Grant products: Course or Curricular Material (537)
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Assignments- Defining Creole
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Defining Creole
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Defining the term Creole
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Lynn Strong
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Dr. Lovell Agwaramgbo
Abstract: Course materials to provide students and faculty with IRB Human Research Training and Worskhops prior to interviews
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Ethnographies
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Ethnographies
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Materials to write an ethnography of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Author: Mark Raymond
Abstract: Training and materials for filming of interviews. 2 sessions with hands-on work.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Lesson plans and materials for documenting cultural traditions of New Orleans Creoles and/or of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Defining Creole and Creole terms
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Defining Creole and Creole terms
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Abstract: Material on the definitions of Creole and Creole terms such as "boo" or "beaucoup"
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Autobiography: Culture 2017
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Autobiography: Culture 2017
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This is the second assignment infusing culture into the curriculum for the first-year experience; this one refreshes the student autobiographical assignment adding lessons learned from the introduction to folklore, What is Culture?
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing Folklore to students, the field of folklore, what folklorists do, what we will do at Dillard University in Documenting and Defining Black Creole Culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing students to Creole, the process, language, culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This undergraduate curriculum guide introduces students to Folklore through the lens of culture. It includes Faith as a cultural practice. From defining necessary concepts such as tales, fables, to demonstrating Tradition Bearers who create artifacts and cultural practice, this guide gives an overview with contemporary media links of examples.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: After introducing Folklore, this is one of two assignments given in the first-year seminar applying features of the introduction to Folklore, this assignment investigates Hip Hop as Cultural Practice.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Grant details: AB-253419-17
Title: Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Author: Anthony Dixon, Ph.D.,
Author: Jeanette Ford, Ph.D.
Author: A. Preston, Ph.D.
Author: E. Mowatt, Ph.D.
Abstract: Please see Appendix A.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Grant details: AB-258964-18
Title: Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Author: Dr. Carla J. Bell (PI) and Dr. Lisa Bratton (Co PI)
Abstract: (TSACS) in conjunction with the department of History was awarded a grant to develop humanities subject matter and content – architecture, education, history and philosophy – for a first-ever 18-credit-hour interdisciplinary minor in African American studies with a concentration in the Tuskegee Architects and the History of the Built Environment in the South. The minor will explore ways of thinking, researching and writing about the diverse experiences of African-Americans and human culture — such endeavors at an HBCU are often more limited in the curricular sense. The new minor seeks to extend African American history and liberal arts, formally into the architecture curriculum through new humanities offerings – and in so doing, provide a more focused historical perspective for students’ current educational and professional trajectories. The minor will be discipline specific to architecture and seeks to integrate humanities approach into the professional training of architects and builders. Unlike many historical arguments, this minor goes beyond documenting educational inequities and offers an alternative curriculum that will advance diverse issues and inclusiveness in architecture and humanities education. The product of the worksop will be the development of three new architecture course syllabi for classes beginning fall 2018. This minor will serve as a model for other HBCUs with Schools of Architecture and will unveil how to integrate the humanities into other professional disciplines as well as stimulate the revision of existing humanities courses to bridge humanities studies with professional schools.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.tuskegee.edu/Content/Uploads/Tuskegee/files/TSACS/Architecture/AfAmMinorApp-DanielsUpdate-Final-10.12.20.pdf
Primary URL Description: AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY IN ARCHITECTURE MINOR CURRICULUM SHEET
Audience: Undergraduate


History 375: Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past
Grant details: AB-269212-20
Title: History 375: Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past
Author: Edward Holt
Abstract: Upper-division course in Digital Humanities for History Department, Data Analytics Certificate, and Future DH Minor Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past develops a fundamental understanding of geospatial information management and analysis methods. The course will expose students to a variety of exemplary projects, applied methods, and tools for spatial history through which students will be able to define spatial problems and design solutions across a variety of disciplines.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


English 375: Digital Methods for Literary Text Mining
Grant details: AB-269212-20
Title: English 375: Digital Methods for Literary Text Mining
Author: James Clawson
Abstract: Upper-division course in Digital Humanities for English Department, Data Analytics Certificate, and Future DH Minor For newspapers, social media, product reviews, and poetry, text is the medium of meaning. But its unstructured format demands unique strategies for bringing order to chaos: discovering general information, identifying distinctive details, recognizing topics or themes, and evaluating sentiment. In this project-based course, students will use tools and methods of data analysis to ask questions about texts and communicate the answers. Students will learn progressively complex applications of text data mining to understand the information that can be found within sets of documents. With special emphasis on literary texts, the course will also discuss and provide opportunities to study the relevance of text mining to fields like public health, business, science, and security.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Grant details: AB-50120-12
Title: Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Author: Dr. Philip J. Merrill & Mrs. Betty Merrill; Veronica Carr; Dr. Marilyn D. Button
Abstract: This DVD offers six modules, each covering a different aspect of the global heritage and legacy of Lincoln University of Pennsylvania. It includes interviews with well known Lincoln University alumni, including Carol Black, Hersey Gray and explores current student perspectives on their Lincoln University education. This DVD is of general interest, and designed specifically for classroom use to enhance student awareness of the unique roles that Lincoln alumni have played in important national and international developments, including and especially Civil Rights.
Year: 2015
Audience: General Public


Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Grant details: AC-226779-15
Title: Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Author: See participating faculty names in "Accomplishments" section
Abstract: Upon completion of the Faculty Development workshops, faculty participants revised their syllabi to integrate at least three (3) assignments/activities cultivating two (2) or more of the project's designated global competencies into their classes.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://bmcc.libguides.com/global; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503377; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503127
Primary URL Description: fall 2015, summer 2016, and fall 2016 faculty cohort information.
Audience: Undergraduate


Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Grant details: AC-234283-16
Title: Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Author: Emily Clark (professor and grant cohort member)
Author: Zenon Culverhouse
Abstract: Trauma Studies Minor, a track that stems from the proposed Medical Humanities Minor, housed in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. CHASS faculty is uniquely positioned to understand and lead transformative work in the rapidly growing area of trauma studies. Currently existing programs in trauma studies world-wide focus exclusively on psychological and psychiatric approaches. The multi-disciplinary, intersectional approach to Trauma Studies that has emerged from the grant work at UIW will be unique in that it leverages the scholarship and deep expertise across several disciplines to work together to share knowledge, develop innovative ways to address trauma, and to share these findings with our local community as well as with academic communities within and outside of UIW. In essence, the trauma track of this minor allows students to develop a broad and nuanced understanding of traumatic experience and, more importantly, apply that knowledge in their careers and daily lives. The trauma track also requires that students complete some of their service hours at an organization that aids traumatized populations (such as combat veterans, immigrants, and victims of sexual or domestic violence).
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Author: Susan Roberson
Abstract: Using literary and theoretical texts this course will explore the characteristics of South Texas Women Writers. Doing so, students will read key literary texts, some critical essays about the borderlands and women's writing. They will write reflection papers on the texts and construct a cultural project that demonstrates their understanding of the culture from which the literature arises.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Chicana/o Literature
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: Chicana/o Literature
Author: Jody Marin
Abstract: This course contextualized the Chicano Movement and explored issues of subjectivity, identity, and agency as they pertain to Chicanidad through the study of Chicana/o literature.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: South Texas Women Artists
Author: Stephanie Salazar-Amaro
Abstract: • In her high school Humanities class, Stephanie Salazar-Amaro used poetry from the Entre Malinche y Guadalupe collection, art from Carmen Lomas Garza, and passages from La Frontera/Borderlands by Gloria Anzaldúa. She did some cross curricular work with the Spanish teacher to help the students understand the Spanish language portions of the passage and was able to guide the students through an analysis of the texts/art pieces. The students enjoyed looking at familiar scenes, and those who were unfamiliar with the material asked questions. As a class, they were able to discuss the family traditions in South Texas and how they were portrayed in art. Stephanie intends to use more poetry and passages in her AP Literature class next six weeks
Year: 2018
Audience: K - 12


Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: This is a collaborative writing assignment. You will collaborate with an interview participant in building content for your paper. Also keep in mind that your fellow 1301 students and I are your audience. Tell your story in a way that will be interesting to those outside of your story—your readers.Select from one of the following topics. If you have an idea beyond what's listed below, send me a message.?Interview a family member about a specific family recipe or food tradition. Family recipes could be something unique to your family, or your family's background. Or maybe it's a common dish you eat regularly, but it has special associations for you. (These are just examples - you may use any family food story that's interesting to you!)?Interview someone from your community about a food tradition. Do you have a neighbor who takes pride in their BBQ? Have you ever wondered how that Cambodian donut shop owner started their business? Interview them and write about it.?Explore the roots of a family meal. How does it come together? What's its significance for you and your family? Who prepares it? Are there any rituals surrounding it?
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Author: Michael Berberich
Abstract: You need to begin by writing an opening paragraph that provides your readers with an overview of what the project is about. [Summer semester 2018 the container was filled with multiple colored peppercorns.] You can be creative here if you want. That means you can imagine and invent a context for the assignment that goes beyond information I have provided; you cannot change or alter the rules of the assignment, however. To begin, you should define any key terms that will be implemented in any your methodologies. After all, readers need to know what it is exactly that you are counting. So, for example, what will count as a red peppercorn? This is what is known as an existential question, i.e., something that addresses the very nature of a thing. All explanations in the assignment must be written in full sentences.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Food History
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Food History
Author: Larry Blomstedt
Abstract: Selections from various authors discussing historical foodways.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: I am offering students the option of participating in a service learning project, which will substitute for some of the required elements of the course. For fall semester 2019, students can choose to complete two full shifts (these vary in length) with one of the following local food-related projects: Before you select a Service Learning project, click on the links below to learn more about these excellent Galveston community organizations. Galveston’s Own Farmer’s Market Sunday shifts from 8:00-1:00 Galveston College Food For Thought: Food Scholarship Program, Wednesday shifts on 9/18 and 10/23 from 9:30-1:30 GOFM Young Gardeners Program, Select Saturday Shifts at Rosenberg Elementary, Oppe Elementary, L.A. Morgan Elementary, and Crenshaw Elementary TBA Seeding Galveston, Shifts/Workdays TBA
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Author: Sufian
Abstract: revised the teaching guide framework document in response to feedback from experts in year one and from faculty core and team members at end of year one.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Author: Sufian
Abstract: Revised HHP Framework document, responsive to project team, experts, and faculty core feedback.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


Teaching the History of Slavery and Enslaved People
Grant details: AC-258915-18
Title: Teaching the History of Slavery and Enslaved People
Author: Caleb Dagnall, Jonathan Mercantini, Elizabeth Hyde
Abstract: Website with teaching resources, including primary and secondary sources, on slavery and the enslaved in Revolutionary America.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://https://sites.google.com/kean.edu/williamlivingstonsworld/teaching-with-livingston/teaching-the-history-of-slavery-and-enslaved-persons?authuser=0
Primary URL Description: The resources on this page – drawn from the archived letters of William Livingston and his family, John Kean and Susan Livingston Kean Nemciewicz, and Liberty Hall more broadly – allow for the exploration of a range of facets related to the history of the institution of slavery and the experiences of the enslaved in Revolutionary era America. While efforts to reconstruct the history of the enslaved at Liberty Hall are ongoing there is much work to be done before we will fully understand their lives and labor. The sources we do have must be used carefully as they are all from the perspective of white slaveholders. The Livingston family and Liberty Hall from the period of 1772-1790 provides an example of slavery in the north and the impact and limits of revolutionary ideas and rhetoric with regard to the institution of slavery. Recapturing this history is essential to understanding the institution of slavery and its impact, nationally, regionally, and locally. The resources available
Audience: General Public


US History & EN105 Assignments/Syllabus
Grant details: AC-258929-18
Title: US History & EN105 Assignments/Syllabus
Author: Brozyna, Martha & Della Fera, Alexandra
Abstract: USI History Assignment USII History Assignment EN105 Syllabus
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


