles as a rich illustrative example.
Date Range: 04/20/2013
Location: University of Exeter, UK
Primary URL: http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/research/conferences/baas2013/


Rectifying Anachronisms in the Samguk sagi’s Representation of Early Korean History
Grant details: FB-56856-13
Title: Rectifying Anachronisms in the Samguk sagi’s Representation of Early Korean History
Author: Jonathan W. Best
Abstract: The twelfth-century Samguk sagi contains annals for all three early Korean kingdoms beginning with their putative foundations in the first century BCE. Yet the evidence of both earlier Chinese histories and peninsular archaeology indicate that the two southernmost of the polities, Silla and Paekche, did not develop as royal states until the fourth century. Consequently, as complimentary as the presumed antiquity of these two kingdoms may have been, it also had the effect of creating an initial void of over three hundred and fifty years in their actual histories. The editors of the Samguk sagi evidently made use of several different strategies to fill the historiographic voids created by the impossibly early foundation dates that they credited to the two southern kingdoms in particular—for instance, the insertion of accounts of celestial phenomena extracted from China’s dynastic histories, including some that could not have been observed anywhere in Korea. Many of the Samguk sagi’s anachronistic entries possess, however, a persuasive “ring” of credibility, exhibiting compelling indicators of historicity such as the inclusion of specific personal names, ranks and places. The entries in this last group have the hallmarks of being antedated reports of bona fide events from the original accounts of the kingdoms. In my presentation, I briefly explain the basic elements of the methodology whereby I rectify the anachronistic dating of entries in the Samguk sagi and then illustrate the virtue of the methodology by applying it to several anomalous entries from the annals of that text.
Date Range: March & July 2013
Location: San Diego, CA (Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting) & Vienna, Austria (Association for Korean Studies in Europe Biennial Meeting)
Primary URL: http:// NA
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL: http:// NA
Secondary URL Description: NA


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: A discussion of some points from my forthcoming book
Date Range: 30 April, 2014
Location: King's College, University of London, Intellectual History seminar


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: Presentation of some of the main themes of my forthcoming books
Date Range: 10 June, 2014
Location: Oxford History of Political Thought Seminar, St. Anne's College, Oxford University


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: Presentation of some of the main themes of my book
Date Range: 2 June, 2014
Location: European History Seminar, Oriel College, Oxford university


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: Presentation of some themes from my book
Date Range: 5 March, 2014
Location: Politics Dept. Seminar, University of Hull, UK


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: Presentation of some themes from my book project
Date Range: 17 February, 2014
Location: John Tudor Memorial Lecture, University of Durham, UK


Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Grant details: FB-56901-13
Title: Tocqueville, Democracy, and Religion
Author: Alan Kahan
Abstract: Presentation of some aspects of my book
Date Range: 20 March, 2014
Location: Graduate History Seminar, Graduate Center of the City University of New York


Was there an Islamo-Mediterranean Culture & When?
Grant details: FB-57108-13
Title: Was there an Islamo-Mediterranean Culture & When?
Author: Karen Pinto
Author: Brian Catlos
Abstract: Given all the work that has been done on the subject in the last decade, that there was an Islamo-Mediterranean culture is undeniable. To mention but a few examples because there are too many to mention. See, for instance, the work of Brian Catlos, Karla Mallette, Sarah Secord-Davis, Jessica Goldberg, Olivia Remie Constable, and other participants of this workshop. What all this research has proven in agreement with Braudel, Goitein, and the other yea-saying scholars of yore is that they were right to see the Mediterranean as a region of intense cultural encounters religious, architectural, textual, mythological, navigational and otherwise. From tinkers, tailors, soldiers, sailors, traders, travelers, pilgrims, crusaders, and other folk, we hear story upon story of one Mediterranean Encounter after another.
Date Range: MEH/MED Middle East History/Mediterranean, The Mediterranean Seminar, Boulder, Colorado


Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions: African American Politics and U.S. History in the Long 19th Century
Grant details: FB-58325-15
Title: Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions: African American Politics and U.S. History in the Long 19th Century
Author: Van Gosse
Author: David Waldstreicher
Abstract: A Conference to be held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies of the University of Pennsylvania [February 8-9, 2017] Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions seeks to gather historians of US politics and African-American life to consider collectively not whether African Americans participated in the politics of the early, ante- and post-bellum republic, but how, when, and with what lasting effects. It will bring together various historiographical revisions now in process, including the recognition that the Civil War and Reconstruction typify rather than divide the middle period of American history. We are on the cusp of a new understanding of our national origins, seeing the American Revolution as a violent civil war shaped in large part by slavery and black participation. The Revolutionary settlement of half-slave and half-free thus defines a first Emancipation and first Reconstruction, part of a single “long” process beginning in the North and culminating in the South. We believe that our understanding of modern African American and U.S. politics will be fruitfully renovated by rethinking prior emancipations and reconstructions, in ways that do not take for granted the nature and outcomes of revolutions that could easily be described as civil wars followed by reconstructions.
Date Range: 2016-2017
Location: Graduate Center of CUNY and McNeil Center of the University of Pennsylvania


Who Cares What "The Federalist Papers" Say?
Grant details: FEL-258145-18
Title: Who Cares What "The Federalist Papers" Say?
Author: Alison L. LaCroix
Abstract: A discussion of the Federalist essays and why they matter today, with special reference to the founding period and the early nineteenth century.
Date Range: 10/31/18
Location: Wisconsin Judicial Conference, Lake Geneva, WI


Endangered Languages of Idaho
Grant details: FN-260674-18
Title: Endangered Languages of Idaho
Author: Tim Thornes
Abstract: The United Nations has declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. This timely lecture on a study of the endangered languages of Idaho tribes will use research and findings to provide a regional context to a complex global issue.
Date Range: 2019
Location: Yanke Research Center, Boise State University
Primary URL: https://www.boisestate.edu/osher/browse-curriculum/


“The Historical Boundaries of Japan’s ODA Projects: 1950s and 1960s 'Comprehensive Development Projects' and their Connection to the Pre-War Era"
Grant details: FO-252221-17
Title: “The Historical Boundaries of Japan’s ODA Projects: 1950s and 1960s 'Comprehensive Development Projects' and their Connection to the Pre-War Era"
Author: Aaron S. Moore
Abstract: This paper introduced the key ideologies and personnel networks from Japan's colonial-wartime era, and showed how they played out at several development projects in Southeast Asia in the post-war.
Date Range: July 26, 2018
Location: Tokyo, Japan


“The Colonial and the Post-Colonial: Histories of Technology in Japan’s Empire and its Aftermath,”
Grant details: FO-252221-17
Title: “The Colonial and the Post-Colonial: Histories of Technology in Japan’s Empire and its Aftermath,”
Author: Aaron S. Moore
Abstract: Talk to grant foundation on ways in which histories of the Japanese empire can better inform the work of historians working on modern Japanese history.
Date Range: January 2018
Location: Pomona, CA


“Dams as Assemblages of Power: Japanese Engineers and the Post-Colonial, Cold War System of Development in South Korea"
Grant details: FO-252221-17
Title: “Dams as Assemblages of Power: Japanese Engineers and the Post-Colonial, Cold War System of Development in South Korea"
Author: Aaron S. Moore
Abstract: This paper focuses on the Soyanggang Multi-Purpose Dam project (1967-1973), Asia’s largest rock-fill dam and a prominent symbol of President Park Chung-hee’s “miracle of the Han” development policies in South Korea. The project, paid for largely by Japanese government grants, loans, and credits from the 1965 Normalization Treaty that settled all claims from the colonial past, was supervised by Japan’s leading development consultancy, Nippon Koei, a company that was run by former colonial engineers who had built what was equivalent to Japan’s entire domestic power production capacity during the colonial/wartime era in northern Korea. I argue that analyzing the power relations at different scales within transnational flows of ideals, materials, people, and capital around large-scale technical structures such as dams, which emerged out of entangled histories of Japanese colonial rule and the rise of the US Cold War order in East Asia, constitutes a promising direction in Asian environmental humanities.
Date Range: Dec 2017
Location: Durham, NC
Secondary URL: http://https://igs.duke.edu/events/scalar-effects-management-water-power-post-war-east-asia


Trans-Pacific Left Feminism: Japanese and American Old Left Women, from World War I to the US Occupation of Japan
Grant details: FO-258281-18
Title: Trans-Pacific Left Feminism: Japanese and American Old Left Women, from World War I to the US Occupation of Japan
Author: Michiko Takeuchi
Abstract: My paper, “Trans-Pacific Left Feminism: Japanese and American Old Left women, from World War I to the US Occupation of Japan,” explores the little-known relationship between Japanese and American Old Left women in the first half of the twentieth century. My archival research of their correspondence has revealed that the so-called “liberation of Japanese women” during the US occupation of Japan (1945–52), rather than being invented on the spot, was instead the result of decades of collaborative labor activism by Japanese and American women. By examining how Japanese and American feminists worked together across national, cultural, and racial boundaries to improve the status of women in Japan, my research highlights a transnational network of feminists centered on the Young Women’s Christian Association. The “liberation of Japanese women” in US-occupied Japan was much more of a dynamic site for a trans-Pacific and transwar socialist feminist movement, however limited, than the imperial “middle-class feminist” project of Cold War era, as previous scholarship has suggested.
Date Range: August 2019
Location: Vancouver, Canada


Behind the Lace Curtains: the YWCA and Trans-Pacific Labor Activism
Grant details: FO-258281-18
Title: Behind the Lace Curtains: the YWCA and Trans-Pacific Labor Activism
Author: Michiko Takeuchi
Abstract: My paper explores the little-known role of YWCA in creating the trans-Pacific network of Japanese and American women labor activists in the first half of the twentieth century. Based on archival research in Japan, the United States and Switzerland, I will discuss how their decades of collaborative activism based on YWCA connections resulted in the postwar “liberation of Japanese women,” rather than being invented on the spot during the US occupation in Japan (1945-52).
Date Range: June 2019
Location: Los Angeles, California


US-Japan Women’s Labor Activism
Grant details: FO-258281-18
Title: US-Japan Women’s Labor Activism
Author: Michiko Takeuchi
Abstract: (Translation) Based on archival research in Japan, the United States, and Switzerland, my talk will investigate the little-known relationship between Japanese and American feminists in the first half of the twentieth century. It will show that the so-called “liberation of Japanese women” during the US occupation of Japan (1945–52), rather than being invented on the spot, was instead the result of decades of collaborative labor activism by Japanese and American women. These women include Professors Fujita Taki and Lulu Holmes, the founders of the Japanese Association of University Women in 1946.
Date Range: July 2019


Mediators at the Edges of Empire
Grant details: FO-258291-18
Title: Mediators at the Edges of Empire
Author: Sakura Christmas
Author: Naveena Naqvi
Author: Alyssa Parades
Author: Yukiko Tonoike
Abstract: This one-day workshop examined the role of mediators in the making and unmaking of power, be it political, economic, or environmental, in various borderlands across InterAsian spaces. Bringing together interdisciplinary perspectives, the conveners consider the role of intermediaries, border-crossers, go-betweens, and middlemen in the frictional zones between polities, where state authority begins to break down. We conceptualize these zones geographically between state territories, topographically between the lowlands of economic elites and the highlands of the political opposition, and epistemologically between knowledge systems. Through ethnographic and historical attention to the instruments of translation and bureaucratic mechanisms of flows, we hope to address the following questions: How do views from the edges of empire reorient our understanding of the center? How are terms between newcomers and natives, imperialists and indigenes navigated, negotiated, and ultimately compromised on the ground? What experimental configurations of power then emerge as a result? The conveners seek to build a comparative framework and common vocabulary in order to analyze how mediators facilitate, obstruct, and reinvent dynamics of connection and disconnection in these spaces. In doing so, they aim to trace some of the patterns in which empires are reconstituted and transformed at their edges.
Date Range: 05/05/2019
Location: Yale University, New Haven CT
Primary URL: https://cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com/campuspress.yale.edu/dist/f/396/files/2019/05/Schedule-1.jpg
Primary URL Description: Workshop Program
Secondary URL: http://campuspress.yale.edu/interasia/events/
Secondary URL Description: Yale InterAsia Initiative Event Calendar


Book Manuscript Workshop for Nomadic Divide
Grant details: FO-258291-18
Title: Book Manuscript Workshop for Nomadic Divide
Author: Sakura Christmas
Abstract: Book Manuscript Workshop with Dani Botsman (Yale), Peter Perdue (Yale), Kalyanakrishnan (Shivi) Sivaramakrishnan (Yale), and Louise Young (Wisconsin).
Date Range: 04/26/2019
Location: Yale University, New Haven CT


"Reformation of the Book"
Grant details: FS-50092-06
Title: "Reformation of the Book"
Author: Graham, Michael, and 4 other seminar members
Abstract: two panel sessions at the 2008 Sixteenth Century Studies Conference
Date Range: 10/15-16/2008
Location: St. Louis


Enlightenment Aesthetics and Beyond
Grant details: FS-50103-07
Title: Enlightenment Aesthetics and Beyond
Author: Emily Brady
Abstract: A conference organized on Scottish and German aesthetics as a follow-up conference to the NEH seminar.
Date Range: 12/15/11-12/16/11
Location: School of Geography, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, Scotland
Primary URL: http://www.ppls.ed.ac.uk/philosophy/events/view/enlightenment-aesthetics-and-beyond
Primary URL Description: Event description and program.


"Health and Disease in the Middle Ages" [show prizes]
Grant details: FS-50283-11
Title: "Health and Disease in the Middle Ages"
Author: Monica H. Green
Abstract: “Health and Disease in the Middle Ages” was a five-week Seminar for College and University Teachers held June 24-July 28, 2012, in London, England. Based at the Wellcome Library—the world's premier research center for medical history—this Seminar gathered scholars from across the disciplines interested in questions of health, disease, and disability in medieval Europe. Support for this Seminar came from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (ACMRS). We explored how the new scientific technologies of identifying pathogens (particularly leprosy and plague) could inform traditional, humanistic methods (historical, literary, art historical, and linguistic) of understanding cultural responses to disease and disability. Reciprocally, we also explored how traditional, humanistic studies of medieval medicine could inform modern scientific studies of disease, which were developing at a rapid pace thanks to new methods of DNA retrieval and analysis.
Date Range: 06/2012-07/2012
Location: London, UK
Primary URL: http://healthanddisease2012.acmrs.org/index.html
Primary URL Description: "Health and Disease in the MIddle Ages" website


Gregorian Reform/Ecclesiastical Reform. Italian Perspectives on Historiographical Traditions in Dialogue [conference panel]
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: Gregorian Reform/Ecclesiastical Reform. Italian Perspectives on Historiographical Traditions in Dialogue [conference panel]
Author: Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri
Author: William L. North
Author: Umberto Longo
Abstract: The concept of ‘the Gregorian Reform’, as conceived about a century ago and still in use, interprets the various currents of ecclesiastical reform emerging between the 1040s and 1120s as a unitary project which, after a period of preparation, found its execution and full realization under Gregory VII (1073-1085). These presentations place this reading in dialogue with an alternative interpretation—advanced chiefly by Italian, German, and American historians—that understands reform as a complex, polyvalent phenomenon. Multi-directional and influenced by many individuals -- distinct in their interests, experiences and ideals -- only with time and struggle did the reform reach any eventual synthesis.
Date Range: 6-9 July 2015
Location: Leeds, UK
Primary URL: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
Primary URL Description: 2015 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, UK


Artistic Languages of Reform in Italy [conference panel]
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: Artistic Languages of Reform in Italy [conference panel]
Author: Kim Butler Wingfield
Author: Maureen C. Miller
Author: Lila Yawn
Author: Cristiana Filippini
Author: Gillian B. Elliott
Abstract: Just as medieval reformers sought to critique, inspire, and transform through the written and spoken word, so they mobilized artistic media as well as iconography to express their message. Yet, the relationship between art and intellectual and institutional developments is rarely simple and programmatic. After an initial contribution that evaluates methodologically scholarship linking artistic production and reform during the late eleventh and twelfth centuries, the remaining papers explore in depth two examples of the complex nexus of artistic expression, reform, and power as it manifested itself in the ecclesiastical sculpture of northern Italian churches and in the fresco programs of the Vatican
Date Range: 6-9 July 2015
Location: Leeds, UK
Primary URL: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
Primary URL Description: 2015 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, UK


Reform between Text and Experience [conference panel]
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: Reform between Text and Experience [conference panel]
Author: William L. North
Author: Fiona Somerset
Author: Cheryl Kaufman
Author: John Eldevik
Author: Lezlie Knox
Abstract: How is the reformer’s imagination nourished and their energies mobilized? This panel explores the diverse ways in which lived (or imagined) experience combined with texts to challenge, transform, and re-stabilize religious life and structures. Through examinations of how Lateran canons asserted their vital role in the liturgical life of the Eternal City, the impetus to reform provided by an account of a journey to the East, and the systematic recording of the lives and legends of Francscan ‘local heroes’, panelists explore the essential role of “textualized experience” in both articulating and institutionally anchoring visions of a better Christianity.
Date Range: 6-9 July 2015
Location: Leeds, UK
Primary URL: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
Primary URL Description: 2015 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, UK


Reform of Space and Place in Medieval Italy {conference panel]
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: Reform of Space and Place in Medieval Italy {conference panel]
Author: William L. North
Author: Maureen C. Miller
Author: Gregor Kalas
Author: Edward M. Schoolman
Author: Emily E. Graham
Abstract: Reform often involves changes in beliefs and practices but a critical component to promote and establish such changes is the physical environment in which such changes occur and which can support (or undermine) reform initiatives. This panel explores the role of the physical, and particularly the built, environment in the expression and establishment of reform in medieval Italy between the seventh and 14th centuries. Furthermore, it does so at three scales: the individual church (Santa Maria Antiqua in Rome); the urban ecclesiastical fabric (Ravenna); and Franciscan female houses of San Silvestro in Capite and San Lorenzo in Panisperna in Rome.
Date Range: 6-9 July 2015
Location: Leeds, UK
Primary URL: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
Primary URL Description: 2015 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, UK


The Reformer's Evolution: Change in the Focus, Venue, and Media of Reform Initiatives in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: The Reformer's Evolution: Change in the Focus, Venue, and Media of Reform Initiatives in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries
Author: Maureen C. Miller
Author: William L. North
Author: Kathryn L. Jasper
Author: Marie-Thérèse Champagne
Author: Janet Youngdahl
Abstract: Although the language of reform can often lead to a perception of homogeneity and stability, closer examination of instances of reform reveals not only difference and dynamism within movements, but also significant change within the agents of reform themselves. The papers in this panel explore three distinct modes of personal “evolution” in the eleventh and twelfth centuries: in the case of Peter Damian, physical relocation and the redirection of reforming energy; in the works of Hildegard of Bingen, changing approaches to combining text, sound, and image; and with Nicholas Maniacutia, the reorientation of text-critical sensibilities towards a new object, namely the Vulgate.
Date Range: 6-9 July 2015
Location: Leeds, UK
Primary URL: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2015_call.html
Primary URL Description: 2015 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, UK


“Agent Orange, as Remembered in Vietnam’s Museums and International Film”
Grant details: FT-230079-15
Title: “Agent Orange, as Remembered in Vietnam’s Museums and International Film”
Author: Leslie J. Reagan
Abstract: This paper focuses on the presence of Agent Orange in Vietnamese culture and memory. Not only is dioxin, the toxic byproduct of Agent Orange, found in Vietnamese soil, fish, plants, and human breast milk, but Vietnamese culture is steeped in Agent Orange. Just about every school child and every tourist in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) will visit the War Remnants Museum—a peace museum, a historical museum, and a museum that interprets, teaches, and constructs the history of the American War and, especially, the history of Agent Orange as a chemical weapon that harmed and continues to harm the Vietnamese people and Vietnamese children. This paper walks through the museum, stops at certain points in the Agent Orange exhibits, and then focuses on a surgical scene in the Agent Orange exhibit. The photographs and objects that make up this particular section are an example of the warring themes in the museum’s exhibit of Agent Orange. The photographs and the exhibits overall drive home the message that the nation of Vietnam and the Vietnamese are victims of Agent Orange. At the same time, the museum subtly insists that the people disabled as a result of Agent Orange are not victims; they are active people, who have made lives for themselves. Yet, so many of the photographs—most taken by Western photographers—participate in what disabilities activists and scholars have named “the medical model” for they suggest that Western medicine and heroic surgery are the solution for disabled bodies. These large and prominently displayed images rely upon and project older Western narratives of disability that put people with unusual bodies on display as freaks in side shows or regarded them as pitiful beings in need of help. The presence and power of these images also suggest the difficulty of undermining those traditional views of people with disabilities, regardless of the intentions of museum curators.
Date Range: 6th International Conference on the History of Medicine in Southeast Asia, Jan. 13-15, 2016.
Location: Siem Reap, Cambodia


A Spiritual Revolution: The Impact of Reformation and Enlightenment in Orthodox Russia
Grant details: FT-260249-18
Title: A Spiritual Revolution: The Impact of Reformation and Enlightenment in Orthodox Russia
Author: Andrey Ivanov
Abstract: His current book project analyzes the influence of Reformation and Enlightenment ideas on the Russian Orthodox Church during the era of great reforms of the long eighteenth century (1700-1825). Drawing on previously overlooked sources in Halle, Wolfenbüttel, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Rome, and elsewhere, his study will place Russia, its empire, and the Orthodox Church into the wider intellectual continuum of the European Reformations, early modern confessionalization, and the early religious and secular Enlightenments that were so fundamental to the rise of modernity on the European continent and beyond. Dr. Ivanov has published his research in the Sixteenth Century Journal, Journal of Early Modern History, and Vivliofika, as well as in other publications. He is a recipient of several doctoral and postdoctoral awards, including grants and fellowships from the Institute for Research in the Humanities at UW-Madison, the Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel, the Edward J. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, the Josephine de Karman Foundation and the Smith Richardson Foundation at Yale, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is currently the Vice-President of the Eighteenth-Century Russian Studies Association.
Date Range: 2018
Primary URL: https://ndias.nd.edu/events/2018/09/11/106289-andrey-ivanov-a-spiritual-revolution-the-impact-of-reformation-and-enlightenment-in-orthodox-russia/