HUA196 Latin American Art
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUA196 Latin American Art
Author: Liena Vayzman
Abstract: This course introduces students to the visual art traditions of Latin America through lecture, readings, and discussion. Topics include: pre-Hispanic art and architecture, Latina/o art, Spanish/Portuguese colonial-era art, Mexican moderism, and post-colonial art. Students analyze the meaning and techniques of selected artworks in Latin American art history through written assignments and oral presentations.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM107 Music of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUM107 Music of Latin America
Author: William Fulton
Abstract: This course is a survey of the music of Latin America, from Brazilian samba to Dominican bachata and more. Latin American musical developments from the past and present will be studied to show the individual characteristics as well as the common elements within various styles, while considering the global impact of Latin Music genres. This course will expand students' understanding of world cultures and global issues through an interdisciplinary lens.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Author: Ryan Mann-Hamilton
Abstract: This course will focus on the different peoples and cultures of Latin America, including Indigenous groups, Afro descendant communities, European emigrants and other communities engaged in the formation of the category of mestizo. The social and cultural organization of each of these groups will be examined, particularly in their relationship to the larger society. The impact of the global economy on Latin American cultures will also be examined.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Author: Belkis González
Abstract: This course examines the literary and cultural production of hispanophone, francophone, and anglophone regions of the Caribbean and of the Caribbean diaspora in the U.S. It surveys the variety of Caribbean writing, exploring how its texts represent community, class, race, gender, culture, nation, and ethnicity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will analyze literature alongside visual culture, musical genres, and historical narratives.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUN192 Art and Society
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUN192 Art and Society
Author: Arianne Fernandez
Abstract: Students will create a reaction piece that will highlight an issue of their choosing in a particular neighborhood of NYC. The work must be influenced in some way by the body of work of at least one Latin American artist from the list provided by the instructor.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Author: Ernesto Menéndez-Conde
Abstract: This low stake assignment was developed upon attending to the Seminar Enriching Latin American Studies. This seminar helped me to understand cultural processes in Latin American in a deeper manner. It particularly helped me to be more aware of the connections between the Marvelous Real -as Cuban writer Alejo Carpentier defines the term- and transculturation, as defined by Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz. I am also interested in developing interdisciplinary approaches in my Latin American Fiction in Translation (ELS250) class. With this assignment, I would like to explore the links between Alejo Carpentier’s writing and music, while helping students to appreciate Carpentier’s prose, and the links between Baroque aesthetics, transculturation and the concept of Latin American Marvelous Real.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Author: Juan Recondo
Abstract: This course will introduce students to theatre and performance practices throughout the Americas (U.S. Latinx community, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Hispanophone Caribbean). We will examine how the drama reflects the different histories and cultures of Latin America. Furthermore, we will explore an intercultural dialogue between national dramas to identify connections between the different Americas. The course will delve into topics dealing with politics, history, dictatorship and revolution, imperialism and colonialism, identity (gender, sexual, national, and racial/ethnic, among others), borders, mestizaje, and indigenous performances. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the scholarship and drama of Latin America and the artists’ relation to U.S. and European cultural practices.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Author: Cory Rowe-Feldman
Abstract: Dr. Rowe-Feldman's assignment uses excerpts from Kirsten Weld's Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala to explore history, memory, and justice in Guatemala and the United States. In a multi-part assignment, she asks students to compare excerpts from Paper Cadavers with materials in LaGuardia's archive collection. Ultimately students examine how societies forget and remember political violence.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Program Articulation Agreement with Brooklyn College
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Program Articulation Agreement with Brooklyn College
Author: Arthur Lau
Author: Paul Arcario
Author: Alejandro Alonso
Author: Anne Lopes
Abstract: This document is ann articulation agreement of thr Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option at LaGuardia with thr Soanish Department at Brooklyn College.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Curriculum Map for the Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Curriculum Map for the Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option
Author: Ana Maria Hernandez
Author: Hugo Fernandez
Author: William Fulton
Author: Rebecca Tally
Abstract: This map, to be used by college advisors, serves as an advisement tool to locate the best times when students can take courses in the option.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1B: Argument and Analysis
Grant details: AC-264007-19
Title: ENGL 1B: Argument and Analysis
Author: Richard McNabb
Author: Faith Kirk
Author: Colton Saylor
Author: Sheree Kirby
Author: Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite
Abstract: ENGL 1B is a writing course that focuses on argumentation and analysis. Students will approach argument from an historical perspective. Through the study of literary, rhetorical, and professional texts, you will be introduced to different theories from ancient times to the twenty-first century. You will also learn how to apply this literacy to write persuasively in different rhetorical situations. You will learn to write arguments using the logical, ethical, and emotional strategies of classical Greece, the theological and socio-cultural techniques of the Middle Ages, the courtly and political strategies of the Renaissance, the psychological and gendered techniques of the Enlightenment, the negotiation and collaborative strategies of the twentieth century, and the stylistic and grammatical structures of the twenty-first century.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG335 Community Writing: Great Falls revised syllabus
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ENG335 Community Writing: Great Falls revised syllabus
Author: Dr. Julie O'Connell
Abstract: Course: ENG 335: Community Writing: The Great Falls, 3 c Semester: Fall 2020 Each of us is a member of a variety of communities (neighborhood, workplace, house of worship, team, town, state, country, world, just to name a few). We navigate these communities daily: transitioning between them and often defining ourselves by them. Writing gives all of us an opportunity to extend audience outside of the traditional and sometimes constricting academic context. Community Writing promotes citizenship. In general, the course is theme based depending on the instructor’s preference. Themes might include economic inequality, race, gender, the local food revolution, climate change, human suffering, immigration, homelessness, prisons, etc. Over the course of the semester, students read the perspectives of a variety of thinkers (social scientists, biologists, educational theorists, journalists, citizens, etc.). Texts are posted in the Brightspace shell for the course. The class assumes a workshop format with in-class discussion and regular reading and writing assignments outside of the classroom. Students write papers and keep a weekly journal. For this particular class, students conduct interviews with individuals from  Paterson. They complete a variety of research and writing tasks that may include articles, interviews, profiles, histories, reports, fact sheets, reviews, and web-based writing of use to audiences outside of the University. Some of the writing for the course will be published and distributed to a much larger audience and to different kinds of readers than the student is accustomed to, allowing them to experience how their writing affects the community.  In addition to making a difference in the community, the course aims to make impressive additions to students' résumés and, in many cases, help them obtain internships and other work opportunities for the future.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://N/A
Audience: Undergraduate


ART245 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ART245 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Author: Prof. Michael Kyklewicz
Abstract: • Course (number & name): ART-246-R Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson • Semester: Fall 2020 This course is dedicated to image construction and manipulation. Students will begin to work with traditional art materials, moving on to experiement and elaborate within the digital realm and finally realizing their completed project in printed form. •
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Author: Dr. Déborah Gómez
Abstract: This is the new Spanish 1 curriculum at Florida Memorial University, our HBCU partner. Please see the attached syllabus.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HwvffJ4c5DKTV8ObSoq3HuZQj2bvq3Xx/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: Link to new syllabus
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Abstract: This is an example unit that shows the pedagogical tasks that we are creating for the FMU new Spanish language curriculum.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1eUM8ISuCKRUlXNa8skcOGgPsjykpQHj5?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


Beginning Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish I
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-101. Beginning Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This beginning level language course is an introduction to the Kurdish language and the student will develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Kurdish. Additionally, the student will acquire cultural appreciation.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: World Languages and Cultures department houses this course.
Audience: Undergraduate


Beginning Kurdish II
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish II
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-102. Beginning Kurdish II. 3 Hours. A continuation and further development of the basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing of Kurdish, and cultural appreciation, introduced in KURD-101: Beginning Kurdish I.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Intermediate Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Intermediate Kurdish I
Author: Ibrahim Bor
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: KURD-201. Intermediate Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach intermediate-level Kurdish to enable students to function in informal, formal, and academic contexts where Kurdish is spoken or used as a medium of communication and/or research.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Author: Mucahit Bilici
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: WLC-200K. Kurdish Culture. 3 Hours. This course introduces students to various aspects of Kurdish society. The course incorporates a number of perspectives: anthropological, sociological and cultural studies. It provides an overview of Kurdish society with special attention given to questions of identity, history, important literary and cultural texts and figures, music and dance, food and folkways. Finally, contemporary challenges faced by various parts of Kurdish society will be explored in relation to statelessness and diaspora.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Author: Ibrahim Demir
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: The teacher training workshop will present practices and techniques related to the teaching of foreign and second languages to both children and adults. The workshop will further train teachers who are competent in implementing standards-based Kurdish language instruction in their classrooms. The participants will learn how to integrate culture, content, and language in Kurdish instruction at various proficiency levels and needs. The workshop will also address effective practices and innovative language teaching and will disseminate some of the materials developed for the Summer School of Kurdish Language and Culture conducted at Northeastern Illinois University.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


HUM 305: Art and Power
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 305: Art and Power
Author: C. Martin Caver
Abstract: This course is an introduction to aesthetics, the philosophical study of beauty. Specifically, we will examine beauty’s relationship to the political sphere. We will begin by examining some theories of aesthetic judgment, before turning to look at the relationship between art and politics, the way art is central in both propaganda and protest, and how we make sense of art’s relationship to political power. In particular we look at aesthetic movements such as the Black Arts Movement (BAM), the Chicano movement, and others to evaluate how aesthetic judgment relates to political judgment.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 306: A People's History of Chicago
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 306: A People's History of Chicago
Author: Bethany Harding
Abstract: This course examines the history and culture of Chicago through the experiences of ordinary people of all races and backgrounds who have lived and worked here. How did Chicago go from a minor outpost on the frontier to a major metropolis? What social and cultural conditions inspired Chicago’s great artists, writers, and activists, and how did those individuals drive the events that define the city’s past? What made Chicago into a cradle of progressivism, home to racial and social justice movements that have inspired the nation and the world? These and other questions inform our study of the “City of Big Shoulders.”
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 311: In Search of the Meaning of Life
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 311: In Search of the Meaning of Life
Author: Sarah Syed
Abstract: This course engages with the following fundamental questions: What is the meaning of life (and death)? What is the value of life? How do we define death? What aspects of our humanity are visible in how we confront life’s temporal limitations? Students in this course apply philosophical theories to humanistic exemplars from history, art, and literature. They do this through a variety of student-centered activities, close readings of texts, and in-class debates. In particular they are called to reflect on their own experiences and encounters with birth, life, and death, grappling with the status of both our natality and our mortality.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Historical Skills Crosswalk and Rubric
Grant details: AC-269265-20
Title: Historical Skills Crosswalk and Rubric
Author: Lane Sobehrad
Author: Mellinee Lesley
Author: Rene Saldana
Author: Julie Smit
Author: Elizabeth Stewart
Abstract: Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this project, the project team developed a historical skills crosswalk for project stakeholders that aligns national standards, state standards, and professional standards across relevant fields. The project team stratified these skills into three general categories: (1) Reading Skills; (2) Thinking Skills; and (3) Writing Skills. These skills were then adapted into an overall rubric to assist teachers participating in establishing practical student learning outcomes and proficiency standards.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ek0cVrgydB-3NBZqjfq5HlYc_Qf44N3-JskhR7fcfBg/edit?usp=sharing
Audience: K - 12