Legalizing the Impossible Subject: The White Russian Refugees and the Development of American Immigration and Refugee Law during the Great Depression
Grant details: FT-265205-19
Title: Legalizing the Impossible Subject: The White Russian Refugees and the Development of American Immigration and Refugee Law during the Great Depression
Author: S. Deborah Kang
Abstract: This conference paper provides a history of the White Russian refugees in the United States and discusses the implications of that history for the development of American immigration and refugee law.
Date Range: November 8, 2019
Location: Center for the Study of International Migration, UCLA
Primary URL: https://www.international.ucla.edu/migration/event/14013


Literature and Commodity Culture
Grant details: FT-53201-05
Title: Literature and Commodity Culture
Author: Sean C. Grass
Abstract: This seminar explores literature's complex interactions and exchanges with commodity culture, both before and after Marx. Offered as a session of the Kansas State University Regional Conference on Literature Studies.
Date Range: 04/14/2012
Location: Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS


Yugoslav Eulogies: The Footprints of Gavrilo Princip
Grant details: FT-53978-06
Title: Yugoslav Eulogies: The Footprints of Gavrilo Princip
Author: Paul Miller
Abstract: While scholars have intensively studied Yugoslavia’s weaknesses and dissolution (both in the interwar and post-World War II eras) from political and economic perspectives, there has been less work on the issue of cultural cohesion so crucial to Yugoslavism (the Yugoslav idea) as it was conceived and developed in the nineteenth century and elaborated upon during World War I. In particular, there has been little attempt to interrogate the long-term (1918–today) discursive construction of Yugoslav identity by means of collective memory—that is, the selectively shared stories people tell about themselves in order to give meaning to the ‘nation,’ a sense of belonging to the ‘national culture.’ And yet from the moment Yugoslavia was created, ordinary Yugoslavists began constructing the Sarajevo assassination as a heroic narrative of opposition and liberation that transcended the particularist identities of ethnicity, nation, religion, and history. How did the different Yugoslav regimes and post-Yugoslav political elites respond to these efforts to shape a collective cultural memory around Gavrilo Princip’s political murder of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire? What can the various manifestations of this memory and official attitudes towards it tell us about the Yugoslav national project writ large? These are the main themes addressed in my paper.
Date Range: May 15, 2014
Location: Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen (Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna, Austria)
Primary URL: http://www.iwm.at/events/event/yugoslav-eulogies
Primary URL Description: Institute calendar


“‘Up against a Stone Wall’: Gender, Power and the National Catholic Community Houses”
Grant details: FT-56922-09
Title: “‘Up against a Stone Wall’: Gender, Power and the National Catholic Community Houses”
Author: Jeanne Petit
Abstract: This paper explores the struggles American Catholic women faced when they tried to create national organizations for Catholic women. During the suffrage era, a time when women’s organizations were gaining unprecedented political and social influence, American Catholic laywomen wanted their voices recognized in the national debates of the day. They faced, however, both structural and cultural barriers in their attempts to do this. I will focus on three interconnected problems the women who worked on the Community House project had to confront. First, and most significantly, these laywomen had to battle both passive and active resistance of the patriarchal hierarchy who undermined the women’s control over Community Houses. Second, they had to negotiate complex parish and diocesan politics as well as deal with priests and bishops who resisted any attempts of outsiders to have influence over the Catholics in their jurisdictions. Finally, they had to fight for respect from other women activists who viewed Catholics as backward, anti-feminist and possibly un-American. Ultimately, these problems stymied the ability of Catholic laywomen to achieve their potential on the national stage.
Date Range: 2011
Location: American Historical Association Meeting, Boston, MA


“Religion, Race, and Catholic Women’s Community Work in San Antonio, Texas, 1918-1924”
Grant details: FT-56922-09
Title: “Religion, Race, and Catholic Women’s Community Work in San Antonio, Texas, 1918-1924”
Author: Jeanne Petit
Abstract: This paper will examine the racial dynamics in the religious work of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and the women of the National Catholic War Council (NCWC). During World War I, the YWCA established an immigrant aid station to do outreach work among Mexican Americans in San Antonio, Texas. Fearing that the evangelical Protestant group would try to proselytize Hispanic Catholics, the Women’s Committee of the NCWC established a National Catholic Community House in San Antonio soon after. Both organizations sent native-born, Euro-American women to run their programs, but these workers expressed strikingly different attitudes towards the Mexican Americans among whom they were working. The YWCA women framed their work as one of breaking down racial barriers. As one YWCA field worker said, “there is no more important work that can be done in the South and Southwest than the obliteration of racial prejudice which now exists between American and the Mexican immigrant.” The women who ran the National Catholic Community House, on the other hand, established policies that maintained racial hierarchies. When one NCWC worker was seen in public with a young Mexican-American man, her superior said, “This is a great mistake in this community as the Mexicans are not accepted as equals, and anyone seen in public with them handicaps herself and brings criticism on the work.”
Date Range: June, 2011
Location: Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Amherst, MA


“Competing for the Souls of Catholic Immigrants: The Immigration Work of the National Council of Catholic Women, 1918-1929”
Grant details: FT-56922-09
Title: “Competing for the Souls of Catholic Immigrants: The Immigration Work of the National Council of Catholic Women, 1918-1929”
Author: Jeanne Petit
Abstract: This paper examines how laywomen of the NCCW engaged in immigration work. I begin with an analysis of the local work NCCW women did with Italian and Polish immigrants in the post World War I period and then turn to the ways NCCW women participated in national immigration debates in the 1920s. As Weadick’s quote reveals, the women of the NCCW were motivated by desire to protect immigrants from non-Catholic influences. But the speeches, reports, and private correspondence of the NCCW members reveal other motives as well. They sought to be as respected as other native-born American reformers when it came to debates about Americanization, restriction and quotas while proving to the all-male hierarchy that Catholic women needed a national presence in order to defend Church interests. Overall, by competing for the souls of Catholic immigrants, the women of the NCCW were also making a case for their right to speak as both American citizens and as essential members of the American Catholic Church.
Date Range: June, 2014
Location: Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Toronto, ON


“Protestants, Catholics, and Jews in World War I America: The 1918 United War Work Campaign”
Grant details: FT-56922-09
Title: “Protestants, Catholics, and Jews in World War I America: The 1918 United War Work Campaign”
Author: Jeanne Petit
Abstract: This paper examined the ways the YMCA, the Knights of Columbus, and the Jewish Welfare Board became involved in war work during World War I and ultimately participated in an interfaith fundraising campaign, called The United War Work Campaign.
Date Range: 2015
Location: Organization of American Historians, St. Louis, MO


Conference Co-chair, Human Trafficking in Early America
Grant details: FT-61131-13
Title: Conference Co-chair, Human Trafficking in Early America
Author: Richard Bell
Abstract: None available
Date Range: Apr. 23-25, 2015
Location: McNeil Center for Early American Studies, University of Pennsylvania


African Slavery in the Portuguese World
Grant details: FT-61468-14
Title: African Slavery in the Portuguese World
Author: Daniel B. Domingues da Silva
Abstract: Graduate lecture part of the seminar "From Demographic to Social HIstory: Social Groups and the Circulation of People in the Portuguese Empire," held at the New University of Lisbon, Portugal, on May 20, 2014.
Date Range: 05/20/2014
Location: New University of Lisbon, Portugal


“‘Gloomy Finland’ and the Russian Imperial Gothic”
Grant details: FT-61594-14
Title: “‘Gloomy Finland’ and the Russian Imperial Gothic”
Author: Valeria Sobol
Abstract: This talk is based on one of the chapters from Professor Valeria Sobol’s book in progress, Haunted Empire: The Gothic and the Russian Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850. The book explores the connection between the Gothic and empire in Russian literature, focusing on the portrayal of Northern and Southern imperial borderlands as uncanny spaces. In this lecture, Professor Sobol will discuss the image of “gloomy” and Gothic Finland constructed in Russian literary and ethnographic publications of the 1840s. While being intimately linked to Russian foundational narratives, such the “invitation of the Varangians” and the construction of St. Petersburg, Finland emerged as an exotic and mysterious land after its incorporation into the Russian empire in the early nineteenth century. Finland’s ambivalent status in the Russian cultural imagination, along with the Gothic connotations of its majestic sublime landscape and its reputation as a “land of wizards,” made it a particularly apt setting for the Russian imperial uncanny. The lecture will offer a brief analysis of Vladimir Odoevsky’s novella “The Salamander” (1844) meant to demonstrate this function of Finland in Russian Gothic literature. While most ethnographic and literary texts depict the Finns as a magic-prone, semi-mythological people destined by both history and geography to be ruled by others and enthusiastically embracing the Russian civilizational mission, Odoevsky offers a far more complex and darker picture, using the narrative of the conquest of Finland to critique both Russia’s historical path and Western modernity more generally.
Date Range: 09/26/2017
Location: Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center, University of Illinois
Primary URL: https://calendars.illinois.edu/detail/7?eventId=33283765


“Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850.”
Grant details: FT-61594-14
Title: “Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850.”
Author: Valeria Sobol
Abstract: This talk will introduce my new book project, Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850, in which I investigate the connection between the Gothic elements found in numerous Russian literary works of the period and their imperial context. I argue that the persistent presence of Gothic tropes in Russian literature is not a just a tribute to a fashionable Western literary trend, as it is often interpreted; rather, I read it as a key literary form that dramatizes deep historical and cultural tensions, unique to the Russian imperial situation. Focusing on two spaces of internal otherness that figure prominently in the Russian Gothic—the Baltic/Scandinavian “North” and the Ukrainian “South,”—I attempt to reconstruct the specifically Russian tradition of the “imperial uncanny,” a fictional space into which the Russian empire projected its colonial fantasies and anxieties and where it produced the doubles and monsters that continue to haunt Russia’s historical imagination.
Date Range: April 2016
Location: Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Stanford University


“Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850.”
Grant details: FT-61594-14
Title: “Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850.”
Author: Valeria Sobol
Abstract: In this talk I introduced my new book project, Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850, in which I investigate the connection between the Gothic elements found in numerous Russian literary works of the period and their imperial context. I argue that the persistent presence of Gothic tropes in Russian literature is not a just a tribute to a fashionable Western literary trend, as it is often interpreted; rather, I read it as a key literary form that dramatizes deep historical and cultural tensions, unique to the Russian imperial situation. Focusing on two spaces of internal otherness that figure prominently in the Russian Gothic—the Baltic/Scandinavian “North” and the Ukrainian “South,”—I attempt to reconstruct the specifically Russian tradition of the “imperial uncanny,” a fictional space into which the Russian empire projected its colonial fantasies and anxieties and where it produced the doubles and monsters that continue to haunt Russia’s historical imagination. In this talk, I focused on the "Ukrainian" part of my book and especially the last chapter that examines Panteleimon Kulish's first historical novel _Mikhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago._
Date Range: May 2015
Location: Chair of Slavic Literatures and Cultures, University of Passau, Germany
Primary URL: https://www.phil.uni-passau.de/aktuelles/meldung/detail/haunted-empire-the-russian-literary-gothic-and-the-imperial-ucanny-1750-1850/


“Gothic Ruins: The Ghost of the Ukrainian Past in Panteleimon Kulish’s Mykhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago.”
Grant details: FT-61594-14
Title: “Gothic Ruins: The Ghost of the Ukrainian Past in Panteleimon Kulish’s Mykhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago.”
Author: Valeria Sobol
Abstract: This presentation is part of my book project, Haunted Empire: The Russian Literary Gothic and the Imperial Uncanny, 1790-1850. The book argues that in Russian literature the empire’s peripheries are consistently depicted as dangerous, ambiguous places that destabilize the characters’ imperial identities. They become sites of the imperial uncanny, a fictional space into which the empire projected its colonial fantasies and anxieties and where, through Gothic tropes, it produced the doubles and monsters that continue to haunt Russia’s historical imagination. Haunted Empire focuses on two spaces of internal otherness that figure prominently in the Russian Gothic: the Baltic/Scandinavian “North” and the Ukrainian “South.” In this presentation I will discuss the historical novel Mykhailo Charnyshenko, or Little Russia Eighty Years Ago written by prominent Ukrainian writer Panteleimon Kulish in 1843. The novel attempts to conjure the ghost of the Ukrainian “authentic” and heroic past, before the Russian empire fully incorporated this region in the late eighteenth century, and produces a vision of its relative cultural independence and chivalric tradition in Gothic-fantastic imagery. The mixed reception of the novel in the Russian press, ranging from admiration for its heroic and folkloric motifs to denying Ukraine any historical past whatsoever, encapsulates the imperial fantasies and fears provoked by the literature of the imperial uncanny.
Date Range: 09/30/2014
Primary URL: http://calendars.illinois.edu/detail/2750/32002891


The New Security State: Surveillance, Counter-Surveillance, and Strategies of Resistance
Grant details: FT-61611-14
Title: The New Security State: Surveillance, Counter-Surveillance, and Strategies of Resistance
Author: Belinda Kong and Carlos Rojas (seminar co-chairs)
Abstract: Literature has long been closely imbricated with practices of surveillance. Not only does literary production necessarily rely on practices of observation (either at the level of the individual or a broader collectives, as with the close synergy between the rise of the modern novel and Western imperial projects), literature itself has often been the object of close scrutiny by the state and other corporate entities. In this respect, literary representation anticipates—and is symptomatic of—a broader array of technologically-based surveillance practices that have emerged in the modern period. As technological advances continue to enhance the ability of states and corporations to surveil the public, even as the public is also increasingly able to deploy similar technologies to its own ends—including efforts to surveil the operation of the surveillance apparatus itself. This latter practice of counter-surveillance is particularly evident in the ways that citizen videos (and the public circulation of videos originally produced by the state) have helped precipitate a national debate in the US over police brutality, but it also has much broader ramifications. Our panel will examine some of the implications of these developments as they pertain to the new security state. We are interested not only in how issues of surveillance and counter-surveillance are addressed in literary works, but also how some of the discourses and visual archives generated by these surveillance practices may be approached as virtual literary works in their own right. Potential topics include examinations of state censorship regimes, social media and practices of collective authorship, surveillance video and found footage as a form of textual production, digital archives and shifting loci of identity, practices of exhibitionism and impersonation, selfies and confessional discourses, as well as advances in wearable technologies and cybernetic states.
Date Range: March 18-20, 2016
Location: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Primary URL: https://www.acla.org/sites/default/files/files/Full_Program_Guide_2016.pdf
Primary URL Description: ACLA 2016 conference program


Asian Biocapitals
Grant details: FT-61611-14
Title: Asian Biocapitals
Author: Belinda Kong (seminar chair)
Abstract: The image of rising Asia as a new economic power has by now become a global commonplace, and Asian as well as Asian diasporic writers—from Mohsin Hamid to Tash Aw, Kyung-Sook Shin to Yu Hua—have variously depicted Asian modes of capitalism. Of particular prominence in recent literature is a spotlight on the body in this era of Asian capital. Narratives of cannibalism, organ harvesting, agribusiness, and epidemics abound. Indeed, social scientists have for over a decade called attention to the distinctive ways capitalism intersects with biopolitics in Asia, in such areas as biotechnology and genomics, the organ trade and human trafficking, population control and family planning policies, as well as transformations of bodily life more generally in capitalizing countries. This panel invites papers that explore the theme of “biocapitalism” in contemporary Asian fiction broadly defined, Anglophone or otherwise.
Date Range: March 21-22, 2014
Location: New York University, New York, NY
Primary URL: https://www.acla.org/sites/default/files/files/Full_Program_Guide_2014.pdf
Primary URL Description: ACLA 2014 Conference program


‘Firearms and the Common Law: History and Memory’
Grant details: FZ-231520-15
Title: ‘Firearms and the Common Law: History and Memory’
Author: Jennifer Tucker
Abstract: “Firearms and the Common Law Tradition” was a by-invitation symposium hosted by The Aspen Institute in Washington, DC on Thursday, September 15, 2016, on the history of firearms in society, law and culture. The event was hosted by the Institute’s Health, Medicine and Society Program and supported by funds from Stanford University and Wesleyan University. It was convened by Jennifer Tucker (Associate Professor of History and Science in Society at Wesleyan University) and Barton C. Hacker and Margaret Vining (Curators of Armed Forces History at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History), and brought together not only a select and bipartisan group of historians, but also museum curators, legal scholars, and other experts in the field to explore this important and timely topic. In this symposium, papers explored the history of guns and gun regulation in the common law tradition, with a focus on U.S. history but also with an interdisciplinary and comparative lens. The symposium also addressed topics such as the current state of historical scholarship on firearms history, resources and collaborative research opportunities, and promising areas for future research. The event also included a conversation moderated by Nina Totenberg (NPR) with two eminent legal scholars, Darrell Miller (Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law) and Eugene Volokh (Gary T. Schwartz, Professor of Law, University of California, Los Angeles School of Law), who addressed how and why historical arguments have become important for the judicial debate about guns in America. On the afternoon before the symposium, September 14th, there was a guided tour of the National Firearms Collection at the Smithsonian Museum of American History. The conference resulted in a manuscript proposal and a round-table discussion with museum curators from six firearms collections that will be published in Technology and Culture journal (2017).
Date Range: Sept. 14-15, 2016
Location: The Aspen Institute, Washington DC.
Primary URL: https://www.aspeninstitute.org/events/guns-supreme-court-influence-history/
Secondary URL: http://newsletter.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2016/10/13/tuckerfirearmsandcommonlawtradition/


“Rendering Health: An Environmental History of Industrial Meat and Insulin"
Grant details: FZ-250429-16
Title: “Rendering Health: An Environmental History of Industrial Meat and Insulin"
Author: Matthew Klingle
Abstract: While the discovery of insulin at the University of Toronto in 1922 is a well-documented story, the conversion of that discovery into a widely used and life-saving pharmaceutical therapy is less well known. This seminar paper, based on a chapter of my book in progress, "Sweet Blood: Diabetes and the Changing Nature of Modern Health," explores how the rise of industrial meat production in North America coincided with the rise of the modern pharmaceutical industry. Using Eli Lilly and Company, the first firm to mass produce insulin, as a case study, this seminar paper explores the environmental history of insulin as a product derived from slaughtered animals to regulate human metabolism in an age of chronic disease.
Date Range: March 13, 2018
Location: Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities, Vanderbilt University
Primary URL: https://my.vanderbilt.edu/sciencestudies/
Primary URL Description: Science and Technology Studies Seminar at Vanderbilt University-Home Page
Secondary URL: https://www.vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center/seminars.php
Secondary URL Description: Warren Center Seminars at Vanderbilt University


“Burdened Bodies: Chemical Exposures, Environmental Inequality, and Alternative Etiologies of Diabetes"
Grant details: FZ-250429-16
Title: “Burdened Bodies: Chemical Exposures, Environmental Inequality, and Alternative Etiologies of Diabetes"
Author: Matthew Klingle
Abstract: After the Second World War, diabetes incidence and prevalence, especially its type 2 variant, increased dramatically in North America and across the globe. By the mid-1950s, biomedical and life scientists along with clinicians began advancing alternative etiologies (causes) to explain the rise. One such etiology centered on the modern industrial chemicals in the environment and their effects on animal and human health: endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs) that mimicked or blocked normal hormone functioning, including hormones associated with metabolism such as insulin. This discovery prompted debates over the reliability of longstanding toxicological models to explain exposure and health consequences. Scientific uncertainty also yielded further political challenges to identify, classify, and regulate EDCs. Despite controversies over EDCs and their effects, by the 1980s, environmental justice advocates embraced the “environmental endocrine hypothesis” to clarify health disparities among marginalized communities. This tactic produced new political opportunities to address environmental health injustices but has also generated important questions about using contested scientific information to drive public health inequities. This paper is based on a chapter-in-progress from my book manuscript, "Sweet Blood: Diabetes and the Changing Nature of Modern Health."
Date Range: November 9, 2018
Location: Fishbein Workshop in the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science, University of Chicago
Primary URL: https://fishbein.uchicago.edu/page/program-information
Primary URL Description: Morris Fishbein Center for the History of Science and Medicine, University of Chicago


“Government Song Women": Margaret Valiant, Sidney Robertson, and New Deal Collecting
Grant details: FZ-256604-17
Title: “Government Song Women": Margaret Valiant, Sidney Robertson, and New Deal Collecting
Author: Sheryl Kaskowitz
Abstract: Appearing on the "Documentation and Archival Collections" panel, this paper gave an overview of these two women's collecting activities as part of the Resettlement Administration's music unit, and discussed the unacknowledged contributions that they made to collecting methodologies and to the recording collections at the American Folklife Center.
Date Range: September 26, 2019
Location: Women Documenting the World Symposium, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, DC
Primary URL: http://www.loc.gov/folklife/Symposia/womenethnographers/index.html


Twelve Years a Slave Book Club-AMoA
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Twelve Years a Slave Book Club-AMoA
Author: Ginger Jones
Author: Jerry Sanson
Abstract: LSU-A professors lead a book club discussion of one of the most important slave narratives of all time.
Date Range: 7/2/2016
Location: Epps House, Louisiana State University at Alexandria campus


Help Me to Find My People Book Club-AMoA
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Help Me to Find My People Book Club-AMoA
Author: Erin Greenwald
Abstract: Purchased Lives curator leads book club discussion of Heather Andrea Williams's Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery.
Date Range: 7/16/2016
Location: Alexandria Museum of Art


Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-AMoA
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-AMoA
Author: Daphne Derven
Author: Erin Greenwald
Author: Lori Boyer
Author: Adam Rothman
Abstract: This one-day professional development workshop for educators of grades 7–12 will begin with an in-depth discussion of the scholarship and findings on America and the domestic slave trade from 1808 to 1865, to enhance and expand content knowledge. Curator and project director Erin Greenwald will present the lecture “Taking on the Tough Stuff of History: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade,” followed by a guided tour of the exhibition. The lesson plans and ancillary materials will be the basis for a detailed discussion and exercises designed to build pedagogical strategies and techniques for classroom use. The workshop will wrap up with a lecture by humanities scholar, Adam Rothman (Georgetown), and an open forum discussion on effective teaching about human rights, enslavement, resistance, and controversy.
Date Range: 7/14/2016
Location: Alexandria Museum of Art, 933 Second Street, Alexandria, Louisiana 71301


Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-NCRM
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-NCRM
Author: Erin Greenwald
Author: Daphne Derven
Author: Lori Boyer
Author: Ernestine Jenkins
Author: Edward Ball
Abstract: This one-day professional development workshop for educators of grades 7–12 will begin with an in-depth discussion of the scholarship and findings on America and the domestic slave trade from 1808 to 1865, to enhance and expand content knowledge. Curator and project director Erin Greenwald will present the lecture “Taking on the Tough Stuff of History: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade,” followed by a guided tour of the exhibition. The lesson plans and ancillary materials will be the basis for a detailed discussion and exercises designed to build pedagogical strategies and techniques for classroom use. Ernestine Jenkins (University of Memphis) will provide an overview of the slave trade in Memphis. The workshop will wrap up with a lecture by humanities scholar, Edward Ball, and an open forum discussion on effective teaching about human rights, enslavement, resistance, and controversy.
Date Range: 9/30/2016
Location: National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tennessee, 38103


Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-Bullock
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Purchased Lives Teachers' Workshop-Bullock
Author: Daphne Derven
Author: Erin Greenwald
Author: Jennifer Schwartzberg
Author: Daina Ramey Berry
Abstract: This one-day professional development workshop for educators of grades 7–12 will begin with an in-depth discussion of the scholarship and findings on America and the domestic slave trade from 1808 to 1865, to enhance and expand content knowledge. Curator and project director Erin Greenwald will present the lecture “Taking on the Tough Stuff of History: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade,” followed by a guided tour of the exhibition. The lesson plans and ancillary materials will be the basis for a detailed discussion and exercises designed to build pedagogical strategies and techniques for classroom use. The workshop will wrap up with a lecture by humanities scholar, Daina Berry (University of Texas-Austin), and an open forum discussion on effective teaching about human rights, enslavement, resistance, and controversy.
Date Range: 2/11/2017
Location: Bullock Texas State History Museum. 1800 N. Congress, Austin, Texas 78701


Finding Your Roots-Workshop-Bullock
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Finding Your Roots-Workshop-Bullock
Author: Ashley Stevens
Author: Maria Hammack
Abstract: Join historians and archivists for a conversation on using documents and other materials to discover personal histories, especially for those families fragmented by slavery. Maria Hammack will explore some of the historical resources available at the University of Texas. Her research shines light on Texas as a market for slavery and as a gateway for enslaved men and women who escaped to freedom in Mexico. Ashley Stevens will share resources from the Texas Library and Archives Commission, strategies for individuals attempting to trace their family histories today, and the complications involved in tracking down African-American relatives in the historic record.This program will be held in conjunction with the exhibition, Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808 to 1865 which examines the domestic slave trade – a racialized system of bondage under which millions of men, women, and children lived and labored.
Date Range: 5/13/2017
Location: Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas 78701
Primary URL: https://www.thestoryoftexas.com/visit/calendar/workshop-finding-your-roots-20170513


Traces of Texas Slavery-Bullock
Grant details: GI-234952-16
Title: Traces of Texas Slavery-Bullock
Author: Andrew Torget
Author: Nancy Bercaw
Author: Mary Elliott
Author: Maria Franklin
Abstract: Interpreting American slavery and its consequences from a variety of academic perspectives. Join scholars for an exploration of slavery and its role in our shared history. What does the historical record tell us about slavery and what were its repercussions? Discover for yourself with guidance through the layers of complexity and nuance in Texas and the nation. Speakers at the event will highlight the deep and lasting impacts of slavery on Texas through analysis of historic sources as diverse as artifacts, architecture, documents and descendant interviews.
Date Range: 1/27-1/28/2017
Location: Bullock Texas State History Museum, Austin, Texas
Primary URL: https://www.thestoryoftexas.com/visit/calendar/symposium-traces-of-texas-slavery-20170128


Roberto Burle Marx Guided Tour [K-8 Tour]
Grant details: GI-261125-18
Title: Roberto Burle Marx Guided Tour [K-8 Tour]
Author: Educator: Tai Montanarella, Associate Director of School and Out-of-School Programs
Abstract: Explore ways artist Burle Marx fused modern Brazilian culture, and native plant diversity to create distinct landscape designs. Create nature-inspired art
Date Range: June 11-14, 2019
Location: The New York Botanical Garden
Primary URL: http://www.nybg.org
Primary URL Description: Main NYBG website
Secondary URL: https://www.nybg.org/learn/schools-teachers/class-trips
Secondary URL Description: Webpage with specific information about the education program.


Observe & Create [K-8 Workshop]
Grant details: GI-261125-18
Title: Observe & Create [K-8 Workshop]
Author: Educator: Tai Montanarella, Associate Director of School and Out-of-School Programs
Abstract: Explore ways artist Burle Marx fused modern Brazilian culture, and native plant diversity to create distinct landscape designs. Create nature-inspired art
Date Range: June 11-14, 2019
Location: The New York Botanical Garden
Primary URL: http://www.nybg.org
Primary URL Description: Main NYBG website
Secondary URL: https://www.nybg.org/learn/schools-teachers/class-trips
Secondary URL Description: Webpage with specific information about the education program.


The Art of Science [Teacher Education Institute]
Grant details: GI-261125-18
Title: The Art of Science [Teacher Education Institute]
Author: Educator: Judith Hutton, Manager of Teacher Professional Development
Abstract: Explore ways artist Burle Marx fused modern art, Brazilian culture and native plant diversity to create distinct landscape designs using bold color and geometric forms. Explore how forms found in nature can provide an inquiry-based framework for learning and art making.
Date Range: July 22-27, 2019
Location: The New York Botanical Garden
Primary URL: http://www.nybg.org
Primary URL Description: Main NYBG website
Secondary URL: http://childed.nybg.org/event/the-art-of-scienceroberto-burle-marx/2403304
Secondary URL Description: Webpage with specific information about the education program.


Agenda for GSC Orientation Workshop (Empathy Theme)
Grant details: GW-259303-18
Title: Agenda for GSC Orientation Workshop (Empathy Theme)
Author: PPO staff and GSC advisors
Abstract: Copy of the two-day workshop agenda
Date Range: September 6-7. 2018
Location: Chicago, IL
Primary URL: https://s3.amazonaws.com/ala-ppo-general/trht/FinalAgenda_EmpathyWorkshop_Sept2018.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to PDF of agenda


Agenda for GSC Orientation Workshop (Heroism Theme)
Grant details: GW-259303-18
Title: Agenda for GSC Orientation Workshop (Heroism Theme)
Author: ALA PPO and GSC advisors
Abstract: Agenda for the two-day workshop for libraries selected to host a GSC series on "What Makes a Hero? Self, Society and Rising to the Occasion."
Date Range: November 15-16, 2018.
Location: Chicago, IL
Primary URL: https://s3.amazonaws.com/ala-ppo-general/gschero/workshop/Agenda_HeroismWorkshop_November2018.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to workshop agenda, from GSC website.


Saving New Sounds: Listening to The Sonic Web
Grant details: HAA-255979-17
Title: Saving New Sounds: Listening to The Sonic Web
Author: Jeremy Wade Morris
Abstract: Music and sound have been integral parts of the Web’s development. Even if computers and network technologies in the early 1990s were limited in their capacities to produce, distribute and present sound, a variety of communities and companies found ways to use the Web towards sonic ends. From early websites where users traded sound-related texts (MIDI files, song lyrics, guitar tablature, etc.) and the noises of new technologies (e.g. the sound of the dial-up modems, bulletin board system welcome tones, etc.) to higher-bandwidth forms of audio (e.g. file sharing, Flash soundtracks, web games, mp3 downloads, streaming music, podcasts, etc.), the Web’s sounds have shaped the economic, industrial, legal and cultural logics of the platform. Despite this rich sonic past, histories of the Web generally focus on the visual. We track websites over time, eras of design styles and stages of technical innovation. What if we amplified this knowledge of the Web’s visual and technical history by listening to it as well?
Date Range: 06/26/2018
Location: Xi’an, China


Kerkenes and CRANE: Collaborative Research and New Endeavours
Grant details: HAA-256218-17
Title: Kerkenes and CRANE: Collaborative Research and New Endeavours
Author: Scott Branting
Abstract: The use of cutting-edge digital techniques has been a hallmark of the Kerkenes Project (kerkenesproject.org) since its inception in 1993. Such technologies are essential to integrative research at this large and complex late Iron Age city. Over the past 26 years a wide variety of new and emerging techniques have been developed and applied at this important site in Turkey. This report details the historical developement and future directions of digital work at Kerkenes, including work being done in collaboration with the DATCH Project.
Date Range: 3/16/2019
Location: Computational Resources on the Ancient Near East Meeting in Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Native Voices
Grant details: HAA-258754-18
Title: Native Voices
Abstract: EMPOWERING NATIVE VOICES LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, founder of the first resistance camp at Standing Rock, joins Native American and First Nations language teachers for a two-day conference at Penn focused on the revitalization of Indigenous languages and culture. Last month, the Penn community welcomed a group of research partners from Native American and First Nations tribal communities for two days of meetings, workshops, and a lecture presented by the Penn Language Center’s Educational Partnerships with Indigenous Communities, or EPIC.
Date Range: April 2019
Primary URL: http://https://omnia.sas.upenn.edu/story/empowering-native-voices


Digital Index of Native American Archaeology Workshop
Grant details: HAA-261214-18
Title: Digital Index of Native American Archaeology Workshop
Abstract: Workshop to examine the utility of the Digital Index of Native American Archaeology to Indigenous nations.
Date Range: August 8-9, 2019
Location: University of California Berkeley


California Indian History Curriculum Coalition Summit Meeting
Grant details: HAA-261214-18
Title: California Indian History Curriculum Coalition Summit Meeting
Abstract: The California Indian History Curriculum Summit is a working group attempting to meet the mandate of the State of California to supply curriculum on Indigenous American history for the state of California, K-12.
Date Range: August 9, 2019
Location: Sacramento, California


Linked Open Greek Pottery: Kerameikos.org
Grant details: HAA-261261-18
Title: Linked Open Greek Pottery: Kerameikos.org
Author: Tyler Jo Smith
Author: Ethan Gruber
Author: Renee Gondek
Abstract: An overview of the project and summary of progress to date (March 2019).
Date Range: March 18, 2019
Location: NEH Project Director's Meeting
Secondary URL Description: DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2597608


Kerameikos.org: A Network Science Approach tot he Study of Greek Pottery
Grant details: HAA-261261-18
Title: Kerameikos.org: A Network Science Approach tot he Study of Greek Pottery
Author: Ethan Gruber
Author: Renee Gondek
Author: Tyler Jo Smith
Abstract: A description of the project parameters and goals for a mixes audience of archaeologists, anthropologists, and digital humanists.
Date Range: March 22, 2019


Visualization and the Holocaust
Grant details: HAA-261290-18
Title: Visualization and the Holocaust
Author: Organized by Paul B. Jaskot
Abstract: Public conference with keynotes and paper sessions by Holocaust Ghettos Project team members, other members of the Holocaust Geographies Collaborative, and invited artists and cartographers. The two-day conference was followed by a one-day intensive brainstorming session to develop ideas for visualizing the Holocaust.
Date Range: January 17-19, 2019
Location: Duke University, Nasher Art Museum, and Duke Wired! Digital Art History Lab
Primary URL: http://www.dukewired.org/visualization-and-the-holocaust/


Dancing Digital
Grant details: HAA-263773-19
Title: Dancing Digital
Author: Rebecca Salzer
Abstract: This NEH grant supported a 3-day symposium at the University of Alabama that brought together 19 dance scholars, educators, archivists, curators, and legal and systems design specialists to discuss how to improve and create access to online dance resources for scholars and educators. In short presentations, roundtables, and discussions, participants addressed the project’s guiding questions and created a draft blueprint for a pilot dance resource. Proceedings were recorded and notated by a graduate student scribe.
Date Range: May 13-16, 2019
Location: The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
Primary URL: N/A


Covert Empire: The CIA and the Third World in the Global Cold War
Grant details: HB-251183-17
Title: Covert Empire: The CIA and the Third World in the Global Cold War
Author: Hugh Wilford
Abstract: This conference presentation explored the continuities between late British imperialism and U.S. interventions in the Cold War post-colonial world, particularly with regard to intimate personal relations.
Date Range: October 2019
Location: North American Society for Intelligence History, Conference, Washington, DC


Covert Empire: The CIA and U.S. Power in the Global Cold War
Grant details: HB-251183-17
Title: Covert Empire: The CIA and U.S. Power in the Global Cold War
Author: Hugh Wilford
Abstract: This seminar presentation explored continuities between late British imperialism and U.S. interventions in the Cold War post-colonial world, particularly with regard to intimate personal relations.
Date Range: October 2019
Location: History Department Research Seminar, California State University, Long Beach


Ancient Greek Philosophers on Economics
Grant details: HB-257208-18
Title: Ancient Greek Philosophers on Economics
Author: Etienne Helmer
Abstract: The purpose of my research is to portrait the ancient Classical and Hellenistic philosophy on economics. Such a project presupposes, first of all, to examine the prejudice according to which ancient philosophy on economics is either inexistent or embryonic. Many texts, on the contrary, show the interest of ancient thinkers on economic phenomena. I intend to show that the ancient Greek economic thought does not take the form of the autonomous science of which we are today familiar, but obeys another form of coherence and another rationality, based on philosophy. The thesis on which this project is based is the following: if the ancient economy is no doubt, according to the term of K. Polanyi, "embedded" in the other institutions of the social life, in particular the moral and political institutions, this integration, far from signifying the dissolution of the economy in other practical spheres, means on the contrary its practical and theoretical centrality for a large number of classical Greek and Hellenistic philosophers.
Date Range: October-November 2018
Location: EHESS (Paris, France)
Primary URL: http://www.anhima.fr/spip.php?page=recherche&recherche=Helmer


Philosophie antique de l'économie / Ancient Philosophy on Economics
Grant details: HB-257208-18
Title: Philosophie antique de l'économie / Ancient Philosophy on Economics
Author: Etienne Helmer
Abstract: The purpose of my talks is to portrait the ancient classical and hellenistic philosophy of economics. Such a project presupposes, first of all, to distance from the prejudice according to which ancient philosophy does not deal with economics or does it in an insignificant way. My claim is, on the contrary, that ancient thought on economics is based on philosophy rather than on science. The assumption on which my project is based is the following: if the ancient economy is no doubt, according to the term of K. Polanyi, "integrated" (embedded) in the other institutions of the social life, in particular the moral and political institutions, this integration, far from meaning the dissolution of economy into other practical spheres, rather means instead its practical and theoretical centrality for a large number of Greek philosophers of the classical and hellenistic periods.
Date Range: September-Decembre 2018
Location: EHESS (Paris, France)
Primary URL: http://www.anhima.fr/spip.php?page=recherche&recherche=Helmer


"On Un-Gendering Evil: Theodicy and Women in the Early Modern Period"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "On Un-Gendering Evil: Theodicy and Women in the Early Modern Period"
Author: Jill Graper Hernandez
Abstract: This invited paper debunks the now wide-spread claim that approaches to concrete evil are committed to a "gendered" conception of evil in the world. By looking at the views of concrete evil held by Mary Astell, Margaret Cavendish, Catharine Macaulay, and Mary Wollstonecraft-- women in the early modern period of philosophy who each are committed attempt to battle concrete, atrocious harm-- today's ethicists can focus on transformative practices to eradicate horrendous evil.
Date Range: September 17-18, 2016
Location: University of Massachusetts-Lowell, Society of Analytical Feminism
Primary URL: https://sites.google.com/site/analyticalfeminism/


"Existential Hope: A Transmuted Goods Reply to the Problem of Evil"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Existential Hope: A Transmuted Goods Reply to the Problem of Evil"
Author: Jill Graper Hernandez
Abstract: This invited paper observes that the success of the atrocity paradigm’s problem of evil argument depends upon the transmutativity aspect of atrocities (i.e., that atrocious harms irrevocably negatively alter the great good of the sufferer’s life). I argue that transmutativity cuts both ways, and that existential hope (as conceived by Gabriel Marcel) functions as a transmuted good by restoring dignity to those who suffer. If hope is a transmuted good, overrides the consequences of atrocious harm, and emerges from a system of goods that cannot be explained by the atrocity paradigm, then the atheist’s conclusion that evil ought to be rescued from theism cannot follow. Existential hope thus serves as a unique response to the problem of evil.
Date Range: May 19-21, 2016
Location: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX; Southwest Seminar in Continental Philosophy
Primary URL: http://philosophy.tamu.edu/events/swscp2016/


"Early Modern (Female) Theodicy, Almost without Apology"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Early Modern (Female) Theodicy, Almost without Apology"
Author: Jill Hernandez
Abstract: This invited main-program APA paper argues that early modern women made significant, unique contributions to the philosophy of religion. Further, I contend that, upon analysis, their views map onto contemporary atheist conceptions of evil while forwarding theodical arguments. I then conclude by sketching out a framework for a new theory of goods, "transmuted goods", which can combat atrocious harm in the world.
Date Range: March 30-April 3, 2016
Location: American Philosophical Association Pacific Division (main program), San Francisco, CA
Primary URL: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.apaonline.org/resource/resmgr/Pacific2016/P2016_Meeting_Program_web.pdf


"Love and Atrocity: Can Transmuted Goods Explain Obligations?"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Love and Atrocity: Can Transmuted Goods Explain Obligations?"
Author: Jill Graper Hernandez
Abstract: All ethicists, even atrocity paradigm atheists, want a moral theory to explain why we have positive moral duties to love victims of atrocities. We should also expect that the atrocity paradigm could account for the ability of some sufferers to recreate meaning in their lives after an atrocity. The paradigm struggles to do either. Instead, certain moral goods—goods like forgiveness, altruism, generosity, or kindness-- provide evidence against the paradigm's view that atrocious harms deprive a person from living a tolerable life. This paper argues that love, as a foundational ‘transmuted good’ that functions within a part of a correlative moral system, better explains our moral obligation to others, a universal duty to preserve human dignity, and the ability to create meaning after an atrocity. The result is either that the atrocity paradigm is a flawed moral system, or that theism provides a stronger account of moral obligation to prevent atrocity.
Date Range: May 6-7. 2016
Location: The Meaning of Love Conference, Biola University (La Mirada, CA)
Primary URL: https://cct.biola.edu/static/media/downloads/the-meaning-of-love-conference-program.pdf


"Marcel's Hope as a Transmuted Good: A Reply to the Atrocity Paradigm"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Marcel's Hope as a Transmuted Good: A Reply to the Atrocity Paradigm"
Author: Jill Hernandez
Abstract: This paper reveals an antinomy in existentialist Gabriel Marcel’s conception of evil, and argues that Marcel’s view of a feeling of hopeful existence is better understood by working through the antinomy. Although Marcel clearly argues that evil and suffering are facets of our lived experiences in the world, he is much less clear about whether evil is solvable and what the implications of evil’s presence in the world are for what can we can reasonably hope for. In the following, I map out Marcel’s conception of evil onto his fundamental distinction between problem and mystery, show that the distinction creates two effective methodologies for dealing with evil in the world (the problem approach and the mystery approach), draw the antinomy of evil based on these methodologies, and then demonstrate that the antinomy can be dissolved through an existentially-engaged, communal encounter with evil. Dissolving the antinomy facilitates Marcel’s vision of transforming the encounter of evil through a love that brings a feeling of hope—for all, regardless of existential or theistic commitment.
Date Range: December 3-4, 2015
Location: Queen's College (Flushing, NY), Redemption of Feeling: The Religious Existentialists Conference
Primary URL: http://www.apaonline.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=633645


"Intersubjectivity and Narrative Theodicy; Atrocity and O'Connor"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Intersubjectivity and Narrative Theodicy; Atrocity and O'Connor"
Author: Jill Hernandez
Abstract: This paper will bridge the gap between the analytic, theodical use of second-personal narratives and the atrocious harm arguments of atheists through a relational narrative account that borrows heavily from Flannery O’Connor’s sense of intersubjectivity. Although the project of using narrative as a way to do theodicy should be preserved, this paper will cast doubt on the ability of second-personal narratives to meet the criticisms of the atrocity paradigm, and will instead suggest that first-person plural standpoint can better rescue narrative as a theodical tool. The conditions of intersubjectivity found within O’Connor require more than mere interconnectedness among characters, and more than seeing others as only ‘others,’ but as intrinsically bound up with the sense of self . The result is such that, for narratives to be efficacious in theodicy, they must facilitate: a)mutual respect between agents, which is absent between the empowered and the oppressed; b) an univocal relationship between agents when a moral claim is made-- although power relationships are frequently equivocal and, for the oppressed, implicitly threatening; and c) a felicity condition in which the addressee has reason to respond to the claim made by the narrative, even though feminists would argue that such a consideration disproportionately negatively impacts women.
Date Range: September 17-19, 2015
Location: Georgia State College, Flannery O'Connor and Other Southern Writers Conference
Primary URL: http://www.gcsu.edu/sites/files/page-assets/node-906/attachments/program.pdf


"Can Leibniz's Theodicy Account for Atrocious Harm?"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Can Leibniz's Theodicy Account for Atrocious Harm?"
Author: Jill Hernandez
Abstract: Rather than assess the merits of the contemporary distinction between abstract and concrete evil, then, we can use it to revisit Leibnizian theodicy to answer, first, whether there is textual support in Theodicy for the distinction, and second, if Leibniz’s theodicy can justify divine perfection in the face of atrocious harms. Delineating between concrete, particular and concrete, atrocious harms has several benefits for Leibniz scholarship. This allows Leibnizian theodicy to rigorously (rather than incidentally) engage with concrete evil—and so the Theodicy can duck the atheist’s contention that it fails to engage with the lived experience of suffering. My distinction also removes the burden from Leibniz’s theodicy to demonstrate that, for each person who suffers, evil contributes to the good whole of the individual’s life, since the concrete evils that are explainable by theodicy are a genre, rather than an instance. Finally, it preserves Leibniz’s view that the goodness of God extends to the particular, relative to the whole, if God’s best possible world includes a system of goods that can mitigate the system of atrocious harm perpetuated by evil human action.
Date Range: July 3-6, 2015
Location: Lampeter Campus of University of Wales, Trinity Saint David


"Narrative and Suffering: the Problem of Standpoint"
Grant details: HB-50471-14
Title: "Narrative and Suffering: the Problem of Standpoint"
Author: Jill Graper Hernandez
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Philosophers of religion have recently argued that second-personal narratives can be an effective theodical tool to defend divine perfection against the problem of evil. What it means to suffer, for example, is best conveyed by a second-personal standpoint, and narratives are able to connote this meaning in a way which resists propositional form.1 Critics—especially atheist feminist proponents of a secularized concept of ‘evil’—contend that theists can never successfully use narrative as a defense against the problem of evil because Scripture fails to speak to those who truly suffer from (especially) atrocious harms, and the narratives are never spoken by them since all of the narrators within the biblical text are men.2 Theologians have been particularly keen to show that narratives can produce theological knowledge3, but this paper will argue that philosophy’s theodical use of narrative accounts can bridge the gap between the atrocious harm arguments of contemporary atheists and the epistemic function of theology’s second-person standpoint. A caution will be given to philosophers, however: Although the project of utilizing narrative as a way to do theodicy should be preserved, this paper will cast doubt on the ability of second-personal narratives to effectively answer the criticisms elicited by the atrocity paradigm, and will instead suggest that a first-person epistemic standpoint can better rescue narrative as a theodical tool.
Date Range: July 16-20, 2014
Location: Berkeley Dominican School of Philosophy & Theology Conference, Berkeley, CA


Beowulf: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Beowulf: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar
Author: Michael D.C. Drout.
Abstract: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar, highlighting the application of Lexos to digitized texts.
Date Range: December 28, 2014-January 2, 2015 and May 13-15, 2016
Location: Schooling for Life, Los Angeles, CA.