The Water and Culture Reader
Grant details: AC-50067-09
Title: The Water and Culture Reader
Author: Department of English, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio
Abstract: This anthology is being used as a required text book in English Composition I and II and World Literature Studies. It contains articles that are divided into the following chapters: Sacred Water, Global Water, Water in San Antonio and the Southwest, Water in Asia, Water in Africa, Water in Literature: Poetry, and Water in Literature; Prose. Thus, it reflects the thematic and geographical scope of the lecture series over the past three years. The proceeds from this book are directed to a restricted fund and will allow us to sustain the lecture series and related activities the grant afforded us well into the future.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Author: Nayereh Tohidi
Abstract: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/ws
Audience: Undergraduate


JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Author: Jody Myers
Abstract: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Graduate


PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Author: Homa Esfarjani
Abstract: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/mcll/
Audience: Undergraduate


RS346: Sufism
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: RS346: Sufism
Author: Mustafa Ruzgar
Abstract: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Undergraduate


JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Author: Melissa Wall
Abstract: In this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: n this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/journalism/index.html
Audience: Graduate


ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Author: Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and on the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, etc.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Author: Dr. Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, weather, etc. This section is mostly lab work.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Grant details: AC-50146-12
Title: New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Author: Dr. Montserrat Reguant
Author: Dr. Julie Feldman-Abe
Author: Dr. Jane Crawford
Author: Dr. Paul Green
Author: Dr. Michelle Fine
Author: Dr. Alan Lee
Author: Dr. David Leese
Author: Patty Melnick
Abstract: As a result of the activities carried out during this grant period (AC-50146-12), and pursuant to the grant outcomes, Mount St. Mary's College faculty members revised and created a total of 15 new courses with the goal of internationalizing the curricula of said courses. Courses created and revised were: BUS 183, CS 117, CS 120, CS 280, EDU 199/299, ENG 126, HUM 264, HUM 269H, HUM 271, CS, NUR 160, NUR 161, PHIL 15, PHIL 21, PHIL 152, PT 476.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.msmc.la.edu/academics/neh-grant-experience/grant-outcomes.asp
Primary URL Description: This URL links to a site that houses the syllabi for the new and modified courses.
Audience: Graduate


The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Author: Dr. Anderson Brown
Author: Dr. J. Fernando Vega
Author: Dr. Ana Nieves
Abstract: A team taught course titled "Mind, Consciousness, and Computers" is a General Education Course that explores the philosophical, psychological, and technological interdisciplinary aspects and uses of Artificial Intelligence.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana L. Collins
Abstract: Appropriate Technology: Detailed description for second offering of course Following the appropriate technology tradition and philosophy of technology as theoretical frameworks, this course examines practices of technology innovation and engineering design, and conceptions of human progress. The student develops skills in scientific reasoning and philosophy to be able to critique contemporary technological culture and compare alternative technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally. A partir de la tradición en tecnología apropiada y la filosofía de la tecnología como marcos teóricos, este curso examina prácticas de innovación en tecnología y de diseño ingenieril, y conceptos de progreso humano. El estudiante desarrolla habilidades en razonamiento científico y en filosofía para poder hacer un análisis crítico de la cultura tecnológica contemporánea y poder comparar opciones tecnológicas alternas que están orientadas a lograr sustentabilidad y a promover el bienestar humano en las comunidades y globalmente.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana Collins
Abstract: The second offering of the course Appropriate and Alternative Technologies required a revised syllabus that responded to the student evaluations for the first offering of the course. This revised syllabus included a revised reading list for the students as well as revising the objectives of the course. The fifth objective was revised as follows: 5. Students will be encouraged to develop a shared sense of responsibility for choosing and for collaborating in bringing about the technologies that go with achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: ecourses.uprm.edu
Primary URL Description: This is published on the moodle page for the University.
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture from ancient times (including the Babylonian and Egyptian cultures) through the Renaissance will be examined. This course will address the enduring questions of "What is progress", What defines us as human beings", and "How does technology affect our culture".
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture from the 1600's to present times will be examined. This course will address the enduring questions of "What is progress", What defines us as human beings", and "How does technology affect our culture".
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Technology, Justice, and Wellbeing (revised course)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Technology, Justice, and Wellbeing (revised course)
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Abstract: Study of contemporary technological culture and comparison with alternative and appropriate technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability, improving the conditions of life on earth and satisfying the needs of the community. En español: Estudio de la cultura tecnológica contemporánea y comparación con opciones tecnológicas alternativas y apropiadas orientadas a la sustentabilidad, a mejorar las condiciones de vida en la tierra, y a satisfacer las necesidades de la comunidad. Following the appropriate technology tradition and philosophy of technology as theoretical frameworks, this course examines practices of technology innovation and engineering design, and conceptions of human progress. The student develops skills in scientific reasoning and philosophy to be able to critique contemporary technological culture and compare alternative technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Mind, Consciousness, and Machines
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Mind, Consciousness, and Machines
Author: José Fernando Vega
Author: Anderson Brown
Author: Ana Nieves-Rosa
Abstract: Interdisciplinary study of the concept of “Intelligence” from the perspectives of Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Artificial Intelligence is studied in relation to an understanding of human intelligence, its meanings, the theories that support them, and other associated aspects, such as: learning, perception, memory, mind, brain, and consciousness, among others. The course includes laboratory demonstrations of existing Artificial Intelligence technologies, as well as class debates.
Year: 2012
Audience: Undergraduate


Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: Study of the origin and evolution of the universe, life, and thought from the perspectives of physics, biology, and philosophy. Students will explore the deep complexity of the universe and life through an introductory integrated examination of the dynamic process of evolution of three different objects: the Cosmos (with their fundamental constituents and natural laws), Life (from its origin to human beings), and Belief (from primitive cultures and ancient civilizations to present societies).
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: Study of the origin and evolution of the universe, life, and thought from the perspectives of physics, biology, and philosophy. Students will explore the deep complexity of the universe and life through an introductory integrated examination of the dynamic process of evolution of three different objects: the Cosmos (with their fundamental constituents and natural laws), Life (from its origin to human beings), and Belief (from primitive cultures and ancient civilizations to present societies).
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Guide for the Creation of Interdisciplinary, Team-taught Courses
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Guide for the Creation of Interdisciplinary, Team-taught Courses
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Dana L. Collins
Author: Nayda Santiago
Author: Lucas Avilés
Author: Roberto Seijo
Author: Héctor Jiménez
Abstract: Guide to requesting to teach an interdisciplinary, team-taught course. This guide was created in order to ensure the good implementation and continuation of the interdisciplinary, team-taught course format.
Year: 2016
Audience: Other


Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence
Author: Dana L. Collins
Author: Nayda Santiago
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Roberto Seijo
Author: Héctor Jiménez
Author: Lucas Avilés
Abstract: The Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence is a sequence of five (5) courses that explore the enduring humanistic questions from diverse perspectives. Two of the courses are a study of Western Culture, while the remaining three courses are interdisciplinary, team-taught courses that consider the areas of artificial intelligence, alternative and appropriate technologies, and the origins of the universe.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Integrating Indigenous Identities
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Integrating Indigenous Identities
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Ann Olson
Abstract: This course, INDIG 4XX, functions as a culminating thematic course that complements, complicates and deepens previous courses taken in the NAIS Program. Additional pre-requisites ensure that students are prepared to engage with complex analysis and critical research essay writing formats. Placed in the fourth year, the course is the final “examination” of themes and community/research processes explored throughout the NAIS curriculum. The seminar format of this course limits the number of students to ensure full and deep engagement with the teaching and learning opportunities. True to the format of the FOUR KEY NAIS courses, INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS IDENTITIES (NAIS 4XX) will incorporate and interconnect both intergenerational research and community internships with major course themes. The course will be taught through a collaborative teaching model the goal of which is to enlist our NAIS Advisory Board members* to continue to work with our faculty in a reciprocal teaching and learning context.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Integrating_Indigenous_Identities.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Debra Rice
Abstract: This course explores indigenous women through the lens of gender, which is not defined biologically, but instead is shaped through social roles, political rules, and community expectations. It identifies the ways in which indigenous women’s’ personal and political experiences continue to impact agency and empowerment in both their personal and public lives. Course materials will explore historical and contemporary perspectives through Native American and Latino/a authors and scholars, as well as others, as the professor’s expertise and research allows. The primary focus, however, is on indigenous communities of Native North American/Canadian tribal groups, and Central and South American tribal/community groups.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Analyzing_Indigenous_Gender.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12


Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance
Author: Apanakhi Buckley
Abstract: American Cultural Dance emphasizes North American Indian dance traditions--- their performance and history. The course examines how dance is used as expression; how American Indian dance has been oppressed in the course of conquest, and how it has been used to resist oppression.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Dance.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12


Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Pamela Fabela
Author: Miles Miller
Abstract: Thanks to the former and current Yakama Nation Museum Directors: Pamela Fabela and Miles Miller for their contributions through dialogue and guidance. All courses in the certificate are transferable to the Native American and Indigenous Studies A.A. or B.A. Degree Programs. Because the student will encounter multiple and diverse “writing opportunities” ranging from brief exhibit descriptors to professional memos and letters to group research reports, pre-entry requirements for the program are a 100 level English Composition course and a Technical Writing course. As the outcomes indicate, students will be trained in critical areas of “museum management” honing entry level transferable skills welcome in any museum environment and/or applicable to special projects in cultural center environments.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Museum_Studies.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Secondary URL: http://plateauportal.wsulibs.wsu.edu/images/help_topic1.png
Secondary URL Description: "The Plateau Peoples' Web Portal is a gateway to Plateau peoples' cultural materials held in Washington State University's Libraries, Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections (MASC), the Museum of Anthropology and national donors including the National Anthropological Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institution. The materials in the portal have been chosen and curated by the tribes. Tribal administrators, working with their tribal governments, have provided information and their own additional materials to the portal as a means of expanding and extending the archival record" (Plateau People's Portal Introduction).
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Julio Carranza, J.D.
Author: Yakama Nation Chief Judge Ted Strong
Abstract: fjsfjapofapof
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Court_Advocacy.pdf
Audience: K - 12


Communication in the U.S.-Mexico Border Politics of Border Security and Popular Cultures and Mass Media
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Communication in the U.S.-Mexico Border Politics of Border Security and Popular Cultures and Mass Media
Author: Barrera Eduardo
Abstract: This course will analyze the different theories and approaches that have been used to understand and explain popular culture and mass media in the U.S.-México border. We will analyze how the policies behind border security have evolved and how they impact and circulate in popular culture and mass media. The course will start with an overview of the theoretical perspectives of the U.S,-México border. This will followed up by a section dealing with various conceptualizations of border identities and theoretical approaches to otherness. The third section will analyze the media systems in the area and the role of violence and development of security policies and their implementation.
Year: 1915
Audience: Graduate


Mapping the Line: Cultural Representations of Borderlands Security
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Mapping the Line: Cultural Representations of Borderlands Security
Author: Robert Gunn
Abstract: This course offers a long survey of cultural representations of the multiethnic geographical region understood now as the U.S./Mexico borderlands. How did the modern apparatus of the U.S./Mexico border come to be? What are the cultural practices, social understandings, and forms of economic traffic that both contribute to its enactment of national division and difference, and are in turn regulated by its legal enforcement of political inclusion and exclusion? And how might we fashion a critical dialogue that best negotiates enduring problems of democracy and difference, freedom and security, and regional autonomy within a transnational and multiethnic space that yet belongs to an increasingly integrated and borderless world? Examining historical clusters of texts that intersected public and private realms from the early 17th Century to the 21st Century, students will gain insight into these matters by investigating the multiple practices of social definition and political enforcement, national myth-making, and cultural boundary inscription that have contributed collectively to the construction of borderlands discourse over time. Guiding and informing this endeavor will be the development of an intellectual repertoire of critical methods through close engagement with a host of theoretical texts preponderantly from beyond the strict purview of literary and cultural studies as such, but which promise to foster sophisticated understandings of the traffic between varieties of cultural and political representation, including epic poetry, literary fiction, oral storytelling, government documents and treaties, travel narratives, diaries, letters, visual art, and film.
Year: 1915
Audience: Graduate