Lexomics Across the Academy
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Lexomics Across the Academy
Author: Mike Drout, Mark LeBlanc, and three Wheaton undergraduates
Abstract: Hands-on sessions for faculty at Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU, Charlotte, NC) over a two-day period.
Date Range: Oct. 5-7, 2016
Location: JCSU, Charlotte, NC


Text Analysis with Lexos
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Text Analysis with Lexos
Author: Scott Kleinman
Abstract: Hands-on Lexos workshop in Nepal.
Date Range: June 2017
Location: Institute of Advanced Communication, Education and Research, Kathmandu, Nepal


Bringing Computational Thinking to the Digital Humanities: Introducing Students to Explorations of Digitized Texts
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Bringing Computational Thinking to the Digital Humanities: Introducing Students to Explorations of Digitized Texts
Author: Mark D. LeBlanc
Abstract: Our work on Lexos as an entry-level tool for scholars of digitized texts is presently funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and reflects six years of development and testing, including use in our interdisciplinary undergraduate courses. More information on our successful use in the classroom and in our own research (Beowulf, classical Chinese, Tolkien, Poe, etc) is available at our website: http://lexomics.wheatoncollege.edu. The software for Lexos is available on our github repo: https://github.com/WheatonCS/Lexos. Introductions and Agenda (which we will modify as we go :) I. Lexos play (50 minutes) II. Review of computational techniques and “teachable moments” (30 minutes) III. Discussion of outreach to the Digital Humanities on our campuses (20 minutes) IV. Pair-programming – probing a “fav” set of texts (50 minutes)
Date Range: April 7, 2017
Location: CCSCNE 2017 - The College of Saint Rose, Albany, NY
Primary URL: http://lexos.wheatoncollege.edu


Lexos: Easing Entry to Computational Studies with Digitized Texts
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Lexos: Easing Entry to Computational Studies with Digitized Texts
Author: Mark D. LeBlanc, Kate Boylan, Mike Drout
Abstract: In our experience, scholars who might like to perform computational analysis in their areas of expertise and/or wish to teach their students how to do so become discouraged too early in the game. This workshop will provide hands-on exposure to and practice with the free, open-source, web-based tool Lexos, including course materials that we have used in our interdisciplinary courses; our software is available at our GitHub repo. The workshop goal is to lower the barriers required for computer-assisted text analysis over a broad range of texts, including pre-modern and non-Western languages. Lexos requires no prerequisities to use, in fact a take away from the workshop is to stimulate your ideas for the many different ways to introduce students to computational analyses of texts. Participants are encouraged to arrive with a folder of text files of interest (raw text files, .txt, HTML, or XML required; .pdf and .docx formats are not handled). Our work on Lexos as an entry-level tool for scholars of digitized texts is presently funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Wheaton College (Norton, MA) and the Center for the Digital Humanities at California State University, Northridge reflects six years of development and testing, including use in our undergraduate classrooms. More information on our successful use in the classroom and in our own research (presently in Beowulf, classical Chinese, Tolkien, Poe, etc.) is available at our website. This session will be taught by Wheaton College’s Michael D.C. Drout, Professor of English, Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval; Mark D. LeBlanc, Prof. of Computer Science; and Kate Boylan, Digital Initiatives Librarian.
Date Range: March 20, 2017
Location: Boston College Libraries Coffee & Code series, O’Neill Library, Digital Studio
Primary URL: https://ds.bc.edu/2017-spring-events/


Veni, Vidi, Scripsi: Ancient Graffiti in the Latin Classroom
Grant details: HD-248610-16
Title: Veni, Vidi, Scripsi: Ancient Graffiti in the Latin Classroom
Author: M. B. Smith
Author: M. Rebman
Abstract: Veni, Vidi, Scripsi: Ancient Graffiti in the Latin Classroom This workshop will explore the different strategies in using ancient graffiti to teach grammar, vocabulary, culture, and critical thinking. Participants will discuss the Ancient Graffiti Project and its new website as a companion in the Latin classroom. There will also be an open discussion for teachers to share their own strategies, experiences, and ideas about teaching ancient graffiti. As Latin teachers, we are constantly asked questions regarding the relevance of the subject we teach. The usual stock answers revolve around the SAT, the possibility of going to medical or law school, or how it allows one to learn other languages more easily. This, however, isn’t enough to keep students engaged anymore. It is cultural relevance that appears to be the answer. Students are more willing to engage when they can relate to the concept being taught. But how can students connect their lives to Roman lives? The answer: ancient graffiti. The Ancient Graffiti Project collects graffiti from Herculaneum and Pompeii and displays its findings online, making the collection accessible to the public. The project provides an opportunity for students to view the Romans not taught in textbooks or seen in works by Caesar, Cicero, or Virgil. Graffiti encourages a glimpse into the common man’s life that helps students better understand the Romans. Students who use ancient graffiti begin to realize that the Romans are not so different from themselves. It is here that the learning really begins.
Date Range: 04/06/2017
Location: Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS) Annual Meeting
Primary URL: http://forms.camws.org/Abstracts2017/Workshop.Graffiti.pdf


Recording and Documenting the Chromatic Information of Architectural Heritage
Grant details: HD-50176-07
Title: Recording and Documenting the Chromatic Information of Architectural Heritage
Author: Wei Yan
Abstract: One essential approach in preserving architectural heritage is the documentation of 3D geometries and surface textures of historic buildings. For example, precise colour information, excluding lighting effects, is an intrinsic property of the surface materials of building interiors and exteriors. However, while colour information has been recorded for small sample areas, it has not been accurately documented on the scale of entire building surfaces. This is critical, because building materials decay and their colours fade with time. The goal of this project is to develop a method to assist in recording and documenting the chromatic information of interiors and exteriors of historic buildings with low cost and high efficiency. The method takes advantage of emerging high dynamic range imaging (HDRI) technology, which can store rich information about colour and illumination through digital photography. By recording the colour information, in addition to the geometry and texture information obtained through other existing technologies, we can achieve more complete documentation for architectural heritage. In this paper, we discuss an overview of the problem and present our algorithms for utilizing computer vision techniques to retrieve chromatic information of historic buildings. We also present and discuss our experiments and results of applying our method to studies of lab objects and the Hall of Supreme Harmony in the Forbidden City, Beijing.
Date Range: 10/18/2010
Location: Texas A&M University
Primary URL: http://symposium.arch.tamu.edu/2010/presentations/recording-and-documenting-chromatic-information-ar/
Primary URL Description: College symposium website


A Numerate Film History? Cinemetrics Looks at Griffith, Sennett and Chaplin (1909-1917)
Grant details: HD-51106-10
Title: A Numerate Film History? Cinemetrics Looks at Griffith, Sennett and Chaplin (1909-1917)
Author: Yuri Tsivian
Author: Daria Khitrova
Author: Mike Baxter
Abstract: The digital age opens film history both to newer tools and the challenges of statistics. One such tool is Cinemetrics, a sizable database of shot lengths that enables users to amass and process numeric data related to film editing. The one-day conference “A Numerate Film History?” is about the possible promises—or traps—that emerge as a result of the encounter between century-old films and the computational statistics of today. Conducted under the aegis of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and co-sponsored by the Film Studies Center, the conference features Professor Tom Gunning and Professor Yuri Tsivian from Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago and two Neubauer Collegium Visiting Fellows: Michael Baxter, Emeritus Professor of Statistical Archaeology, Nottingham Trent University, UK and Daria Khitrova, Visiting Assistant Professor, University of California, Los Angeles.
Date Range: 3/1/2014
Location: University of Chicago
Primary URL: http://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/events/uc/Cinemetrics-Conference/
Primary URL Description: Neubauer Collegium website


Cinemetrics across Borders
Grant details: HD-51106-10
Title: Cinemetrics across Borders
Author: Yuri Tsivian (organizer); use Primary URL to access list of participants
Abstract: It takes skills to tell a story. What skills it takes depends on the medium we use. Film is the medium of showing. What to show closer? What to show longer? What to show once, and what to show again? Filmmakers have dealt with these problems since the beginning of cinema. Those who study film history today need to have a clear picture of how and why filmmakers made these decisions throughout time. What were D.W. Griffith’s favorite camera set ups in 1914? What year was it that Chaplin learned to cut? Questions like these relate to film editing, and will keep coming up as long as film editing remains art. How many cuts does that seemingly seamless Birdman hide? How did they slice and splice the 12 years of real time in Boyhood? Cinemetrics is a website that helps to puzzle out such questions. Launched in 2005 as a digital tool designed to assess and compare various ways of editing films, Cinemetrics has grown into a global forum on experimental methods in cinema studies. Hundreds of film students and scholars from different countries, each with their own research agenda, submit shot-length and shot-scale data to the Cinemetrics website. For years, we have been comrades-in-arms in cyberspace. Between 2013-2015, the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society has enabled us to talk to each other face to face about the value of Cinemetrics data. As part of this project, from April 30 to May 3, 2015 the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and the Film Studies Center will host the International Conference “Cinemetrics Across Borders” at the University of Chicago, which will bring together filmmakers and scholars from around the world. Co-sponsored by the Adelyn Russell Bogert Fund of the Franke Institute for the Humanities and the Chuck Roven Fund for Cinema and Media Studies.
Date Range: 4/30/2015 - 5/03/2015
Location: University of Chicago
Primary URL: http://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/events/uc/cinemetrics_across_borders/
Primary URL Description: Hosting institution website


"Francesco Petrarca: from manuscript to digital culture"
Grant details: HD-51110-10
Title: "Francesco Petrarca: from manuscript to digital culture"
Author: Nathalie Hester, Massimo Lollini, and Leah Middlebrook
Abstract: “Francesco Petrarca from Manuscript to Digital Culture” was a day-long symposium held in April of 2010. This symposium was instrumental in the successful writing of the grant. Hosted by Massimo Lollini and the Romance Languages Department at the University of Oregon, the event was conceived of in conjunction with the graduate seminar “Humanism and Culture of the Book” co-taught by Massimo Lollini and Leah Middlebrook the spring of 2010 and was attended by an international, multigenerational cohort of scholars and readers.
Date Range: 04/03/2010 - 01/31/2011
Location: University of Oregon
Primary URL: http://journals.library.oregonstate.edu/hsda/issue/view/1/showToc
Primary URL Description: The publication of the Proceedings of the International Symposium, "Francesco Petrarca: from manuscript to digital culture," in January 2011 was partially made possible by the grant.


Preaching, Performance, and Public Space in Medieval and Early Modern England
Grant details: HD-51222-11
Title: Preaching, Performance, and Public Space in Medieval and Early Modern England
Author: Organizer -- John N Wall
Abstract: A symposium for the opening of the Virtual Paul's Cross installation at the James B Hunt Library, NC State University Participants and their paper titles included: Plenary Address -- John Schofield, Archaeologist, St Paul’s Cathedral, London, former Curator of Architecture, Museum of London -- “Reconstructing Medieval St Paul’s Cathedral” Panel Tom Barrie, Professor of Architecture, NC State University -- “The Architecture of the Sacred in Early Modern England” Carol Symes, History, Theatre, Medieval Studies, University of Illinois -- “Sightlines, Soundscapes, and the Shaping of a Medieval Public Sphere.” Heather Hyde Minor, History of Architecture, University of Illinois -- “The St. Paul’s that Wasn’t” Anne MacNeil, History of Music, UNC – Chapel Hill -- “The Way-Back Machine: Digital Tools for Study of the Distant Past”
Date Range: November 5, 2013
Location: James B Hunt Library, NC State University
Primary URL: http://vpcp.chass.ncsu.edu/symposium/
Primary URL Description: Official website of the Virtual Paul's Cross Project


Listening to the “Virtual Paul’s Cross”—Auralizing 17th Century London
Grant details: HD-51222-11
Title: Listening to the “Virtual Paul’s Cross”—Auralizing 17th Century London
Author: Matthew Azevedo
Abstract: We set up the real-time auralization at the Acoustical Society of America’s Spring 2014 meeting in Providence, RI and ran a six-hour listening session where people could come and listen and interact with the simulation. I gave three 30-minute talks about the project (one every two hours), and the remaining time was dedicated to listening. Well over 100 people came to experience the simulation during the day. All the chairs in the main listening area were full for each talk with overflow to the sides, so at least 90 were in attendance for the talks alone. Several people sat and listened for over an hour, which was wonderful to see.
Date Range: May 9, 2014
Location: Providence, RI
Primary URL: http://acousticalsociety.org/sites/default/files/docs/Wednesday_0.pdf
Primary URL Description: Program for the annual meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Providence, RI May 5-9, 2014


Large Scale Text Analysis in the Humanities: Methods and Challenges
Grant details: HD-51244-11
Title: Large Scale Text Analysis in the Humanities: Methods and Challenges
Author: Aditi Muralidharan
Abstract: To tackle increasingly large digitized archives of text, the digital humanities community has responded with an avid interest in text mining and visualization. Everywhere one looks these days, computer scientists are bringing text analysis to humanities scholars with tutorials, workshops, and toolkits. Nevertheless, crucial information is being lost in translation. If text analysis toolkits are to be truly successful, information needs to start flowing the other way and computer scientists must learn from humanities scholars what humanistic text analysis really means. If not, they will continue making "natural" assumptions that do not always translate into the humanities. For example, concepts like "question", "hypothesis", "data", "evidence" are always well-defined in scholars' minds and are universal to all analysis. In the extreme case, this misalignment of basic assumptions could lead to fleets of powerful text analysis tools that nobody knows how to actually apply to humanistic analysis.
Date Range: 2011-09-20
Location: Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, B0131 McKeldin Library, College Park, MD
Primary URL: http://mith.umd.edu/podcast/?podcast=112
Primary URL Description: Podcast and Slides on the Institute's web page.


Teaching App Design and Development
Grant details: HD-51330-11
Title: Teaching App Design and Development
Author: Brett Oppegaard
Author: Will Leurs
Author: Dene Grigar
Author: John Barber
Abstract: A growing area of interest in the digital humanities is the mobile environment, especially projects that take advantage of the affordances of smart phones and tablets. This course, derived from the Mobile Tech Research Initiative of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver (http://van-dtc356.vancouver.wsu.edu/appcamp/), is aimed at assisting participants to: 1) conceptualize the space and special features of mobile devices; 2) develop the architecture, design, and multimedia content production for a mobile project; and 3) understand the coding and programming requirements for mobile devices. By the end of the course, participants will have the information they need for creating projects for the mobile environment and will have completed steps toward the development of their own projects
Date Range: 6/4-8/2012
Location: University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Primary URL: http://dtc-wsuv.org/wp/dhsi/
Primary URL Description: This is the website for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria
Secondary URL: http://dhsi.org/courses.php
Secondary URL Description: This is the website for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria


Fort Vancouver Mobile Team Hosts John Tobiason
Grant details: HD-51330-11
Title: Fort Vancouver Mobile Team Hosts John Tobiason
Author: Brett Oppegaard
Author: Dene Grigar
Abstract: The Fort Vancouver Mobile Team hosted John Tobiason, the Director of New and Social Media for the National Park Service, who visited from Maryland. Among the high points of the two hour meeting: Dene Grigar and Greg Shine presented information on their digital storytelling class the next semester that plans to contribute to the FVM project; Graphic designer Marsha Matta shared her work in the design of the app; Video expert Troy Wayrynen explained his work with the Paul Crane module; and Will Luers, WSUV faculty and video expert, described his apple tree project, among many other presenters. Participants then broke out into small groups to help envision where the project would go during the next year. In the time preceding and following the meeting, FVM leaders Dene Grigar and Brett Oppegaard exchanged ideas with John Tobiason, and established avenues for future endeavors with the National Park Service.
Date Range: 12/12/11
Location: Washington State University Vancouver


Fort Vancouver Mobile Team Hosts John Tobiason
Grant details: HD-51330-11
Title: Fort Vancouver Mobile Team Hosts John Tobiason
Author: Brett Oppegaard
Author: Dene Grigar
Abstract: The Fort Vancouver Mobile Team hosted John Tobiason, the Director of New and Social Media for the National Park Service, who visited from Maryland. Among the high points of the two hour meeting: Dene Grigar and Greg Shine presented information on their digital storytelling class the next semester that plans to contribute to the FVM project; Graphic designer Marsha Matta shared her work in the design of the app; Video expert Troy Wayrynen explained his work with the Paul Crane module; and Will Luers, WSUV faculty and video expert, described his apple tree project, among many other presenters. Participants then broke out into small groups to help envision where the project would go during the next year. In the time preceding and following the meeting, FVM leaders Dene Grigar and Brett Oppegaard exchanged ideas with John Tobiason, and established avenues for future endeavors with the National Park Service.
Date Range: 12/12/11
Location: Washington State University Vancouver


THAT Camp CAA: Contolled Vocabularies and Aggregated Data
Grant details: HD-51640-13
Title: THAT Camp CAA: Contolled Vocabularies and Aggregated Data
Author: Nancy L. Wicker
Abstract: This is working session about “Controlled Vocabularies and Aggregated Data” at the THATCamp associated with the meeting of the College Art Association in 2014. The topic relates to our concerns for “Project Andvari” but also will be of wide interest to other scholars working with large databases of art historical material.
Date Range: 02/10/2014
Location: Chicago, Illinois


Harvard University Runic Colloquium—Project Andvari: A Digital Portal to the Visual World of Early Medieval Northern Europe
Grant details: HD-51640-13
Title: Harvard University Runic Colloquium—Project Andvari: A Digital Portal to the Visual World of Early Medieval Northern Europe
Author: Nancy L. Wicker
Author: Lilla Kopár
Abstract: Project Andvari is an international collaborative project designed to create a digital portal that will provide integrated access to collections of northern European art and artifacts of the fourth through twelfth centuries. The project title Andvari evokes many features of this new research tool. Andvari (Old Norse ‘the careful one’) is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology, where dwarves are associated with arts and crafts. Andvari is the collector of a great treasure and a shape-shifter. Thus his character echoes the idea of a digital portal functioning as an aggregator and its utility in searching artistic elements transformed across media, regions, and cultures. The goal of this presentation is to explain the rationale for and the objectives of Project Andvari. Despite the wealth of the surviving visual culture from early medieval Scandinavia and neighboring areas, primary materials are often difficult to access, scattered in specialized, national collections. Researchers working on artifacts in one medium are often unaware of parallels in another and use different terminology to describe similar elements. Recently, several collections of material restricted by medium, object type, or location have been made available through online catalogues, but these subsets have remained unconnected. Furthermore, the search functions of existing databases are often limiting since they pre-structure material in conventional categories dictated by scholarly traditions. In response to these challenges, Project Andvari will facilitate interdisciplinary research in the northern periphery of medieval Europe, allowing users to study visual culture across media and beyond traditional geographical and disciplinary boundaries.
Date Range: 03/12/2016
Location: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA


Uncle Buddy & an Argument for Collection
Grant details: HD-51768-13
Title: Uncle Buddy & an Argument for Collection
Author: Dene Grigar
Abstract: Grigar, Dene. “Uncle Buddy & an Argument for Collection.” 2015 Narrative Conference. March 2015; Chicago, IL.
Date Range: March 2015
Location: Chicago, IL


Preserving Literature through Documenting Readers’ Experience: The Pathfinders Project
Grant details: HD-51768-13
Title: Preserving Literature through Documenting Readers’ Experience: The Pathfinders Project
Author: Dene Grigar
Author: Stuart Moulthrop
Abstract: Grigar, Dene and Stuart Moulthrop. "Preserving Literature through Documenting Readers’ Experience: The Pathfinders Project." The Electronic Literature Organization 2014 Conference. July 2014; Milwaukee, WI.
Date Range: July 2014
Location: Milwaukee, WI


Digital Humanities and Media Studies: Exploring the Intersections
Grant details: HD-51768-13
Title: Digital Humanities and Media Studies: Exploring the Intersections
Author: Dene Grigar
Abstract: Grigar, Dene. “Digital Humanities and Media Studies: Exploring the Intersections.” The 2014 Society for Cinema andMedia Studies. March 2014; Seattle, WA.
Date Range: March 2014
Location: Seattle, WA


Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Workshop
Grant details: HD-51852-14
Title: Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Workshop
Author: Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan
Author: Felecia Lucht
Author: Laura Kline
Author: Alina Klin
Author: Julie Koehler
Author: Krysta Ryzewski
Abstract: Digital storytelling workshop for Wayne State University students
Date Range: 2/1/2015
Location: Wayne State University, Detroit, MI


Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Workshop
Grant details: HD-51852-14
Title: Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Workshop
Author: Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan
Author: Laura Kline
Author: Alina Klin
Author: Julie Koehler
Author: Krysta Ryzewski
Abstract: Digital storytelling workshop for students, staff, faculty and community members
Date Range: 2/19/2016
Location: Wayne State University, Detroit, MI


Digital Coptic 2 Symposium and Workshop
Grant details: HD-51907-14
Title: Digital Coptic 2 Symposium and Workshop
Abstract: Coptic SCRIPTORIUM hosted a second workshop and symposium on Digital Humanities and Coptic Studies. It took place March 12-13, 2015 at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. This event followed on the workshop in May 2013 at Humboldt University, Berlin. There were no registration fees to attend. Day 1 was a public symposium on Digital Humanities and Coptic Studies. Day 2 was a workshop on Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.
Date Range: March 2015
Location: Georgetown University
Primary URL: http://copticscriptorium.org/workshop2015/index.html


Textual Markup and Humanities Research
Grant details: HJ-50173-14
Title: Textual Markup and Humanities Research
Author: Hilde De Weerdt
Abstract: for the Workshop session in “????????” Markup, Statistics and Analysis
Date Range: 3/20/2015
Location: National Chung Hsing University, Taichung


Textual Markup and Humanities Research
Grant details: HJ-50173-14
Title: Textual Markup and Humanities Research
Author: Hilde De Weerdt
Abstract: Workshop session in “????????” (Markup, Statistics and Analysis)
Date Range: 3/6/2015
Location: National Cheng Gung University, Tainan


MARKUS: Reading and Analyzing Classical Chinese Texts Digitally
Grant details: HJ-50173-14
Title: MARKUS: Reading and Analyzing Classical Chinese Texts Digitally
Author: Hilde De Weerdt
Abstract: for the Workshops on Digital Resources in Chinese Historical, Geographical, and Literary Studies, at AAS-in-Asia Conference, Singapore.
Date Range: 7/18/2014
Location: AAS-in-Asia Conference, Singapore


MARKUS: Reading and Analyzing Classical Chinese Texts Digitally
Grant details: HJ-50173-14
Title: MARKUS: Reading and Analyzing Classical Chinese Texts Digitally
Author: Hilde De Weerdt
Abstract: itnroduction to MARKUS
Date Range: 6/6/2014
Location: International Interdisciplinary Conference on Middle Period China, 800-1400, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA


International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds
Grant details: HJ-50187-14
Title: International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds
Author: Elaine Treharne
Abstract: Session 1631 Title: Stanford's NEH-Funded Global Currents: Feature Modelling and the Medieval Manuscripts Abstract: The NEH-funded project, Stanford Global Currents, is part of an international team of scholars using visual language processing and feature modelling to determine the characteristics of information retrieval tools in a broad corpora of texts. At Stanford, we are focused on a large number of (long) 12th-century English manuscripts and the ways in which Latin, English, and French text is presented through a range of genres and qualities of production; that is, we focus on the characteristics of 100,000 examples of mise-en-page as displayed through network modelling. We hope to reveal exciting new results at Leeds, including the datability of _litterae notabiliores_; the consistency and localisation of the deployment of rubrics and intertextual space; the relative significance of types of enlarged capitals; and a typology of manuscript decoration from c. 1080 to 1220. Sponsor: Stanford Text Technologies Organiser Elaine Treharne, Department of English, Stanford University Moderator/Chair Mark Algee-Hewitt, Department of English, Stanford University Paper -a The Display of Manuscript Data (Language: English) Speaker: Ben Albritton, Center for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Stanford University Indexing Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography Paper -b Managing Manuscripts (Language: English) Speaker: Celena Allen, Center for Spatial & Textual Analysis (CESTA), Stanford University Indexing Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Technology Paper -c Deductive and Inductive Research in Big Data Manuscript Studies (Language: English) Speaker: Matt Aiello, Worcester College, University of Oxford Indexing Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Date Range: July 2016
Location: University of Leeds
Primary URL: http://https://imc.leeds.ac.uk/dbsql02/AQueryServlet?*id=30&*formId=30&*context=IMC&chosenPaperId=NA&sessionId=6607&conference=2016&chosenPaperId=&*servletURI=https://imc.leeds.ac.uk/dbsql02/AQueryServlet
Primary URL Description: Leeds IMC Program


Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Workshop for Minnesota Pakistani community
Date Range: 12/12/2015
Location: Minneapolis, MN


Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Digital storytelling workshop for Hmong Museum board members. Finished stories were donated to the Immigrant Stories collection
Date Range: 03/12/2016-03/13/2016
Location: Minneapolis, MN


Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Remote workshop for DeAnza College in Cupertino, CA
Date Range: 12/02/17
Location: 12/02/17


Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Two-day digital story-making workshop at the Arab American National Museum, Dearborn, MI
Date Range: 10/6-7/16
Location: Arab American National Museum, Dearborn, MI


Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories Digital Storytelling Workshop
Author: Elizabeth Venditto, Erika Lee, Saengmany Ratsabout
Abstract: Two-day Immigrant Stories digital story-making workshop at the San Francisco Public Library
Date Range: 10/22-23/16
Location: San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, CA


The Future of the Library
Grant details: HK-50021-12
Title: The Future of the Library
Author: IMLS
Abstract: Dr. Flanagan was invited to attend a high-level meeting by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This small meeting of approximately 40 colleagues focused on national digital initiatives and the desired impacts of federal funding for libraries.
Date Range: April 2014
Location: NYPL


Big Quilt, Big Data: The AIDS Quilt Touch Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Big Quilt, Big Data: The AIDS Quilt Touch Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: The AIDS Memorial Quilt was created 25 years ago as a work of community activism to protest the appalling lack of attention by the US health agencies to what was then, in 1987, an increase in improbable fatalities among previously healthy gay men in the United States. Its first inception unfolded in October 1987 on the National Mall in Washington DC as part of the March for Gay Rights; it included 1,920 Quilt panels. Now 25 years later, the Quilt encompasses more than 48,000 panels, representing 60 countries and commemorating more than 93,000 names. It is the largest living memorial of its kind in the world. This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment viewing of the textile Quilt. Balsamo will demonstrate three interactive experiences that are part of the AIDS Quilt Touch project. This talk is framed by a discussion of the role of the digital humanities in the creation of technological innovation.
Date Range: 2/5/2013
Location: Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
Primary URL: https://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S36/00/78A10/
Primary URL Description: Announcement of the talk


The Cultural Work of Interactive Memorials: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: The Cultural Work of Interactive Memorials: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment the viewing of the textile Quilt. I will demonstrate three digital experiences: 1) an open-source mobile web application called AIDS QUILT TOUCH; 2) a tangible tabletop interactive that enables viewers to SEARCH the database of Quilt images to find a specific image and to BROWSE the archive of Quilt panel images; and 3) a community sourcing application that engages people in analyzing and archiving information about the Quilt. This effort is framed by my recent transmedia book project called Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination At Work. In creating the Quilt Digital Experiences I was interested in exploring the cultural work of public interactives, to examine how they are implicated in practices of cultural reproduction—remembering, witnessing, archiving, and educating.
Date Range: 3/29/2013
Location: Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics Talk Series, at the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
Primary URL: http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/Speakers/SpeakerFiles/2013/2013_3_Balsamo_Ann.pdf
Primary URL Description: Poster of the talk
Secondary URL: http://irreplevisable.rssing.com/browser.php?indx=2159357&item=705
Secondary URL Description: Page of the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics


Designing Culture: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Designing Culture: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment the viewing of the textile Quilt. I will demonstrate three digital experiences: 1) an open-source mobile web application called AIDS QUILT TOUCH; 2) a tangible tabletop interactive that enables viewers to SEARCH the database of Quilt images to find a specific image and to BROWSE the archive of Quilt panel images; and 3) a community sourcing application that engages people in analyzing and archiving information about the Quilt. This effort is framed by my recent transmedia book project called Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination At Work. In creating the Quilt Digital Experiences I was interested in exploring the cultural work of public interactives, to examine how they are implicated in practices of cultural reproduction—remembering, witnessing, archiving, and educating.
Date Range: 4/26/2013
Location: Symposium Millennial Medicine: Knowledge Design for an Age of Digital Disruption, Rice University at Houston, TX, USA
Primary URL: http://www.medicalfutureslab.org/?page_id=16
Primary URL Description: Announcement of the Symposium


Designing Culture: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Designing Culture: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment the viewing of the textile Quilt. I will demonstrate three digital experiences: 1) an open-source mobile web application called AIDS QUILT TOUCH; 2) a tangible tabletop interactive that enables viewers to SEARCH the database of Quilt images to find a specific image and to BROWSE the archive of Quilt panel images; and 3) a community sourcing application that engages people in analyzing and archiving information about the Quilt. This effort is framed by my recent transmedia book project called Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination At Work. In creating the Quilt Digital Experiences I was interested in exploring the cultural work of public interactives, to examine how they are implicated in practices of cultural reproduction—remembering, witnessing, archiving, and educating.
Date Range: 4/18/2014
Location: Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Primary URL: http://disted.informatics.iupui.edu/4142_Lecture/Colloquia_Balsamo.php
Primary URL Description: Video of the talk


Heavy Data, Cultural Memories: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Heavy Data, Cultural Memories: Lessons from the AIDS Memorial Quilt Digital Experience Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment the viewing of the textile Quilt. I will demonstrate three digital experiences: 1) an open-source mobile web application called AIDS QUILT TOUCH; 2) a tangible tabletop interactive that enables viewers to SEARCH the database of Quilt images to find a specific image and to BROWSE the archive of Quilt panel images; and 3) a community sourcing application that engages people in analyzing and archiving information about the Quilt. This effort is framed by my recent transmedia book project called Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination At Work. In creating the Quilt Digital Experiences I was interested in exploring the cultural work of public interactives, to examine how they are implicated in practices of cultural reproduction—remembering, witnessing, archiving, and educating.
Date Range: 2/18/2014
Location: Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
Primary URL: http://mith.umd.edu/dialogues/dd-spring-2014-anne-balsamo/
Primary URL Description: Announcement of the talk. Includes video


The Archive as Boundary Object
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: The Archive as Boundary Object
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: "Epidemics, like wars, mark a generation for life." The AIDS Memorial Quilt was created 27 years ago as a work of community activism to protest the appalling lack of attention by the US health agencies to an increase in improbable fatalities among gay men in the United States. Its first inception unfolded in October 1987 on the National Mall in Washington DC as part of the March for Gay Rights; it included 1,920 Quilt panels. In 2014, the Quilt now encompasses more than 48,000 panels, representing 60 countries and commemorating more than 93,000 names. It is the largest living memorial of its kind in the world. The Quilt is also an "activist archive" of the late 20th century. The activities that gave rise to the Quilt in 1987 are part of the history of the campaign for gay and lesbian rights in the US. The Quilt literally stitches together a million memories, a million stories, a million lessons about the relationship between individual lives, public culture, and political activism. In its textile form, it is an unwieldy archive. If laid out in its entirety the Quilt would cover more than 1.3 million square feet. It weighs more than 34 tons.
Date Range: 12/10/2014 - 12/12/2014
Location: Umea University, Umea, Sweden
Primary URL: http://www.humlab.umu.se/en/research-development/events/archive/genres-of-scholarly-knowledge-production/goskp-program/
Primary URL Description: Program of Genres of Scholarly Knowledge Production


Big Quilt, Big Data: the AIDS Quilt Touch Project
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Big Quilt, Big Data: the AIDS Quilt Touch Project
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: The AIDS Memorial Quilt was created 25 years ago as a work of community activism to protest the appalling lack of attention by the US health agencies to what was then, in 1987, an increase in improbable fatalities among previously healthy gay men in the United States. Its first inception unfolded in October 1987 on the National Mall in Washington DC as part of the March for Gay Rights; it included 1,920 Quilt panels. Now 25 years later, the Quilt encompasses more than 48,000 panels, representing 60 countries and commemorating more than 93,000 names. It is the largest living memorial of its kind in the world. This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment viewing of the textile Quilt. Balsamo will demonstrate three interactive experiences that are part of the AIDS Quilt Touch project. This talk is framed by a discussion of the role of the digital humanities in the creation of technological innovation.
Date Range: 10/15/2015
Location: Center for Digital Humanities, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
Primary URL: https://sc.edu/about/centers/digital_humanities/future_knowledge_archive/balsamo.php
Primary URL Description: Page in the Center Website that announces the talk. It includes a video stream of the talk.


Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work in the Creation of Cultural Heritage
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work in the Creation of Cultural Heritage
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: This presentation discusses the creation of an interactive memorial that was designed to augment the viewing of the textile Quilt. I will demonstrate three digital experiences: 1) an open-source mobile web application called AIDS QUILT TOUCH; 2) a tangible tabletop interactive that enables viewers to SEARCH the database of Quilt images to find a specific image and to BROWSE the archive of Quilt panel images; and 3) a community sourcing application that engages people in analyzing and archiving information about the Quilt. This effort is framed by my recent transmedia book project called Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination At Work. In creating the Quilt Digital Experiences I was interested in exploring the cultural work of public interactives, to examine how they are implicated in practices of cultural reproduction—remembering, witnessing, archiving, and educating.
Date Range: 3/4/2015
Location: Katz Distinguished Lectures, Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
Primary URL: https://simpsoncenter.org/programs/lecture-series/katz-distinguished-lectures-humanitites/anne_balsamo
Primary URL Description: Announcement of the talk
Secondary URL: https://simpsoncenter.org/news/2015/03/anne-balsamo-digitizing-aids-quilt-cultural-amnesia
Secondary URL Description: Article on Dr. Balsamo’s work and talk. Include video of the talk


Digital Memorials and Media Art Activism: Designing Digital Experiences for the AIDS Memorial Quilt
Grant details: HK-50155-14
Title: Digital Memorials and Media Art Activism: Designing Digital Experiences for the AIDS Memorial Quilt
Author: Anne Balsamo
Abstract: The AIDS Memorial Quilt was created 27 years ago as a work of community activism to protest the appalling lack of attention by the US health agencies to an increase in improbable fatalities among gay men in the United States. Its first inception unfolded in October 1987 on the National Mall in Washington DC as part of the March for Gay Rights; it included 1,920 Quilt panels. In 2014, the Quilt now encompasses more than 48,000 panels, representing 60 countries and commemorating more than 93,000 names. It is the largest living memorial of its kind in the world. The Quilt is also an "activist archive" of the late 20th century. The activities that gave rise to the Quilt in 1987 are part of the history of the campaign for gay and lesbian rights in the US. The Quilt literally stitches together a million memories, a million stories, a million lessons about the relationship between individual lives, public culture, and political activism. In its textile form, it is an unwieldy archive. If laid out in its entirety the Quilt would cover more than 1.3 million square feet. It weighs more than 34 tons.
Date Range: 12/1/2014
Location: The New School, New York, NY, USA
Primary URL: http://events.newschool.edu/event/digital_memorials_and_media_art_activism_designing_digital_experiences_for_the_aids_memorial_quilt#.WJEc6RDozwV
Primary URL Description: Announcement of the talk
Secondary URL: https://livestream.com/TheNewSchool/digital-memorials-media-art-activism/videos/70085569
Secondary URL Description: Link for a live stream of the talk.


CH-CASE II Workshop
Grant details: HK-50161-14
Title: CH-CASE II Workshop
Author: Quinn Dombrowski
Author: Patrick Schmitz
Author: Laurie Pearce
Abstract: The 2nd international workshop, Collaborative Annotations in Shared Environments: Metadata, Tools, and Techniques in the Digital Humanities (DH-CASE II), which took place in Fort Collins, CO as part of the 2014 DocEng conference, was organized by Patrick Schmitz, Laurie Pearce, and Quinn Dombrowski.
Date Range: 09/16/2014
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Primary URL: http://live-berkeleyprosopographyservices.pantheon.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/DH-CASE_II_Collaborative_Annotations_on.pdf
Primary URL Description: PDF of preface to the Proceedings of the Workshop


BPS Matrix Workshop
Grant details: HK-50161-14
Title: BPS Matrix Workshop
Author: Laurie Pearce
Author: Patrick Schmitz
Abstract: The BPS Matrix Workshop, generously funded by the UC Berkeley Social Science Matrix, focused on the integration of Social Network Analysis (SNA) visualization tools into partner projects and the transformation of data sets (in csv format) into TEI for use in BPS.
Date Range: April 28-29, 2016
Location: UC Berkeley


UCB-LMU Workshop
Grant details: HK-50161-14
Title: UCB-LMU Workshop
Author: Niek Veldhuis
Author: Laurie Pearce
Author: Patrick Schmitz
Abstract: This workshop, which brought together researchers from Berkeley and LMU, centered around the potential for BPS to be used in Neo-Assyrian prosopography. This has set the stage for future collaborations.
Date Range: September 9-11, 2017
Location: UC Berkeley
Primary URL: http://live-berkeleyprosopographyservices.pantheon.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/2017UCB-LMU-Workshop.pptx
Primary URL Description: A PDF of slides of the presentation by Laurie Pearce.


The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for lexical trend discovery
Grant details: HK-50176-14
Title: The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for lexical trend discovery
Author: Sayan Bhattacharyya
Author: Harriett Green
Abstract: The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for discovering and plotting lexical trends: Scholarly research using the power of data and metadata. Bookworm is a tool for visualization and analysis. It is useful for plotting usage trends in collections of texts. The newly developed HathiTrust + Bookworm tool enables you to explore the texts from the HathiTrust Digital Library. The HathiTrust Digital Library consists of materials from the digitized holdings of some of the most important research libraries in the world, and currently consists of approximately twelve million physical volumes of text in digitized form. This workshop will teach attendees how to use the HathiTrust + Bookworm tool to discover word usage trends across English-language texts from Hathi Trust. The attendees will learn how to create custom subsets of texts from the HathiTrust collection, and how to plot word trends with the Bookworm tool
Date Range: 4/29/15
Location: University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Primary URL: http://illinois.edu/calendar/detail/4068?eventId=32632315&calMin=201504&cal=20150408&skinId=7198
Primary URL Description: Link to event entry.


The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for lexical trend discovery
Grant details: HK-50176-14
Title: The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for lexical trend discovery
Author: Sayan Bhattacharyya
Abstract: The HathiTrust+Bookworm tool for discovering and plotting lexical trends: Scholarly research using the power of data and metadata. Bookworm is a tool for visualization and analysis. It is useful for plotting usage trends in collections of texts. The newly developed HathiTrust + Bookworm tool enables you to explore the texts from the HathiTrust Digital Library. The HathiTrust Digital Library consists of materials from the digitized holdings of some of the most important research libraries in the world, and currently consists of approximately twelve million physical volumes of text in digitized form. This workshop will teach attendees how to use the HathiTrust + Bookworm tool to discover word usage trends across English-language texts from Hathi Trust. The attendees will learn how to create custom subsets of texts from the HathiTrust collection, and how to plot word trends with the Bookworm tool
Date Range: 4/30/15
Location: Virtual workshop


Text mining with the HathiTrust Research Center: An introduction to working with digitized text corpora and metadata
Grant details: HK-50176-14
Title: Text mining with the HathiTrust Research Center: An introduction to working with digitized text corpora and metadata
Author: Sayan Bhattacharyya
Abstract: The workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to the HTDL collection and its metadata, and to the tools and functionalities developed by the HTRC that leverage these resources. Through the concrete instances of the HTRC tools, the workshop will orient attendees about the new challenges and opportunities that the ability to carry out algorithmic text analysis at such a large scale presents to researchers. The workshop will cover the Secure Hathi Analytics Research Commons (SHARC), the HathiTrust+Bookworm (HT+BW) tool and the HTRC Extracted Features Dataset. Attendees will be shown how to build their own worksets (small, customized subcorpora from the HathiTrust Digital Library corpus) and how to conduct analyses on worksets. There will also be group discussion involving all attendees about the emerging questions that these novel developments are likely to inaugurate in their own fields and about how these developments can affirm or disrupt (or both affirm and disrupt simultaneously) established practices of inquiry.
Date Range: 5/30/15
Location: HASTAC 16, Michigan State University
Primary URL: http://www.hastac2015.org/schedule/
Primary URL Description: Event listing for workshop


The HathiTrust Research Center: Large-scale Computational Analysis with the World’s First Massive Digital Library
Grant details: HK-50176-14
Title: The HathiTrust Research Center: Large-scale Computational Analysis with the World’s First Massive Digital Library
Author: Sayan Bhattacharyya
Abstract: The HathiTrust (HT) is a research consortium and digital library consisting of more than 13 million volumes of digitized text, mostly from the world's foremost research libraries. A large part of this material is under copyright and hence not directly downloadable. The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) has started developing facilities for non-consumptive access to the text data by providing innovative means of analytical access (without allowing download-access) to the text data. The workshop is intended for students and researchers interested in textual analytics using the HTRC corpus. Sayan Bhattacharyya, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the HTRC, will showcase different approaches/mechanisms for non-consumptive analysis of the HT corpus, such as a portal, an HTRC Data Capsule, an Extracted Features (EF) dataset based on a subset of the corpus, and an HT+Bookworm tool for trend analysis on the corpus.
Date Range: 7/13/15
Location: LSA's Biennial Linguistic Institute, The University of Chicago
Primary URL: https://lsa2015.uchicago.edu/events/hathitrust-research-center-large-scale-computational-analysis-world-s-first-massive-digital
Primary URL Description: Event listing on website.