Discourses of Displacement: Citizenship, Sovereignty and Dissolution
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Discourses of Displacement: Citizenship, Sovereignty and Dissolution
Author: Lowry Martin
Abstract: Despite the contemporary narrative of globalization that pushes us to believe that we are moving towards a world citizenship that transcends regional and national loyalties, the paradox is that contemporary globalization has generated a proliferation of borders that impacts migratory movements, guides capitalist investment, and influences political life. Borderlands, whether historic or contemporary, have relied on various forms of legal logic to underpin their existence. This course looks at the laws, assumptions, and consequences of legal rulings in creating borders, classes and citizens. First, “Discourses of Displacement” will explore the idea of “borders” as a method that will allow us to explore new perspectives on the process of nation-building. We will question how the idea of borders invites us to reassess political concepts of citizenship, sovereignty, and the function of law as an equitable social mechanism. Lastly, we will simultaneously explore representations in literature and film of borders challenge us to reexamine our ideas about justice, citizenship, and the precariousness of national identity
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Fronteras y Seguridad Humana: narrativas sobre migración y violencia
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Fronteras y Seguridad Humana: narrativas sobre migración y violencia
Author: Maria Socorro Tabuenca
Abstract: En este curso se hará un análisis multidisciplinario de diversas narrativas de frontera, o de las zonas fronterizas (gente, cultura, etc.) entre México y Estados Unidos principalmente. En este curso se cubrirán ensayos de diversas disciplinas como historia, sociología, antropología, cultura, cine y literatura. En particular se estudiarán textos literarios y fílmicos en la producción de los siglos XX y XXI y el apoyo crítico contextual se dará a través de artículos o libros de las disciplinas mencionadas. Las actividades de la clase incluyen conferencias por parte de la profesora, presentaciones y discusiones de los estudiantes sobre las lecturas asignadas, “response papers” sobre algunas lecturas, proyectos individuales y en grupo, historias de vida, conferencias con investigadores expertos en la región, y presentaciones de películas dentro y fuera de clase.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Border crossings: Humanizing the History of the US-Mexico Border, 1880-2000
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Border crossings: Humanizing the History of the US-Mexico Border, 1880-2000
Author: Yolanda Leiva
Abstract: This graduate course explores the on-going creation of the US-Mexico border as well as the diverse ways in which migrants have negotiated crossing the US-Mexico border from the 1880s through the end of the 20th century. The dividing line was created following the US-Mexico War and the signing of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. As border scholars have argued, however, border making does not end with the creation of a border line. During the time period covered by this class, the border shifted from a relatively open border to one increasingly surveilled and controlled. Immigration laws such as the 1917 Immigration Act, the 1924 creation of the Border Patrol, and the implementation of operations such as Operation Hold the Line in 1993 and Operation Gatekeeper in 1994 hardened the borderline. Yet, unequal economic developments, US federal policies, as well as political and social instability have continued to motivate on-going movement across the border. The border and border crossers remain controversial today as they have for over a century. The course will combine historical analysis of the border with personal accounts, bringing a human face to this history.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Blood and Belonging: The Ethics of Membership and the Politics of Security Along the U.S.-Mexico Border
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Blood and Belonging: The Ethics of Membership and the Politics of Security Along the U.S.-Mexico Border
Author: Ignacio Martinez
Abstract: This course will analyze the juncture between the historical and political evolution of the border and personal narrative in order to decipher the ways in which the rhetoric of belonging and border security intersect. This class advances the belief that in order to understand the policies behind border security we must utilize both a micro and macro approach, while looking at changes in policy over time and space. In order to provide the broadest possible perspective, therefore, this class will start with an inquiry into the global idea of security, its meaning and utility, and of the ethics of membership (i.e. policies of inclusion and exclusion).
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


The Children’s Story Hour: Narratives by and about Unaccompanied Children Crossing Borders in to U.S.
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: The Children’s Story Hour: Narratives by and about Unaccompanied Children Crossing Borders in to U.S.
Author: Kirsten Nigro
Abstract: The recent influx of unaccompanied children from Central America crossing into the United States illegally has shone a spotlight on a phenomenon that has a decades’, if not centuries’ long history.This course proposes to listen more carefully to the narratives told by and about immigrant children, in a variety of “textualities”: literature, drama, film, legal documents, human rights reports and charters, blog postings, transcripts of political debates, TV news clips. Whether framed as humanitarian, immigration or security crises, the stories of these children cross interdisciplinary borders for graduate-level research in border/national security and the humanities.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


An Anthropology of Graphic Medicine
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: An Anthropology of Graphic Medicine
Author: Juliet McMullin
Abstract: Course Description: The field of graphic medicine is a new and vibrant community of comics artists, humanities scholars, public health and health professionals. Graphic medicine is a term coined by physician, cartoonist, and medical humanities scholar Ian Williams and is defined as “the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of healthcare” (Graphicmedicine.org 2013). Williams launched the graphic medicine website in 2007 as an effort to recognize the increasing number of illness narratives in comic form since the mid 1990s. This class will take an anthropological lens to the field of graphic medicine and the graphic narratives that constitute the material of interest for GM. Examining the intersections of the “ordinary, chronic, and cruddy” and how they are entangled in biomedical hegemonies and medical technologies in the context of late liberalism, we will consider how graphic narratives are embedded in processes of biomedicalization, how the narratives are empowering or fostering conditions of endurance or exhaustion, and what anthropology and its methods can contribute to GM. Importantly, while the medium we are examining is visual, we are particularly interested in how graphic narratives intersect with scholarly conversations in the study of illness narratives and narrative medicine.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with the support of the NEH grant
Audience: Undergraduate


Life Narratives – Storytelling & the Power of Stories to Transform Thinking About the World
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Life Narratives – Storytelling & the Power of Stories to Transform Thinking About the World
Author: Tiffany Lopez
Abstract: COURSE OVERVIEW: This is the third quarter of the CHASS First Year Experience course sequence on “Life Narratives.” Our class focuses on storytelling and the power of stories to transform our thinking about the world with attention to matters of health and wellness for both individuals and society. The core questions: What is the foundation for effective storytelling? How do stories convey the importance of a problem or situation in a way that facts and data alone cannot? Why and how do stories create such a powerful sense of connection between storyteller and audience/community? How do we create stories that might inspire personal transformation and social change? How do we tailor storytelling for various realms (live performance, video, digital media)? How do we use storytelling to communicate scholarship and research? Ultimately, as a class, how will we create a storytelling event that shares the most important lessons gained from this year’s CHASS course sequence on the study of life narratives?
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with the support of the NEH can be found at this site.
Audience: Undergraduate


Race, Eugenics and Life Narratives in History: Understanding the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Race, Eugenics and Life Narratives in History: Understanding the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis
Author: Dana Simmons
Abstract: Our objective this quarter is to dig into the history of race, eugenics and medicine in modern history. We will use a case study or microhistory method, whereby we will seek to deeply understand one historical event as a window onto broader contexts and questions. Our focus is the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis, which took place in Macon County, Alabama from 1932-1972. This will not be an ordinary history class. The core of the quarter will be a game: a simulation of a civil lawsuit filed in federal court in 1974 by surviving study subjects and their descendents. The first few class sessions will be devoted to understanding the historical context of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: eugenics, racial science and racism. Then the game begins: each of us will be assigned a role to play in the simulation, and we will speak, write and make decisions in that character. Each party in the lawsuit will attempt to convince the jury and the public to decide in its favor. The outcome may or may not replicate what really happened, as we will see at the game’s end. However, the goal is not to recreate history. Rather, it is to fully immerse our selves in these peoples’ lives, their choices, their values and the world they moved in.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with support of the NEH can be found on this site.
Audience: Undergraduate


Powerwriting for Medical Students
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Powerwriting for Medical Students
Author: Goldberry Long
Abstract: Increased concern for the emotional component of doctoring has led to a revival in medical schools’ inclusion of the humanities into their curriculum. With the intention of fostering empathy, many medical schools offer reflective writing as a 3rd-year selective. Although this has shown some positive outcomes, reflective writing requires complex writing skills that many students lack. Educators may assume that students can write easily and fluently about their emotions, but such writing is a skill, not a given. Brief and late writing interventions limit success to those already inclined to the activity. Further, by focusing solely on empathy, such programs ignore the potential power of writing as a multifaceted cognitive tool. This paper will present an ongoing curriculum intervention that is aimed at fully exploiting the potential of writing to develop observational, analytical, and other cognitive skills. The program we designed, a 3-year writing program for medical students, fully integrates writing into the curriculum. This mandatory program introduces an innovative writing technique called Powerwriting to first-year students, when they use it as they learn patient documentation. During their second and third years, students use writing toward recognizing biases and long-term consequences of treatment plans. By the third year, all students are ready to use Powerwriting to reflect on difficult events, such as the deaths of patients. Moving in a scaffolded curriculum, from information processing to critical analysis to reflective exploration, our approach gives students a powerful writing tool for processing all kinds of information, from humanistic to medical.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: All syllabi developed with support of the NEH can be found at this site.
Audience: Other