Introduction to the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC): Teaching and research using the power of data and metadata in large text corpora
Grant details: HK-50176-14
Title: Introduction to the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC): Teaching and research using the power of data and metadata in large text corpora
Author: Sayan Bhattacharyya
Author: Eleanor Dickson
Abstract: Introduction to using HTRC services and tools, including Bookworm, for the classroom.
Date Range: 7/28/15
Location: Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) 2015


TRANSNATIONAL CITIES: PAST INTO PRESENT
Grant details: HR-50517-10
Title: TRANSNATIONAL CITIES: PAST INTO PRESENT
Author: Nancy H. Kwak
Author: A. K. Sandoval-Strausz
Abstract: The purpose of this conference is to bring together scholars who are well situated to think through the practice and direction of transnational urban history and planning at an early point in their development. Drawing upon our own research, we will exchange ideas about methodology and theory; and in light of the way that other fields have been transformed by the transnational turn, we will consider how best to frame our own contributions.
Date Range: 03/28/2014-03/29/2014
Location: University of New Mexico
Primary URL: http://history.unm.edu/news-events/events/Transnational%20Cities%20Schedule.pdf
Primary URL Description: The program, from the UNM website.


Digital Humanities Research Institute
Grant details: HT-256968-17
Title: Digital Humanities Research Institute
Author: Lisa Rhody
Abstract: The Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) is a ten-day residential workshop held from June 11–20, 2018, hosted by Graduate Center Digital Initiatives and The Graduate Center, CUNY. Participants will develop core computational research skills through hands-on workshops, explore interdisciplinary digital humanities research and teaching with leading DH scholars, and begin developing versions of the DHRI for their own communities. Over the following academic year, each participant will have access to an online network of peers, as well as 20 hours of consultation from our experienced staff while they lead their own DHRI. Participants will return to New York in June 2019 to report on their experiences and contribute to a guide to leading DHRIs in a variety of institutional contexts.
Date Range: 9/2017-8/2019
Location: The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY
Primary URL: http://dhinstitutes.org/


Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute
Grant details: HT-261817-18
Title: Caribbean Studies Digital Humanities Institute
Author: Project Team
Abstract: In August 2018, the National Endowment for the Humanities announced that they awarded $212,247 for Migration, Mobility, and Sustainability: Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Advanced Institute. In partnership with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), we proposed this collaborative project to host a weeklong, in-person workshop and five additional monthly virtual workshops on collaborative Digital Humanities (DH) and Caribbean Studies. This grant proposal and project developed from our shared feminist technology practices, where we approach and utilize technology to best meet community needs. Feminist technology practices are transdisciplinary, recognize the importance of people in relation to technologies and technical practices, and are socio-technical, encompassing people, policies, communities, and technologies together. As such, this project begins by acknowledging distributed and diverse expertise in our communities, respecting diversity and difference, and affirming the power and value of our communities and networks, including both working collaboratively together as members of the investigator team as well as working in relation to our connected communities.
Date Range: 5/20-5/24/2019
Location: Gainesville, Florida
Primary URL: http://dloc.com/teach/schedule


Enter Textuality: Shifting Perspectives Through Editorial Studies
Grant details: HT-50092-14
Title: Enter Textuality: Shifting Perspectives Through Editorial Studies
Author: Erica Zimmer
Abstract: An annual One-Day Graduate Student Conference in Editorial Studies held at the Editorial Institute at Boston University. Visit website for the program of speakers.
Date Range: 4/30/2016
Location: Editorial Institute, Boston University, Boston, MA
Primary URL: http://www.bu.edu/editinst/programs/graduate-conference-in-editorial-studies/


Big Digs Go Digital
Grant details: HW-50003-09
Title: Big Digs Go Digital
Author: James Herbst
Author: Ortwin Dally
Author: Bruce Hartzler
Author: Rainer Komp
Author: Greg Crane
Abstract: Representatives of the German Archaeological Institute and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens convened in Athens and Corinth for four days (November 4-7) to discuss problems in information technology as they pertain to the so-called “Big Digs,” that is, excavations like Ancient Corinth, the Athenian Agora, Olympia, and the Kerameikos. The purpose of the gathering was to explore opportunities for collaboration between American and German archaeologists. This initial workshop was made possible through a generous grant from the DFG/NEH Bilateral Digital Humanities Program in reponse to a proposal: “The ‘Big Digs’ Go Digital: Opportunities and Challenges for Large-Scale, Multigenerational Excavation Projects in the Digital Age.” The 30 representatives from the two institutions included directors of the German and American schools in Athens, the General Secretary of the DAI in Berlin, and the head of ASCSA’s Committee on Information Technology. Greek colleagues, Metaxia Tsipopoulou, Director, National Archives of Monuments of Greece, and Despina Tsiafaki, Head of Cultural Heritage United, CETI, participated in the discussions. A second workshop will take place at the Annual Meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America in Anaheim, California (January 7, 2010)
Date Range: Nov. 4-7 2009; January 7, 2010
Location: Athens Greece; Anaheim, CA
Primary URL: http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/news/newsDetails/big-digs-go-digital-conference-explores-collaborations/
Secondary URL: http://bigdigs.org/tiki-index.php


Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group Spring 2019 Meeting
Grant details: HZ-234002-16
Title: Texas Regional SSAWW Study Group Spring 2019 Meeting
Abstract: Agenda: • 11:30 a.m.: Coffee & Sign-in, Avesta Restaurant ,2nd floor University Union (Rm. 248) • 12-1 p.m.: Luncheon, Avesta Restaurant • 1-1:15: Break, walk to Willis Library, 2nd floor • 1:15-4:45 p.m.: Discussion of text, Willis 250H (Angie Calcaterra & John Martin) • 4:45-5 p.m: Business Meeting, Willis 250H (Theresa Gaul & Desiree Henderson) • 5:30 p.m.: Dinner at Barley & Board, 100 W.Oak St., Denton, TX 76201
Date Range: February 23, 2019
Location: University of North Texas


"Migration and Digital Storytelling"
Grant details: LD-234222-16
Title: "Migration and Digital Storytelling"
Author: Erika Lee
Author: Saengmany Ratsabout
Author: Bryan Pekel
Abstract: This institute provides professional development opportunities for K-16 educators across Minnesota and has two goals. First, participants will learn about Minnesota's migration history in the context of major global migrations. Second, educators will develop the technical skills necessary to create a digital story and to instruct their students in digital storytelling. Beyond these, the Institute strives to give educators the skills necessary for them to help their students tell stories of migration and to achieve global competencies as defined by the US Department of Education.
Date Range: 06/13/2016 - 06/16/2016
Location: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Primary URL: http://http://igs.cla.umn.edu/outreach/profdev.html
Primary URL Description: University of Minnesota's Institute for Global Studies Professional Development Programs website that lists all institutes offered from affiliated departments and center.


"Empires and Their Aftermaths"
Grant details: ME-50005-12
Title: "Empires and Their Aftermaths"
Author: Shannon Bontrager
Abstract: Organizer, “Empires and Their Aftermaths” Pedagogical Workshop, Georgia Highlands College, 4 October 2013.
Date Range: October 2013


The Newspaper Archive Summit
Grant details: PJ-50045-09
Title: The Newspaper Archive Summit
Author: Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute
Abstract: Meeting of newspaper publishers, journalists, commercial vendors, and non-profit organizations seeking to understand the changing life-cycle of physical and born-digital newspapers.
Date Range: April 10-12, 2011
Location: University of Missouri, Columbia
Primary URL: http://www.rjionline.org/events/newspaper-archive-summit
Primary URL Description: Website includes agenda, biographies for presenters and panel members, and several recorded sessions.


Working with your Advisory Group
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Working with your Advisory Group
Author: JoAnne Deeken
Abstract: TNDP's PI, JoAnne Deeken, was invited to talk to other NDNP Project Directors about how to select and work with an Advisory Group.
Date Range: August 29, 2011
Location: NDNP Annual Meeting, Washington, DC


Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: An introduction and demonstration of Chronicling America and TNDP for Special Collections staff.
Date Range: March 2012
Location: Hodges Library, University of Tennessee


Collections2Classrooms
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Collections2Classrooms
Author: JoAnne Deeken
Abstract: Presentation about Chronicling America/TNDP. Part of a workshop encouraging teachers to use primary sources in the classroom.
Date Range: March 24, 2012
Location: Nashville Public Library


Technical Talks - Quality Review
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Technical Talks - Quality Review
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: TNDP Project Coordinator, Louisa Trott, was invited to co-present (with LC NDNP liaison, Tonijala Penn) the Quality Review segment of the Technical Talks session at the NDNP Annual meeting.
Date Range: September 2012
Location: NDNP Annual Meeting, Washington, DC


Rebel Rebel: History Reprinting Itself
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Rebel Rebel: History Reprinting Itself
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: Poster depicting the various reprints of the Chattanooga Daily Rebel.
Date Range: September 2012
Location: NDNP Annual Meeting, Washington, DC


Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: Teaching American History workshop. Presentation introducing Chronicling America and TNDP to teachers of American history.
Date Range: October 2012
Location: East Tennessee History Center, Knoxville


Contracts and Communication with Vendors
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Contracts and Communication with Vendors
Author: JoAnne Deeken
Abstract: TNDP's PI, JoAnne Deeken was invited to talk to NDNP awardees about contracts and good communication with vendors.
Date Range: September 2013
Location: NDNP Annual Meeting, Washington, DC


Good News about Old News: Civil War Newspaper Research in the Digital Age
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Good News about Old News: Civil War Newspaper Research in the Digital Age
Author: Chuck Sherrill
Abstract: Chuck Sherrill, Tennessee State Librarian and Archivist, gave a presentation at the Middle Tennessee Genealogical Annual Workshop, demonstrating how to use Civil War newspapers in Chronicling America for genealogical research. "Newspapers helped fire the imagination of Americans to get the Civil War started, and during the war reported extensively on events. In this session attendees will learn the value of newspaper research for home-front news, how to glean and evaluate genealogical information from news accounts and how to find and use new digital libraries of newspapers online."
Date Range: November 2013
Location: Brentwood Public Library, Brentwood, Tennessee


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at the Annual Conference of Connecticut Association of School Librarians and Connecticut Educators Computer Association, held at Mohegan Sun.
Date Range: 10/26/2015
Location: Mohegan Sun


Using HistoryPin to Promote Chronicling America to Genealogists
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Using HistoryPin to Promote Chronicling America to Genealogists
Author: Jane F. Cullinane
Abstract: Using a map to show that the two CT newspapers in Chronicling America covers local news from over 100 towns. Presented at the National Digital Newspaper Program 2015 Awardee Conference.
Date Range: 9/17/2015
Location: Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at the New Teacher's Conference sponsored by the Connecticut Education Association.
Date Range: 3/19/2016
Location: Mohegan Sun


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at 2015 CT History Day Kickoff event in Hartford. Shared table with other CT State Library activities. Staffed by Chris Gauvreau and State Library Outreach Librarian, Robert Kinney.
Date Range: 9/27/2014
Location: Old State House in Hartford, CT


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Gail Hurley
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at New England Library Association (NELA) Annual Conference in Boxborough, MA in order to encourage other New England states to be a part of the NDNP. Staffed by Gail Hurley and Chris Gauvreau.
Date Range: 10/19/2014-10/21/2014
Location: Holiday Inn Boxborough, MA


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at the Association for the Study of Connecticut History (ASCH) Fall Conference. Staffed by Chris Gauvreau.
Date Range: 11/1/2014
Location: Capital Community College, Hartford, CT


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at the Connecticut Library Association Annual Conference. Staffed by Jane Cullinane, Chris Gauvreau, and Gail Hurley. Photographs from 4/27/2015 on State Library Facebook page.
Date Range: 4/27/2015-4/28/2015
Location: Mystic Marriott in Groton, CT


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Author: Jane F. Cullinane
Abstract: Staffed exhibit table at the reception for the kickoff event for the State Library's Remembering World War I project. Staffed by Jane Cullinane.
Date Range: 5/27/2015
Location: Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT.


Using Chronicling America for Inquiry-Based Instruction
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Using Chronicling America for Inquiry-Based Instruction
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: Presented as part of a larger group on how CDNP newspaper content can be used as primary source material in inquiry exercises aligned with the new social studies framework. the workshop was sponsored by the CT League of History Organizations.
Date Range: 5/11/2016
Location: Van Block State Library facility in Hartford.


Using Chronicling America for Inquiry-Based Instruction
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Using Chronicling America for Inquiry-Based Instruction
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: A presentation at the Connecticut Historical Society for teachers on how to use newspaper content to create "Teach It" units. The presentation was followed by direct collaboration with teachers desiring to use newspaper content in inquiry-based instruction. This was one of three special sessions that ended the CT Council for the Social Studies Summer Institute.
Date Range: 6/23/2016
Location: CT Historical Society, Hartford
Primary URL: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecqik3qa20463125&llr=fprcgzlab


Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project
Abstract: CDNP had a table with a continuous slideshow for a Connecticut State Library event commemorating the entry of the U.S. into the First World War.
Date Range: 4/6/2017
Location: Museum of Connecticut History, Hartford


Critical Perspectives on the Practice of Digital Archaeology
Grant details: PR-234235-16
Title: Critical Perspectives on the Practice of Digital Archaeology
Author: Eric Kansa
Abstract: The creation, management, sharing, and preservation of digital data and media have gained great prominence in archaeological research, grant making, policy making, and software and systems development. Digital data has much promise. It can help us engage with wider communities, explore new research questions, and create and preserve a vastly enriched body of archaeological documentation. Digital data also has a certain glamor, gained in large part through its associations with the burgeoning tech industry. However, does our celebration of speed, efficiency, precision and innovation sometimes make technology a superficial distraction rather than a substantive means toward learning? How do we encourage more meaningful intellectual engagement with new media as they transform archaeology? This conference represents an opportunity to take stock and more thoughtfully consider how our embracement of digital technologies is transforming archaeological practice. (This was a one-day conference organized by Organized by Rowan Flad, Chair of the Standing Committee on Archaeology, Harvard University & Eric Kansa, Program Director, Open Context.)
Date Range: 02/03/2017
Location: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Primary URL: https://archaeology.harvard.edu/critical-perspectives-practice-digital-archaeology
Primary URL Description: Conference overview and list of speakers.
Secondary URL: https://web.archive.org/web/20180504220514/https://storify.com/skansa/critdigarch
Secondary URL Description: Archived Storify with tweets and videos of the presentations.


Data Publishing: Editorial and Curation Needs in Archaeology
Grant details: PR-234235-16
Title: Data Publishing: Editorial and Curation Needs in Archaeology
Abstract: Invited lecture presented by Eric Kansa at the conference “Digital Publication in Mediterranean Archaeology: Current Practice and Common Goals," hosted by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York.
Date Range: 10/20/17
Location: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
Primary URL: http://isaw.nyu.edu/library/blog/dig-pub-med-arch2017
Primary URL Description: ISAW blog


Open Context
Grant details: PR-234235-16
Title: Open Context
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: Invited lecture at the Linked Pasts III symposium at Stanford University, providing one of several active case studies and provocations to address the challenges of linking people, their works, and place in time. The setting provided a unique opportunity for scholars, technologists, librarians, and archivists to explore, build and shape linked data practices together.
Date Range: 12/4/17
Primary URL: https://shc.stanford.edu/events/linked-pasts-iii-new-voices-old-places
Primary URL Description: Stanford Humanities Center


Which future for digital heritage?
Grant details: PR-234235-16
Title: Which future for digital heritage?
Author: Eric Kansa
Abstract: Workshop/Panel participation (October 2018): Which future for digital heritage? (panelist Eric Kansa). Panel organized by Franco Niccolucci, PARTHENOS and ARIADNEplus Project Coordinator (DigitalHERITAGE 2018, San Francisco, CA)
Date Range: 10/28/18
Location: San Francisco, CA
Primary URL: http://www.digitalheritage2018.org/
Primary URL Description: Conference website


Best Practices for Digital Scholarship
Grant details: PR-234235-16
Title: Best Practices for Digital Scholarship
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Charles E. Jones
Abstract: Best Practices for Digital Scholarship is a 3-year session co-organized by Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context) and Charles E. Jones (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). The theme for Year 1 was "Networking and publishing: navigating social media, conventional publishing, and digital dissemination services" and featured presentations by five speakers, followed by a discussion. Year 2 (Nov. 2020) will focus on integrating excavation data and specialist data, with perspectives from eight panelists including project directors and a variety of specialists. Year 1 Presentations: Charles E. Jones (Pennsylvania State University), “Sharing Your Work: Library Ethics, Privacy, and Commercial Repositories” (15 min.) Erin Averett (Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska), Derek Counts (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), and Kevin Garstki (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), “Bridging Divides: Hybrid Approaches to Publishing 3D Data” (15 min.) Kevin McGeough (University of Lethbridge), Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context), Charles Jones (Pennsylvania State University), Andrea Berlin (Boston University), William Caraher (University of North Dakota), Eric Kansa (Open Context), “Digital Media Policies for ASOR Publications” (15 min.) Eric Kansa (Open Context) and Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context), “Expanding the Reach, Scope, and Significance of Archaeological Publication” (15 min.) Suzanne Pilaar Birch (University of Georgia), “Discussant” (15 min.)
Date Range: 11/15/19
Location: American Schools of Oriental Research conference, San Diego, CA


Multi-lingual Optical Character Recognition Seminar
Grant details: PR-263939-19
Title: Multi-lingual Optical Character Recognition Seminar
Author: Marek Rychlik
Author: Yan Han
Abstract: This seminar is devoted to current OCR research and development of "Worldly OCR" software. It is open to external speakers. We are set up for Zoom presentations. Volunteering to give a presentation is welcome.
Date Range: 2019,2020
Primary URL: http://alamos.math.arizona.edu/ocr


Notating Tune with Text: Greensleeves and St. George and the Dragon
Grant details: PW-234727-16
Title: Notating Tune with Text: Greensleeves and St. George and the Dragon
Author: Erik Bell
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Abstract: Part II: Notating Tune with Text: Greensleeves and St George and the Dragon Led by Patricia Fumerton and Erik Bell Professor Fumerton explored questions of tune and text notations, with EBBA music specialist Erik Bell. Patricia Fumerton is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, director of UCSB’s English Broadside Ballad Archive, http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu, and author of Unsettled: The Culture of Mobility and the Working Poor in Early Modern England (2006) and of Cultural Aesthetics: Renaissance Literature and the Practice of Social Ornament (1991). She has just completed another monograph, Moving Media, Tactical Publics: The English Broadside Ballad in Early Modern England. Erik Bell completed his BA in Music (Piano Emphasis) in 2006 at the University of Oregon is currently a PhD candidate in Music Theory at UCSB, researching chord-transformational theory within 19th and early 20th-century music. The other hat he wears is Music Specialist for the English Broadside Ballad Archive, where he leads the newly funded Minstrel project of recording transcriptions and himself recording to date over 500 ballads. He has also worked as a Teaching Assistant for both the Musicianship series and Music Fundamentals at UCSB, lecturing for Music Fundamentals during Summer 2013.
Date Range: 3/31/17
Location: University of Sussex Humanities Digital Lab, Brighton, UK
Primary URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/shl/events/eventsarchive


Human Computer Collaboration: Arch-V Image Matching and the Human-curated Woodcut Catalog
Grant details: PW-234727-16
Title: Human Computer Collaboration: Arch-V Image Matching and the Human-curated Woodcut Catalog
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Author: Carl Stahmer
Author: Megan Palmer
Abstract: Part I: Human Computer Collaboration: Arch-V Image Matching and the Human-curated Woodcut Catalog Led by Patricia Fumerton, Carl Stahmer, Megan Palmer Professor Fumerton addressed questions of digital archiving and collaboration, with EBBA associates Dr Megan E.Palmer, specialist in historical woodcut impressions, and Dr Carl Stahmer, Digital Humanities historical archive specialist.
Date Range: 3/31/17
Location: University of Sussex Humanities Digital Lab, Brighton, UK
Primary URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/shl/events/eventsarchive


The World(s) of Print
Grant details: PW-234727-16
Title: The World(s) of Print
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Abstract: Project Director Patricia Fumerton organized the colloquium and workshop "The World(s) of Print," bringing together professors and graduate students from UC Santa Barbara and Vanderbilt University, May 3-4, 2019.
Date Range: May 3-4, 2019
Location: Santa Barbara, California


"The Worlds of Print"
Grant details: PW-258977-18
Title: "The Worlds of Print"
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Author: Kevin Murphy
Author: Giorgina Paiella
Author: Carl Stahmer
Author: Mark Hosford
Author: Mona Frederick
Author: James Kearney
Author: Andrew Griffin
Author: Nicole Stark
Author: Katie Adkison
Author: José Cardenas Bunsen
Author: Rebecca Vandiver
Author: Harry Reese
Abstract: An interdisciplinary conference bringing together professors and graduate students from UC Santa Barbara and Vanderbilt University
Date Range: May 3-4, 2019
Location: UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
Primary URL: http://emc.english.ucsb.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/worlds-of-print-schedule.pdf
Primary URL Description: Conference schedule


DARE and American Dictionaries: A mini-conference celebrating the Dictionary of American Regional English
Grant details: PW-50551-10
Title: DARE and American Dictionaries: A mini-conference celebrating the Dictionary of American Regional English
Author: McKean, Erin
Author: Winchester, Simon
Author: Adams, Michael
Abstract: Winchester, Simon: "Fixing the Fugitive Tongue" Adams, Michael: "DARE, Literature, and Regional Identity" McKean, Erin: "A Wealth of Words"
Date Range: May 3, 2012
Location: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Pyle Center


Living English Broadside Ballads, 1550 - 1750: Song, Art, Dance, Culture
Grant details: PW-50983-12
Title: Living English Broadside Ballads, 1550 - 1750: Song, Art, Dance, Culture
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Author: Charlotte Becker
Author: Frances E. Dolan
Author: Eric Nebeker
Author: Adam Fox
Author: Mark Hailwood
Author: Michael Heaney
Author: Carl Stahmer
Author: Bruce Smith
Author: Angela McShane
Author: Lucie Skeaping
Author: Roger Clegg
Author: Megan Palmer-Browne
Author: Christopher Marsh
Abstract: N/A
Date Range: 4/4/2014 - 4/5/2014
Location: Huntington Library, San Marino, California
Primary URL: http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/content/Huntington-Brochure.pdf


Reconsidering Harald Szeemann
Grant details: PW-51045-12
Title: Reconsidering Harald Szeemann
Author: Getty Research Institute (GRI)
Abstract: This panel "Reconsidering Harald Szeemann" moderated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, guest scholar at the Getty Research Institute (GRI), artistic director of dOCUMENTA (13) (2012), and curator of the 14th Istanbul Biennial (2015), explored the work and legacy of Swiss curator Harald Szeemann (1933–2005), whose provocative and groundbreaking exhibitions have exerted a lasting influence on the field of contemporary art and exhibition-making. Much of Szeemann’s practice was centered around close collaborative relationships with more than 20,000 artists and a sweeping global vision of culture, that influenced the development of more than 200 exhibitions over a career that spanned nearly 50 years. Many projects, such as When Attitudes Become Form in 1969 and documenta 5 in 1972, were controversial and harshly criticized, but over time they have become landmark exhibitions of their era. The Harald Szeemann Archive and Library was acquired by the Getty Research Library in 2011, that now provides free public access to this immense resource of research materials chronicling Szeemann’s work and practice though meticulously preserved documents, photographs, and other items. Accelerated Szeemann archive processing and public access was made possible through this generous NEH-HCRR grant.
Date Range: 5/28/2015
Location: The Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall, Los Angeles, CA
Primary URL: http://www.getty.edu/research/exhibitions_events/events/reconsidering_szeemann.html
Primary URL Description: This URL links to a Getty Research Institute webpage, located on the Getty website, that documents the public panel event “Reconsidering Harald Szeemann.”