The Body in Western Art: Antiquity to Present
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: The Body in Western Art: Antiquity to Present
Author: Jeanette Kohl
Abstract: This course introduces students to vital questions on the role of the human body and face in Western Art, from Antiquity to the present. It addresses the per se interdisciplinary nature of body images, profane and sacred, in different media and art forms, thus familiarizing students with a broad range of subjects,artworks, and cultural practices and thought patterns. Its chronologically arranged themes foster both the students' sense of historical differences and developments as well as changing notions of the human body and its 'meanings' - from the visceral to the virtual, as metaphor and matter, and as subject and object in visual representation. The course familiarizes students with central ideas of what it means to be human, beyond the Cartesian dichotomy of body and mind, and it will help them to critically evaluate the intellectual and cultural concepts behind different forms of body images. The course is art historical but also includes interdisciplinary components and overlaps with Religious Studies, Theatre Studies, History and the History of Medicine, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Psychology.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


OS207 Oral History Methods
Grant details: AD-50029-11
Title: OS207 Oral History Methods
Author: Valoree Gagnon
Abstract: In Oral History Methods, students learn how to conduct oral history projects, including practical, historical, legal, and ethical aspects. They will also explore why oral history is used in tribal, community, and academic settings, and consider its advantages and drawbacks compared to other historical methods.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Grant details: AD-50036-12
Title: MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Author: J. Craig Tompkins
Author: Jessie Ryker-Crawford
Abstract: Course Description: Digital technologies are cultural constructs and therefore can be purposefully used to transform our methods of relating and transmitting humanities content and culture to our audiences and to future generations. Instead of allowing digital technologies to shape our cultures and identity, we can shape our digital tools to better preserve, present, inform, and sustain our cultural heritages...the Software Applications for the Digital Humanities Special Topics course will introduce students to the use of emerging digital technologies in the archiving and presentation/display of cultural, visual, material, and intellectual property. Students will explore innovative ways in which digital technologies can be adapted to interact with cultural objects, such as creating condition reports of the objects. This course will engage key humanities content areas, including conservation, archives, Native American studies, and museum history.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/s/w9628865bxbqe2h/Software%20Applications%20Fall%202012%20Syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Syllabus - MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


MUSM370d Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Grant details: AD-50036-12
Title: MUSM370d Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Author: Jessie Ryker-Crawford
Author: J. Craig Tompkins
Abstract: Through a review of current trends in public accessible cultural property database systems and websites, students will critique the pros and cons of emerging digital technologies utilized in the archiving, presentation and display of culturally-based visual, material and intellectual property.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/s/68k4nnqs9welqg4/Cultural%20Representation%202013%20Spring%20Syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Syllabus - Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Comanche Centered Education
Grant details: AD-50040-12
Title: Comanche Centered Education
Author: Juanita Pahdopony
Author: Phyllis Narcomey
Author: Jimmy Arteberry
Author: Dorna Riding In-Battese
Abstract: These curricular materials support Comanche Nation College's mission to provide a 'Comanche Centered Education'. There are two components: lectures with accompanying PowerPoint, handouts, and audio recordings. Lecture topics include: Comanche Sacred Sites, Comanche Plant Use, Cedar Lesson, and Oral History by Maddische. The second component is a Comanche (Numunuu) Scrabble game designed to support learning Comanche language.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: "History of Science"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Syllabus: "History of Science"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Florence Hsia, Ph.D.
Author: Emily Redman, Ph.D.
Abstract: This is the most recent iteration of the syllabus for the project course, "History of Science." It is based on the syllabus created for the implementation semester (Fall 2018), but includes minor changes from the course's second run in Fall 2019.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/history-of-science-sample-syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the syllabus in PDF format on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: https://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click on "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Paper Assignment: "Lab Reports through Time"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Paper Assignment: "Lab Reports through Time"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Florence Hsia, Ph.D.
Author: Emily Hamilton, Ph.D.
Abstract: This paper assignment integrates one of the labs from the Scientific Revolution unit (Galileo's Inclined Plane Experiment) with lecture and discussion of the changing cultural styles and values in experimentation during the 16th and 17th centuries. First, students reproduce the inclined plane experiment under historical conditions that Galileo would have faced. Then they write up the lab report in three styles: (1) based on Galileo's model from his "Two Chief World Systems" (1632); (2) based on an experimental report that Robert Boyle published in his "Philosophical Transactions" in 1667; and (3) in the style of a standard present-day physical lab report. Finally students reflect on what changing conventions and formats of lab report can tell us about the cultural history of experimentation.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/paper-1-lab-reports-through-time.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the assignment on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab for "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: "Beyond Henrietta Lacks: Race and Medicine in 20th Century America"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Syllabus: "Beyond Henrietta Lacks: Race and Medicine in 20th Century America"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Susan Lederer, Ph.D.
Author: Liliana Busconi, Ph.D.
Abstract: This is a sample version of the syllabus for the project course, "Beyond Henrietta Lacks." It is based on the syllabus created in 2018 for the implementation semester (Spring 2019).
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/beyond-henrietta-lacks-sample-syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the syllabus on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks."
Audience: Undergraduate


Paper Assignment: "History of a Treatment: Development, Testing, Marketing, and Usage"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Paper Assignment: "History of a Treatment: Development, Testing, Marketing, and Usage"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Susan Lederer, Ph.D.
Author: Liliana Busconi, Ph.D.
Abstract: This assignment is modeled after the work done in Wailoo and Pemberton, "The Troubled Dream of Genetic Medicine" (2006). It involves students choosing/identifying a disease or condition, researching the science behind a treatment and exploring the cultural identity associated with this disease or condition. Students write and submit a paper and create a poster for a poster session that happens in lab at the end of the semester. The poster session is designed to emulate a biomedical conference.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/sample-paper-poster-assignment-history-of-a-treatm.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the assignment on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanititesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click on the tab: "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Audience: Undergraduate


Three Sample Learning Modules from "History of Science"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Three Sample Learning Modules from "History of Science"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Abstract: The project's permanent website hosts three sample learning modules from "History of Science." These modules are (1) Early Modern "Big Science" & Spanish Empire Mapmaking; (2) 17th Century Cultures of Experimentation: Galileo vs. Boyle; and (3) The Race to Discover DNA's Structure. The website provides a narrative description of how lecture and lab are integrated, a lab manual, lecture materials and activities, as well as bibliographies for each module. We intend these to be open educational resources (OERs) for the teachers and students at other institutions to use.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.dean.edu/academics/innovation-in-teaching/national-endowment-for-the-humanities-grant/humanities-grant/
Primary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab: "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Three Sample Learning Modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Three Sample Learning Modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Abstract: The project's permanent website hosts three sample learning modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks." These modules are (1) Human Classification in the Enlightenment; (2) Race, Slavery, and Spirometry; and (3) Henrietta Lacks, HeLa Cells, and Bioethics. The website provides a narrative description of how lecture and lab are integrated, a lab manual, lecture materials and activities, as well as bibliographies for each module. We intend these to be open educational resources (OERs) for the teachers and students at other institutions to use.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Primary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab: "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks."
Audience: Undergraduate