Digital Coptic 2 Symposium and Workshop
Grant details: PW-51672-14
Title: Digital Coptic 2 Symposium and Workshop
Abstract: Coptic SCRIPTORIUM hosted a second workshop and symposium on Digital Humanities and Coptic Studies. It took place March 12-13, 2015 at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. This event followed on the workshop in May 2013 at Humboldt University, Berlin. There were no registration fees to attend. Day 1 was a public symposium on Digital Humanities and Coptic Studies. Day 2 was a workshop on Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.
Date Range: March 2015
Location: Georgetown University
Primary URL: http://copticscriptorium.org/workshop2015/index.html


Re-ordering the Middle East, 1912-1948
Grant details: RA-228585-15
Title: Re-ordering the Middle East, 1912-1948
Author: Fredrik Meiton
Abstract: N/A
Date Range: November 13-14, 2018
Location: Harvard University, Centre for European Studies


The Great Palestinian Divergence
Grant details: RA-228585-15
Title: The Great Palestinian Divergence
Author: f
Abstract: N/A
Date Range: October 4-6, 2018
Location: Amherst, Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies


The Non-Electrification of Nablus
Grant details: RA-228585-15
Title: The Non-Electrification of Nablus
Author: Fredrik Meiton
Abstract: This paper centers on the Palestinian Arab town of Nablus and the controversies over electrification that took place there in the years around the 1948 war. The Zionist-run and operated Palestine Electric Corporation held a monopolistic concession for the electrification of Palestine. As a result, the Palestinian community came to vie electrification as the handmaiden of Zionist conquest. “If Rutenberg electricity lights the city of Nablus and Tulkarm,” one Nabulsi writer warned in 1932, referring to the general manager of the PEC, “one can say that Rutenberg and his works have conquered the land.” That electricity was only available through a Zionist company presented the Palestinian community with a dilemma. Besides the imperative to reject Zionism and British colonial rule, many Palestinians also aspired to “be modern," which to most included access to electrical power and light. As this paper will show, using previously unused sources from the Israel Electric Corp. Archives and elsewhere, the struggle over electrification in Nablus – within the town and between the town and the PEC – both reflected and remade the political fault lines of the Palestinian community in ways that would bear heavily on the Arab Revolt, the 1948 War, and life under occupation.
Date Range: March 8-10, 2018
Location: Brown University, New Directions in Palestine Studies
Primary URL: https://palestinianstudies.org/workshops/2018/people/fredrik-meiton


Contentious Concession: Electrification and the Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Grant details: RA-228585-15
Title: Contentious Concession: Electrification and the Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Author: Fredrik Meiton
Abstract: N/A
Date Range: August 4, 2016
Location: Institute for Palestine Studies, Ramallah, Palestine


The Non-Electrification of Nablus
Grant details: RA-228585-15
Title: The Non-Electrification of Nablus
Author: Fredrik Meiton
Abstract: N/A
Date Range: October 11-14, 2018
Location: Society for the History of Technology (SHOT)


The Byzantine Neighborhood: Urban Space and Political Action
Grant details: RA-228627-15
Title: The Byzantine Neighborhood: Urban Space and Political Action
Author: Fotini Kondyli
Abstract: not available
Date Range: 11/17/2017
Location: Dumbarton Oaks Research library and museum


Craft production in the Medieval and Post-Medieval Mediterranean
Grant details: RA-228627-15
Title: Craft production in the Medieval and Post-Medieval Mediterranean
Author: Fotini Kondyli
Abstract: not available
Date Range: 1/6/2019
Location: AIA Annual Conference 2019 in San Diego


Pottery Consumption and Political Change: Mitrou, East Lokris, and the Palaces of Boeotia circa 1300 to 1190 B.C. (for Mycenaean Seminar)
Grant details: RA-228627-15
Title: Pottery Consumption and Political Change: Mitrou, East Lokris, and the Palaces of Boeotia circa 1300 to 1190 B.C. (for Mycenaean Seminar)
Author: Aleydis Van de Moortel
Author: S. Vitale
Abstract: not available
Date Range: 10/25/2017
Location: University of Athens, Greece


“Commercial Pictures and the Arts and Technics of Visual Persuasion”
Grant details: RA-234950-16
Title: “Commercial Pictures and the Arts and Technics of Visual Persuasion”
Author: Jennifer Greenhill
Author: Vanessa Schwartz
Author: Alex Taylor
Author: Roger Horowitz
Abstract: The “Commercial Pictures and the Arts and Technics of Visual Persuasion” conference will convene an international group of scholars concerned with the power of pictures in the world of commerce. As pictures became a central feature of the advertising message in the second half of the nineteenth century, they migrated from the pages of newspapers and magazines, and the posters on the sides of buildings, to such technologies as electrical spectaculars, film, and later, television. At the heart of this diffusion was an effort to make the pictorial sales message migrate not only across media but also into the minds of consumers. This conference is part of a two-year initiative on commercial pictures and the art of visual persuasion organized by Jennifer Greenhill (Associate Professor of Art History, USC), Vanessa Schwartz (Professor of Art History and History and Director of the Visual Studies Research Institute, USC), and Alex Taylor (Assistant Professor and Academic Curator, University of Pittsburgh). Roger Horowitz, Director of Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society, will join the program committee of this conference.
Date Range: November 2019
Location: Hagley Library, WIlmington Delaware
Primary URL: https://www.hagley.org/research/conferences/2019-fall-conference


“The Frail Bonds of Liberalism: Employee Pensions and Schools Bonds in New York State, 1955-1965”
Grant details: RA-264481-19
Title: “The Frail Bonds of Liberalism: Employee Pensions and Schools Bonds in New York State, 1955-1965”
Author: Michael R. Glass
Author: Sean Vanatta
Abstract: “The Frail Bonds of Liberalism: Employee Pensions and Schools Bonds in New York State, 1955-1965,” with Michael R. Glass, Columbia University Seminar in Economic History, Columbia University, New York, NY (2019)
Date Range: Fall 2019
Location: New York City


“The Banker's Thumb: A History of US Banking Supervision from the Civil War to Dodd-Frank”
Grant details: RA-264481-19
Title: “The Banker's Thumb: A History of US Banking Supervision from the Civil War to Dodd-Frank”
Author: Peter Conti-Brown
Author: Sean Vanatta
Abstract: “The Banker's Thumb: A History of US Banking Supervision from the Civil War to Dodd-Frank,” with Peter Conti-Brown, Penn Economic History Forum, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (2019).
Date Range: fall 2019
Location: Philadelphia PA


Ottoman Timariot Cavalry in its Seventeenth-Century Twilight: A Resilient or “Zombie” Institution?
Grant details: RA-50003-03
Title: Ottoman Timariot Cavalry in its Seventeenth-Century Twilight: A Resilient or “Zombie” Institution?
Author: Victor Ostapchuk
Abstract: It has long been received wisdom that the Ottoman institution of the timar (fief / benefice / prebend) - which gave a virtual caste of cavalry or other servants of the state the right to tax peasant agriculture in exchange for military or other service - was a linchpin of that state’s organization. Moreover, the timar is widely considered as crucial for the successful workings of the empire during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as, for example, the kapikuli (“slave of the Porte”) military-administrative institution. The argument continues that the timar institution essentially became defunct by the seventeenth century, thanks to the adoption of viable gunpowder weaponry, inflationary pressures in Ottoman currency, and corruption. This seminar will offer a fresh look at these commonplaces in light of the problem of the survival of mountains of documents and defters—today mostly unseen or ignored—that suggest an institution that did not lose its vigour in the post-classical age and will consider the question, “Who are the ‘zombies,‘ Ottoman timariots or Ottomanist historians?”
Date Range: 02/15/2018
Location: University of Toronto Seminar in Ottoman and Turkish Studies
Primary URL: https://humanities.utoronto.ca/event_details/id=3485
Primary URL Description: Event announcement


New Discoveries in Old Dig Notebooks
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: New Discoveries in Old Dig Notebooks
Author: Nancy Klein
Abstract: Radcliffe Advanced Seminar
Date Range: 23-24 March 2007
Location: Radcliffe Center for Advanced Study, Cambridge


Hydraulic Euergetism: American Archaeology and Waterworks in Early 20th-century Greece,” for “Philhellenism, Philanthropy, or Political Convenience? American Archaeology in Greece
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: Hydraulic Euergetism: American Archaeology and Waterworks in Early 20th-century Greece,” for “Philhellenism, Philanthropy, or Political Convenience? American Archaeology in Greece
Author: Betsey A. Robinson
Abstract: A workshop organized by Jack Davis and Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan
Date Range: 5/28/10
Location: ASCSA, Athens, Greece


New Discoveries from Old Excavations
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: New Discoveries from Old Excavations
Author: Betsey A. Robinson
Abstract: Organizer and Speaker. Participants: Michael Boyd, Nancy Klein, Kostis Kourelis, Astrid Lindenlauf, Jutta Stroszeck, Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst.
Date Range: 23-24 March, 2007
Location: Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study


Space, Place, and Lived Experience in Antiquity
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: Space, Place, and Lived Experience in Antiquity
Author: Betsey A. Robinson
Abstract: Invited response to Jorunn Økland, Women in Their Place: Paul and the Corinthian Discourse of Gender and Sanctuary Space (T & T Clark, 2004), panel on Space, Place, and Lived Experience in Antiquity, Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting
Date Range: 11/18/06-11/21/06
Location: Washington, D.C.
Primary URL: http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Congresses_Abstracts.aspx?MeetingId=5


New Discoveries in Old Dig Notebooks
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: New Discoveries in Old Dig Notebooks
Author: Betsey A. Robinson
Abstract: Organizer and speaker, Radcliffe Advanced Seminar. Participants will include I. Tzonou-Herbst, N. Klein, K. Kourelis, and B.Millis from the ASCSA, as well as representatives of the German Archaeological Institute and British School of Archaeology
Date Range: 23-24 March 2007
Location: Radcliffe Center for Advanced Study, Cambridge


The Olympic Altis in 476
Grant details: RA-50033-05
Title: The Olympic Altis in 476
Author: Dr. Judith Barringer
Abstract: Research seminar
Date Range: 3/1/09-3/5/09
Location: University of Manchester


Stormy, Husky, Brawling: Chicago Poetry 100 Years After Sandburg’s Chicago Poems
Grant details: RA-50050-07
Title: Stormy, Husky, Brawling: Chicago Poetry 100 Years After Sandburg’s Chicago Poems
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: In March, 1914, Poetry magazine published Carl Sandburg’s controversial Chicago Poems, including the title ode to Chicago in which he famously coins it “City of the Big Shoulders.”To mark the occasion, from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 12, the Newberry will host an event that, if not brawling, promises to be rollicking, with a custom-made cake from Swedish Bakery and free beer from Haymarket Pub & Brewery, and readings, musical performances, and talks by—and discussions with—the following: Marc Smith, Robert Polito, Alison Cuddy, Erica Bernheim, Marten Stromberg, Kari Lydersen, and Bill Savage. “Stormy, Husky, Brawling” is emceed by Liesl Olson, Director of the Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry. The event was organized by Olson with the help of literary historian Paul Durica, founder of the interactive public history programs called “Pocket Guide to Hell.”
Date Range: March 12, 2014
Location: The Newberry Library


White City, Black Metropolis
Grant details: RA-50050-07
Title: White City, Black Metropolis
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: This paper begins with a look at the relationship between Gwendolyn Brooks and Richard Wright within the larger context of the Chicago Black Renaissance. Drawing upon new and extensive archival research, the paper maps out what was distinctive about Chicago’s literary culture at this time-especially in comparison to Harlem. It tells a story of interracial collaborations supported by the Works Progress Administration, and explores the question of how black writers conceived of an audience for their writing, when they were dependent upon white publishers. Ultimately the paper puts forth two claims: that the art and literature of Bronzeville balanced the aims of social realism with the experimental forms of literary modernism; and that the Chicago Black Renaissance was a movement with its own distinctive energy even as it was informed by a set of aesthetic concerns characteristic to Chicago more broadly. Writers and artists discussed in the paper include: Nelson Algren, Arna Bontemps, Gwendolyn Brooks, Horace Cayton, Jack Conroy, Eldzier Cortor, Ralph Ellison, Vivian Harsh, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Wayne Miller, Inez Stark, Gertrude Stein, Era Bell Thompson, Margaret Walker, Richard Wright.
Date Range: April 23, 2015
Location: The Newberry Library


Interdisciplinary Modernist Studies and the Cultural Event
Grant details: RA-50050-07
Title: Interdisciplinary Modernist Studies and the Cultural Event
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: This seminar examines the challenges and rewards of working across the borders separating fields such as literary criticism, art history, performance studies, and the natural and social sciences. Does the lauded interdisciplinarity of modernist studies offer original insights or risk “dilettantism"? What are the best methodologies for truly interdisciplinary projects? Invited Participants: Christopher Reed, English and Visual Culture, Penn State; Liesl Olson, American History and Culture, Newberry Library.
Date Range: November 6-9, 2014
Location: Modernist Studies Association Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Primary URL: https://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/msa16/index.html
Primary URL Description: Conference website


Regional Variation in Aegean Subsistence Systems
Grant details: RA-50055-07
Title: Regional Variation in Aegean Subsistence Systems
Author: Professor Harriet Blitzer
Abstract: Workshop for ASCSA Regular Students organized by Professor Margaret Miles.
Date Range: 3/4/09
Location: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece


The Renaissance Returns the Favor: The Influence of the Court of Pesaro in the Morea
Grant details: RA-50055-07
Title: The Renaissance Returns the Favor: The Influence of the Court of Pesaro in the Morea
Author: Dr. Diana Wright
Abstract: Renaissance Society of America
Date Range: 3/24/11-3/26/11
Location: Montreal, Quebec


Turkey in Theory
Grant details: RA-50078-09
Title: Turkey in Theory
Author: Brian Silverstein
Abstract: The conference, "Turkey in Theory," offered a interdisciplinary examination of aspects of the environment, history, politics, contemporary culture, religion and society. It aimed to explore and advance collaborations of mutual influence among humanities, interpretive social science disciplines, and literary and artistic worlds. Scholars and graduate student participants identified and elaborated on emergent themes in scholarship related to Turkey and the Ottoman Empire, with a set of conversations and debates about what is on and over the horizon in Turkey- and Ottoman-related work.
Date Range: April 2-3, 2015
Location: Arizona Center for Turkish Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson
Primary URL: http://www.confluencecenter.arizona.edu/faculty-grants
Primary URL Description: University of Arizona Confluencecenter grant announcement with link to program schedule.


Inventories as Political Acts: Shifts in recordkeeping practices at the end of the Middle Ages
Grant details: RA-50079-09
Title: Inventories as Political Acts: Shifts in recordkeeping practices at the end of the Middle Ages
Author: Randolph Head
Abstract: Abstract not available.
Date Range: 6/11/2013
Location: Birkbeck College, University of London


Hidden from History: The Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Hidden from History: The Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Rabbinic court records provide rich sources for the study of early modern European Jewish life. The authority to adjudicate civil disputes ranked among the most highly valued of all privileges extended to Jews in the course of their history. This conference explores French and German rabbinic courts of the late 1700s, just before the French Revolution, and challenges our understanding of the beginnings of Jewish modernity. This program is part of a series of events about the early modern community of Metz, France in honor of the publication of Protocols of Justice: The Pinkas of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789, introduction and editing by Jay Berkovitz (Brill Press, 2013). An accompanying exhibition, Circles of Justice, will open in October. The Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court is a rare and little-known volume from the collections of the YIVO Institute Archives.
Date Range: 10/06/2013
Location: Center for Jewish History


The Pinkas Beit ha-Din in Relation to Other Types of Pinkasim: An Integrated Reading
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: The Pinkas Beit ha-Din in Relation to Other Types of Pinkasim: An Integrated Reading
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Abstract not available.
Date Range: 07/2014
Location: Jerusalem


Inside the Metz Beit Din: Law and Historical Narrative in the Eighteenth Century
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Inside the Metz Beit Din: Law and Historical Narrative in the Eighteenth Century
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Abstract not available
Date Range: 11/2012
Location: Modern Jewish Studies Colloquium, Yale University


On the Use of Pinkasim in Writing Jewish History
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: On the Use of Pinkasim in Writing Jewish History
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Abstract not available.
Date Range: 07/2012
Location: Fourth Summer Academy of the Research Cluster "The Jewish Holy Roman Empire," Jerusalem.


The Pinkasim of Metz and Frankfurt (Advanced Paleography)
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: The Pinkasim of Metz and Frankfurt (Advanced Paleography)
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Abstract not available.
Date Range: 07/2012
Location: Jerusalem


Finding Common Ground: The Metz Beit Din and the French Judicial System
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Finding Common Ground: The Metz Beit Din and the French Judicial System
Author: Jay Berkovitz
Abstract: Abstract not available.
Date Range: 02/2012
Location: Early Modern Workshop, Brown University


Parnassim, Poseqim and Dayyanim: Competing Perspectives on Law and Legal Decision- Making in Early Modern Ashkenaz
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Parnassim, Poseqim and Dayyanim: Competing Perspectives on Law and Legal Decision- Making in Early Modern Ashkenaz
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Parnassim, Poseqim and Dayyanim: Competing Perspectives on Law and Legal Decision- Making in Early Modern Ashkenaz
Date Range: May 1, 2017
Location: Legal History Forum, Hebrew University Law Faculty


Advanced Paleography: Pinkassim
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Advanced Paleography: Pinkassim
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Seventh Summer Academy of the Research Cluster “The Jewish Holy Roman Empire.” Rauischholzhausen, Germany
Date Range: August 2015
Location: Seventh Summer Academy of the Research Cluster “The Jewish Holy Roman Empire.” Rauischholzhausen


Autonomy and Integration: Jewish Law and Legal Pluralism in Eighteenth-Century Metz
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Autonomy and Integration: Jewish Law and Legal Pluralism in Eighteenth-Century Metz
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law
Date Range: June 2015
Location: Tel Aviv University, Israel


From the Archives: Transforming Scholarship into Public History. A Conversation for Scholars, Curators and Students
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: From the Archives: Transforming Scholarship into Public History. A Conversation for Scholars, Curators and Students
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Author: Jacob Wisse
Author: Gabriel Goldstein
Author: Louis Kaplan
Author: Melissa Schiff
Author: Sharon Mintz
Author: Annie Polland
Author: Judith Siegel
Abstract: How do historians, curators and artists share the content and methodologies of historical research with the public? In what ways are material and visual culture evidence essential to informing public and scholarly expectations of the past? Do new technologies offer opportunities for greater public and academic interaction and engagement? What are the distinct strengths and challenges of exploring Jewish themes in public history? The Center for Jewish History and Yeshiva University Museum present a conversation examining the processes of research and conceptualization essential to the creation of academic studies, museum exhibitions and public programs.
Date Range: 01/29/2014
Location: Center for Jewish History, New York, NY


Three presentations on the Pinkas of the Metz Bet Din at the "Summer School in the Study of Ashkenazic Pinkassim"
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Three presentations on the Pinkas of the Metz Bet Din at the "Summer School in the Study of Ashkenazic Pinkassim"
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: In conjunction with the Simon Dubnow Institute and the Program in Judaic Studies at Brown University
Date Range: July 2016
Location: Brown University, Providence, RI
Primary URL: http://www.dubnow.de/1/events/summer-schools/


Interpretive Methods of Early Modern Ashkenazic Poseqim: Legal Decision-Making in Historical Perspective
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Interpretive Methods of Early Modern Ashkenazic Poseqim: Legal Decision-Making in Historical Perspective
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Jewish Law Association and Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University
Date Range: July 2016
Location: Jewish Law Association and Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University


Inheritance, Women, and Guardianship in Eighteenth-Century Metz: Custom and Law in Historical Perspective
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Inheritance, Women, and Guardianship in Eighteenth-Century Metz: Custom and Law in Historical Perspective
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Inheritance, Women, and Guardianship in Eighteenth-Century Metz: Custom and Law in Historical Perspective
Date Range: April 1, 2017
Location: Ashkenaz Forum, Hebrew University


Kill or be Killed? Realities and Representations of Violence in Seventeenth Century Ukraine
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Kill or be Killed? Realities and Representations of Violence in Seventeenth Century Ukraine
Author: Adam Teller
Abstract: Abstract not available
Date Range: 2013
Location: University of Maryland


From Amsterdam to Istanbul: The Polish-Jewish Refugee Crisis, 1648-1683
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: From Amsterdam to Istanbul: The Polish-Jewish Refugee Crisis, 1648-1683
Author: Adam Teller
Abstract: Abstract not available
Date Range: 11/14/2014
Location: The Davis Center, Princeton University
Primary URL: http://www.princeton.edu/history/events_archive/viewevent.xml?id=897
Primary URL Description: Davis Center website


Recourse to Gentile Courts and Dina de Malkhuta Dina
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: Recourse to Gentile Courts and Dina de Malkhuta Dina
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Seminaire rabbinique
Date Range: November 2015
Location: Paris, France


At the Intersection of Jewish Law and French Law: Traversing Social and Cultural Boundaries in Eighteenth-Century France
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: At the Intersection of Jewish Law and French Law: Traversing Social and Cultural Boundaries in Eighteenth-Century France
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Institute for Jewish Studies, University of Antwerp
Date Range: November 2015
Location: Institute for Jewish Studies, University of Antwerp, Belgium


A l'intersection du droit et de l'histoire: Le tribunal rabbinique de Metz avant la Révolution
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: A l'intersection du droit et de l'histoire: Le tribunal rabbinique de Metz avant la Révolution
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: La Société des études juives, Paris
Date Range: November 2015
Location: La Société des études juives, Paris, France


The Jurisdiction of the Rabbinical Court of Metz between French and Jewish Law
Grant details: RA-50090-10
Title: The Jurisdiction of the Rabbinical Court of Metz between French and Jewish Law
Author: Jay R. Berkovitz
Abstract: Seventh Summer Academy of the Research Cluster “The Jewish Holy Roman Empire.” Fulda
Date Range: August 2015
Location: Seventh Summer Academy of the Research Cluster “The Jewish Holy Roman Empire.” Fulda


Amy Allocco organizes conference "To Take Place: Culture, Religion, and Home-making in and beyond South Asia" at the University of Madras
Grant details: RA-50126-14
Title: Amy Allocco organizes conference "To Take Place: Culture, Religion, and Home-making in and beyond South Asia" at the University of Madras
Author: Amy Allocco
Abstract: The conference, held on July 28-29, 2016, was organized by Amy Allocco, associate professor of Religious Studies at Elon University and James Ponniah, assistant professor in the Department of Christian Studies at University of Madras. The conference attracted more than 50 attendees from the South Indian city and featured 16 presenters from throughout India and five additional countries. Speakers addressed the means and practices by which migrants, displaced persons and various other subcommunities in South Asia establish physical, conceptual and emotional spaces that put them at home or give rise to conflict with other groups.
Date Range: July 28-29, 2016
Location: Chennai, India
Primary URL: https://www.elon.edu/e-net/Article/135203


"The Astonishment of Experience: Psychology as a Citizen Science"
Grant details: RA-50142-14
Title: "The Astonishment of Experience: Psychology as a Citizen Science"
Author: Alicia Puglionesi
Abstract: Though the origins of scientific psychology in the U.S. are usually traced to the Harvard psychological laboratory established by William James in 1875, experimentation with mental phenomena had a long history as a public practice, a citizen science that pursued what James called “wild facts” embedded in everyday experience. This science, termed “psychical research”, encompassed studies of telepathy, clairvoyance, mediumship, and the emerging notion of a “subliminal” or unconscious self. The Astonishment of Experience shows how field sciences like meteorology and astronomy became models for psychical research, which in turn shaped the professional formation of psychology and its maligned double, parapsychology, in the early twentieth century. Spanning laboratories and asylums, cushioned parlors and remote weather stations, this project presents an expansive vision of how the mind sciences became a site of curiosity, hope, and danger for turn-of-the-century Americans living through unprecedented transformations of subjectivity.
Date Range: 09/15/2017
Location: Stanford University
Primary URL: https://anthropology.stanford.edu/events/cultures-minds-and-medicines/astonishment-experience-psychology-citizen-science
Primary URL Description: Stanford Department of Anthropology web page


Building Ancient Rome, Bit by Bit
Grant details: RF-50008-09
Title: Building Ancient Rome, Bit by Bit
Author: Diane Favro
Abstract: A historiographical analysis of digital projects on ancient Rome
Date Range: 7/28/2011
Location: Broadening the Digital Humanities, NEH Summer Institute, University of Southern California


Babylonian and Assyrian Text Commentaries: History, Typology, Comparative Perspectives
Grant details: RQ-230397-15
Title: Babylonian and Assyrian Text Commentaries: History, Typology, Comparative Perspectives
Author: Eckart Frahm
Abstract: Introduction to Babylonian and Assyrian text commentaries to an audience of Judaic Studies scholars.
Date Range: February 22, 2016
Location: The Jewish Theological Seminary, New York City


Cuneiform Commentaries on Medicine and Astrology in their Institutional, Geographical, and Diachronic Contexts
Grant details: RQ-230397-15
Title: Cuneiform Commentaries on Medicine and Astrology in their Institutional, Geographical, and Diachronic Contexts
Author: Eckart Frahm
Abstract: Socio-cultural context of medical and astrological commentaries from Babylonia and Assyria.
Date Range: 08/25/2016
Location: Berlin, Max-Planck Institute for the History of Science


Revision, Relocation, and Reinterpretation: Remarks on the Ritual Dynamics of the Babylonian Akitu Festival in the Seventh Century BCE
Grant details: RQ-230397-15
Title: Revision, Relocation, and Reinterpretation: Remarks on the Ritual Dynamics of the Babylonian Akitu Festival in the Seventh Century BCE
Author: Eckart Frahm
Abstract: Analysis of adaptations and reinterpretations of the cultic acts performed and the texts recited during the Babylonian Akitu festival. Lecture at the interdisciplinary conference “Ritual Landscapes and Performance.”
Date Range: 09/24/2016
Location: New Haven, Yale University


Workshop: "Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies"; presentation title: "“Jonathan Edwards and Native American Sources”
Grant details: RQ-230464-15
Title: Workshop: "Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies"; presentation title: "“Jonathan Edwards and Native American Sources”
Author: Kenneth P. Minkema
Abstract: After a review of some of the online initiatives of the Jonathan Edwards Center that may present resources for digital Native American and Indigenous Studies, this presentation reviews several areas in Edwards' corpus with potential for Native American Studies, including correspondence, sermons, petitions, and miscellaneous documents.
Date Range: 07/29/2015
Location: Yale University, New Haven, Conn.


Digital Shakespeare: Audiences and Scholars.
Grant details: RQ-230510-15
Title: Digital Shakespeare: Audiences and Scholars.
Author: Penelope Woods
Author: Suzanne Westfall
Author: Siobhan Keenan
Author: Erin Sullivan
Abstract: The digital age has offered new opportunities and challenges for creators and performers of Shakespeare and has recalibrated the position and autonomy of audiences in performance. The twenty-first century technological explosion has also increased the availability of theatrical records and commentaries, encouraging us to contemplate how pedagogy is changing, and how online resources such as Somerset and MacLean’s pioneering REED Patrons and Performances database may be used by wider communities to reflect on the early Shakespearean stage.
Date Range: 16 August 2016
Location: London, UK
Primary URL: http://www.wsc2016.info/sessions/digital-shakespeare-audiences-and-scholars/
Primary URL Description: Webpage describing this seminar at the 2016 World Shakespeare Congress.


James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project
Grant details: RQ-249881-16
Title: James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project
Author: James K. Polk Project
Abstract: In 2019, after sixty-one years of work, the James K. Polk Project will complete the fourteenth and final volume of the “Correspondence of James K. Polk.” Transcribed and annotated letters from Polk’s entire life and presidency will be accessible to scholars, teachers, students, and all Americans. On April 12–13 we celebrated this accomplishment with “James K. Polk and His Time: A Conference Finale to the Polk Project.” The event was hosted by the University of Tennessee History Department and held at the East Tennessee Historical Society, in Knoxville. Over eighty academic scholars, public historians, and community members gathered to take stock of what we now know about Polk and to assess the project’s contributions to historical study. Sessions included a keynote address by Amy S. Greenberg, a roundtable on Polk’s impact, a screening of Brian Rose’s Polk documentary, and presentations about Polk house museums. C-SPAN 3 recorded several sessions for a later national broadcast and archiving online.
Date Range: April 12–13, 2019
Location: East Tennessee Historical Society, Knoxville, TN
Primary URL: https://polkproject.utk.edu/conference/
Primary URL Description: This section of the Polk Project's website includes the program and other information about the conference.
Secondary URL: https://www.c-span.org/
Secondary URL Description: This website includes video of three sessions of the conference. They can be found by searching the archive of videos for "Polk."


Ancient Objects and New Media: Vetusta Monumenta and the Remediation of Antiquity
Grant details: RQ-255691-17
Title: Ancient Objects and New Media: Vetusta Monumenta and the Remediation of Antiquity
Author: Noah Heringman
Abstract: This one-day symposium at the Society of Antiquaries of London, organized by the Vetusta Monumenta editorial team, featured ten distinguished speakers from around Great Britain.
Date Range: 6/24/2019
Location: Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London
Primary URL: https://us6.campaign-archive.com/?u=5557bc147d34993782f185bde&id=c27243df1b#mctoc4
Primary URL Description: This link goes to an announcement concerning the event on the SAL web site.
Secondary URL: http://sal.org.uk
Secondary URL Description: This is the main web site of the Society of Antiquaries.


The Role of Place in Thomas Edison's Inventive Career
Grant details: RQ-50364-09
Title: The Role of Place in Thomas Edison's Inventive Career
Author: Paul Israel
Abstract: Dr. Israel discusses Edison’s early career and the range of places in which he worked. These early experiences directly influenced Edison’s most important work at the Menlo Park and West Orange, New Jersey laboratories which drew on and embodied aspects of earlier places in Edison's career.
Date Range: 11/7/2009
Location: National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC


“Latin Poets and the Battle of Lepanto,”
Grant details: RQ-50431-10
Title: “Latin Poets and the Battle of Lepanto,”
Author: Wright, Elizabeth R.
Author: Spence, Sarah
Author: Lemons, Andrew
Abstract: A joint presentation on the entire research project for a mixed public that included undergraduates, graduates, faculty colleagues and interested members of the wider Athens Georgia community.
Date Range: March 23, 2012


Reflections on Emerging Modernity: Notes from an Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Grant details: RQ-50431-10
Title: Reflections on Emerging Modernity: Notes from an Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Author: Spence, Sarah
Author: Wright, Elizabeth R.
Abstract: Joint presentation to the University of Georgia, Department of Romance Languages, colloquium. We conducted it in a workshop fashion, sharing texts and interpretations, while inviting the public to contribute.
Date Range: October 10, 2010


Indigenous Archives in the Digital Age
Grant details: RQ-50470-10
Title: Indigenous Archives in the Digital Age
Author: Ivy Schweitzer
Author: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon
Abstract: A Workshop and Symposium co-sponsored by the Society of Early Americanists and Dartmouth College to launch the Occom Circle project
Date Range: 9/9-11/16
Location: Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
Primary URL: http://sites.dartmouth.edu/indigenousarchives-conference/
Primary URL Description: The website for this symposium contains the schedule, registration for the conference and information about lodging and travel to the area.


Owaneco's Pipe: A Prolegomenon to the Native Atlantic World
Grant details: RQ-50471-10
Title: Owaneco's Pipe: A Prolegomenon to the Native Atlantic World
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: This paper speaks to what some in American Indian Studies have suggested is the Native Atlantic world, or the Atlantic world through Native eyes. It demonstrates how during the Early Modern Period, American Indians were exploring and redefining their status as “subjects of the crown” in an increasingly violent colonial world, eventually leveraging that status against the colonies’ reckless land policies. Such a perspective has resulted in some interesting questions. For example, if the Indians’ rights as subjects depended on the crown’s prerogative, what happened to those rights when the king was removed? How did the Indians understand the Restoration? How were American colonial Indian policies responding to the changes before, during, and after the English civil war? The answer to these questions reveals a fairly unexplored dynamic between government officials at Whitehall, their American colonial counterparts, and Native tribal leaders in New England. I will address the foundations of that dynamic from its beginnings at the start of the 17th century through crucial subsequent developments which survived two wars – the English civil war and the New England Native conflict commonly known as King Philip’s War (1675-76) – culminating in 1704, when the Mohegans brought their complaint against the Colony of Connecticut to Queen Anne’s Privy Council. Thus, the paper explores early American Indian policies not only at Whitehall but in colonial and tribal power centers in New England, sometimes with surprising observations.
Date Range: 10/25/2012
Location: Early Modern Britain Seminar, Center for Early Modern Studies, Oxford University
Primary URL: http://www.cems-oxford.org/current-events


New Jersey: State of Invention
Grant details: RQ-50570-11
Title: New Jersey: State of Invention
Abstract: The "New Jersey: State of Invention" conference, to run from 1:00 - 5:30 p.m. and conclude with a reception, will feature noted speakers and a variety of perspectives on the continued inventiveness in the Garden State. The featured speaker will be Princess Elettra Marconi Giovannelli, daughter of the famed 20th century Italian scientist and radio inventor Guglielmo Marconi. Other scheduled speakers at the "State of Invention" conference include Paul Israel, director of the Edison Papers Project; Mary Chute, New Jersey State Librarian; Sheldon Hochheiser, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers historian; Brian D. Levine, Mayor of Franklin Park, NJ; Marianne Gaunt, Rutgers' Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian; and others. The conference is free and open to the public. It is cosponsored by the Rutgers University Libraries, the Edison Papers Project, and the Classics Department of the School of Arts and Sciences.
Date Range: 06/28/2013
Location: Alexander Library, Rutgers University
Primary URL: http://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/news/nj-state-invention-conference-alexander-library-sat-june-28th


Digital Native American & Indigenous Studies Workshop
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Digital Native American & Indigenous Studies Workshop
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Author: Tobias Glaza
Abstract: YIPP hosted NEH-sponsored Workshop designed to educate participants on issues of digital humanities research and methodology in the context of Native American Studies
Date Range: June 29-July 1, 2016
Location: Yale Divinity School, Yale University, New Haven, CT
Primary URL: https://www.neh.gov/divisions/odh/institutes/digital-native-american-and-indigenous-studies
Secondary URL: http://campuspress.yale.edu/yipp/digital-native-american-indigenous-studies-workshop-at-yale/


Cataloging Native American Imprints Workshop
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Cataloging Native American Imprints Workshop
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Author: Tobias Glaza
Abstract: Workshop that brought regional scholars of New England Native American Studies together to address the ways that the American Antiquarian Society could modernize their approach to cataloguing their Indian materials.
Date Range: 5/10/2016
Location: American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA


Access to Cultural Heritage Primary Sources as a Human Right
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Access to Cultural Heritage Primary Sources as a Human Right
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: Presentation to an audience of scholars and United Nations officials indicating that providing Native American communities access to their historical record is a type of human right.
Date Range: 4/112016
Location: Yale University, New Haven, CT
Primary URL: http://ipch.yale.edu/event/cultural-diversity-and-heritage-preservation-panel-discussion
Secondary URL: https://www.facebook.com/yaleindianpapersproject/photos/pb.356092251176711.-2207520000.1466660726./915784928540771/?type=3&theater


Indigenous Studies Roundtable
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Indigenous Studies Roundtable
Abstract: Discussion related to the use of digital media to foster education, research, and outreach within Indigenous communities and studies. This event is part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous issues not only in New England, but also in the United States and internationally as well.
Date Range: 3/4/2016
Location: John Carter Brown Library, Brown University, Providence, RI
Primary URL: https://www.brown.edu/academics/libraries/john-carter-brown/event/2016/03/04/roundtable


A Introduction to The Yale Indian Papers Project with Some Linguistic Considerations
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: A Introduction to The Yale Indian Papers Project with Some Linguistic Considerations
Author: Tobias Glaza
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: Presentation and discussion to the New England Algonkian Language Working Group (composed of Native and Non-native linguists and scholars) about the linguistic resources of YIPP
Date Range: 3/3/2016
Location: Yale University, New Haven, CT


Using the New England Indian Papers Series
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Using the New England Indian Papers Series
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: Instructional presentation to HIS 2040 Survey of Native American History to 1877 Seminar (Wayne State, K. Marrero). Class worked solely on YIPP documents, looking at developing themes in New England Indian history and law. Spring/Fall Semester
Date Range: January 27, 2015
Location: Wayne State University, Detroit, MI


Recovering and Remembering Slavery in the Native Atlantic World
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Recovering and Remembering Slavery in the Native Atlantic World
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: Participation in Yale Graduate Student seminar "Representing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain Workshop," sponsored by Yale Center for British Art and Lewis Walpole Library
Date Range: December 9-10, 2014
Location: Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington, CT
Primary URL: http://calendar.yale.edu/cal/opa/day/20141209/All/CAL-2c9cb3cd-496cdb6c-0149-e7e2541f-00003af3bedework@yale.edu/


A Brief History of the Missionary Project to the Indians of New England
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: A Brief History of the Missionary Project to the Indians of New England
Author: Tobias Glaza
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Abstract: Presentation and participation in Summer Study atYale Divinity School seminar.
Date Range: July 2014
Location: Yale Divinity School, Yale University, New Haven, CT


Writing of Indigenous New England: Building Partnerships for the Preservation of Regional Native American Literature
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Writing of Indigenous New England: Building Partnerships for the Preservation of Regional Native American Literature
Author: Paul Grant-Costa
Author: Siobhan Senier
Author: Jane Anderson
Author: James E. Francis
Author: Loren Spears
Author: Donald Soctomah
Author: Linda Coombs
Author: Margaret Lukens
Author: Janet Dean
Author: Joan Lester
Abstract: With support from the NEH, the University of New Hampshire (UNH) convened a group of regional Native American knowledge keepers, humanities scholars, and digitization and intellectual property experts for project and planning activities associated with the online portal, Writing of Indigenous New England, currently in beta phase. Complementing some of the high-profile digitization efforts now under way in places like the American Philosophical Society and Yale University, our project aims to stimulate grassroots digitization efforts among small tribal museums and elders’ personal collections. Quietly and independently, these collections have preserved an archive of Native American writing almost unknown even to the most knowledgeable scholars. Writing of Indigenous New England thus fills in Native people’s regional literary history, while empowering them to make their own choices about which documents to make public.
Date Range: 10/30-31/2014
Location: University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
Primary URL: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PW-51549-14


Plimoth Plantation Interpretive Planning Conference
Grant details: RQ-50742-13
Title: Plimoth Plantation Interpretive Planning Conference
Abstract: NEH-sponsored conference gathering scholars of Native New England to reconceptualize Plimoth Plantation's Interpretation
Date Range: 10/23-25/2014
Location: Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, MA


The Philosophies of Robert Grosseteste and Richard Rufus of Cornwall
Grant details: RQ-50812-14
Title: The Philosophies of Robert Grosseteste and Richard Rufus of Cornwall
Author: Neil Lewis
Abstract: The workshop was held at Georgetown University in Washington, DC on Friday March 11 and Saturday March 12, 2016. The theme of the workshop was the philosophy of Robert Grosseteste and Richard Rufus of Cornwall. A group of scholars working on the philosophical thought of these figures shared their work on them with each other. In addition to helping understand these philosophers better, the organizer hoped the conference would increase awareness of the importance of Richard Rufus and Robert Grosseteste. Presenters were Richard Rufus Project (RRP) editors, Neil Lewis and Rega Wood who introduced Richard Rufus and explained the significance of Grosseteste's influence on Rufus; a past RRP contributor, R. James Long, who helped clarify Rufus' attacks on Richard Fishacre; Santiago Melo-Arias, who has been preparing English translations for the RRP website, on Rufus's fundamental ontological views; Wood again, with Rufus on Universals; Chris Martin on the relevance of Rufus' understanding of Aristotelian epistemology to contemporary disputes; Jennifer Ottman on the influence of Rufus; and Timothy Noone, the only presenter without an affiliation with RRP, on Rufus' critical response to St. Bonaventure.
Date Range: 03/11/2016-03/12/2016
Location: Center for Medieval Philosophy, Georgetown University, Washington, DC
Primary URL: http://cmp.georgetown.edu/conferences
Primary URL Description: Center for Medieval Philosophy's conference website


“Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 Monograph”
Grant details: RQ-50842-14
Title: “Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 Monograph”
Author: Aaron Glass
Author: Judith Berman
Abstract: In 1897, anthropologist Franz Boas published The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, a synthesis of his initial research on the Northwest Coast with materials authored by his Indig