First-Year Experience Curricular Materials
Grant details: AE-264001-19
Title: First-Year Experience Curricular Materials
Author: Lori Coggins
Author: Deanna Cooper
Abstract: The materials, located among supplementary materials, include four lessons associated with the common book Redeployment.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Teaching Frago to Developmental Reading Students
Grant details: AE-264001-19
Title: Teaching Frago to Developmental Reading Students
Author: Vickie Robison
Abstract: These materials discuss how to incorporate Phil Klay's short story with a developmental reading classroom. The materials are within the supplementary materials.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Jason Hale: Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Grant details: AE-264030-19
Title: Jason Hale: Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Author: Jason Hale
Abstract: A presentation on the contemporary Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation of Kansas.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://canvas.jccc.edu/courses/29658/files?preview=3228068
Audience: Other


Sean M. Daley: Contemporary American Indians 101
Grant details: AE-264030-19
Title: Sean M. Daley: Contemporary American Indians 101
Author: Sean M. Daley
Abstract: A presentation on the basics of contemporary American Indians, including demography, cultural and social issues, political status, and economic concerns.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://canvas.jccc.edu/courses/29658/files/3183103?module_item_id=734096
Audience: Other


ECE 212 Syllabus
Grant details: AE-269161-20
Title: ECE 212 Syllabus
Author: Antuanette Mester
Author: Dennette Derezotes
Author: Alejandra de la Pena
Author: Andrea Koepke
Author: Lorie Annarella
Abstract: Early Childhood Education 212: Art and Music for the Young Child syllabus
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://staugustine1edu.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/sites/AcademicEffectiveness/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7B6FD178F6-DB57-4B1E-A1F9-5751E63063FA%7D&file=ECE212%20Syllabus%20UPDATED%20with%20humanities%20content%20draft%201_10_2021.doc&action=default&mobile
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG 160 Syllabus
Grant details: AE-269161-20
Title: ENG 160 Syllabus
Author: Jennifer Talley
Author: Andrea Koepke
Author: Kathryn Webb
Author: Antuanette Mester
Abstract: ENG 160: English Composition I syllabus
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://staugustine1edu.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/sites/AcademicEffectiveness/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BC2AA1ED0-7869-4264-88C3-128ECF90A97B%7D&file=ENG%20160%20Syllabus%20edited.doc&action=default&mobileredirect=true
Audience: Undergraduate


ECE 212 Pre/Post Test
Grant details: AE-269161-20
Title: ECE 212 Pre/Post Test
Author: Dennette Derezotes
Abstract: The assessment used to measure gains in humanities knowledge
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/63DQLCV
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG 160 Pre/Post Test
Grant details: AE-269161-20
Title: ENG 160 Pre/Post Test
Author: Dennette Derezotes
Abstract: The assessment used to measure gains in humanities knowledge.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://staugustine1edu.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/sites/AcademicEffectiveness/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BC81FF8FE-666A-40BB-ACB2-226FC0D9E467%7D&file=ENGLISH%20160%20PRE%20AND%20POST%20TEST.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG 160 Standardized Writing Exam
Grant details: AE-269161-20
Title: ENG 160 Standardized Writing Exam
Author: Jennifer Talley
Author: Kathryn Webb
Abstract: The assessment used to measure gains in writing/composition proficiency
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://staugustine1edu.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/sites/AcademicEffectiveness/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?sourcedoc=%7BBA74D1F6-DF12-4565-85A9-942F13B0753C%7D&file=Standardized%20Pre%20and%20Post%20Test.docx&action=default&mobileredirect=true
Audience: Undergraduate


PHI 1623: Workplace Ethics/Syllabus & Course Design
Grant details: AE-269208-20
Title: PHI 1623: Workplace Ethics/Syllabus & Course Design
Author: James Nichols
Author: Ann Thebaut
Author: Eugenio Zaldivar
Abstract: PHI 1623 Workplace Ethics introduces students to current and historically relevant topics of cultural, societal and interpersonal values and ethics seen in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on core areas of ethical significance in the contemporary workplace. This includes, but is not limited to issues in information technology, personal data management, crisis ethics, human resources, workplace equity, community commitment, workplace safety, worker rights, and conflict resolution. Students will acquire the necessary moral reasoning skills to address in a thoughtful and effective way significant ethical dilemmas that arise in the workplace from managerial, worker, and other perspectives. This course is especially valuable for students seeking to enter the workplace, and so it is relevant to the interests of students in all degree and certificate programs.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-ejDNbusl33F_cdDzojCFvnv0k1p7Nk2/view?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


The Ethics Bowl "Toolkit"--SF's Guide to Ethics Bowl
Grant details: AE-269208-20
Title: The Ethics Bowl "Toolkit"--SF's Guide to Ethics Bowl
Author: Lisa Charney
Author: Ann Thebaut
Author: Claire Orenduff
Author: Ronald Claypool
Abstract: The Ethics Bowl Toolkit is a compilation of resources meant to introduce students to ethics and Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl. Some of the resources were created by SF faculty members/Ethics Bowl team advisors, and some were taken from outside sources. SF's Ethics Bowl Toolkit resources are part of a Module that is housed in a Canvas course titled "Santa Fe Ethics Bowl Team."
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1dHBJpUlS3RInerwlNA5aVViGd_m2pIRW?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


History Instructional Materials and Support - Curricular Materials
Grant details: AH-275540-20
Title: History Instructional Materials and Support - Curricular Materials
Author: Wilfred M. McClay
Author: Theodor Rebarber
Author: Kathleen Madigan
Author: John McBride
Author: Patrick Allitt
Abstract: Course Overview The AAT Curriculum sees the proper study of American history as the centerpiece in the making of citizens, and the cultivation of an informed and reflective love of country. Because Americans are linked together not by blood and soil, but by the principles and history we share, it is essential that these things be passed down. This is one of the central tasks of education, and we cannot afford to fail in it. Instructional Units The Instructional Units for US History are built using evidenced based practices that require students to actively engage with primary and secondary sources. Teachers are provided thematic units that trace historical content chronologically aligned with the textbook Land of Hope by Wilfred McClay (2019). Each unit has a pacing guide (recommended number of days and time needed per lesson), an instructional sequence, plus a complete set of teacher materials with sample student materials. Teacher materials include: essential vocabulary words to help at risk readers access the text, selected original sources, close analytic and critical reading guidelines for text based materials, timeline activities with images, discussion guides for selected topics in each unit, note-taking strategies, and assignments designed to develop writing historical narrative and arguments.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.aateducation.org/mediafeed/search?ext=pdf&keyword=&type=application/pdf&folder=
Primary URL Description: Course materials
Audience: K - 12


Info Lit 1/Learning Foundations Modules
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Info Lit 1/Learning Foundations Modules
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: The six Learning Foundations modules cover foundational concepts in information literacy, including library orientation; developing a topic; understanding source types; searching a database; evaluating sources; and citing sources.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://guides.csbsju.edu/general-research
Primary URL Description: Our “General Library Research Tutorial” makes the content of these Canvas modules, minus the module quizzes, publicly available: https://guides.csbsju.edu/general-research. The modules will also be made accessible and available for reuse in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Data Ethics Modules
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Data Ethics Modules
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: These three complementary modules engage students in issues surrounding confirmation bias, data bias and racism, and data accuracy.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/ddedc4a965ed4185a83863c84e71c8e7?shared;
Primary URL Description: The modules are available in Canvas Commons: Confirmation Bias; Data Bias and Racism; and Data Accuracy.
Secondary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/ed722e0b65d444979b0791f86b2c35f3?shared
Audience: Undergraduate


Authority and Bias
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Authority and Bias
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module introduces the concepts of explicit, implicit, and confirmation bias; helps students understand their own implicit biases through the Harvard Project Implicit Bias assessment; and encourages reflection on how implicit bias might impact the work of an author/researcher/creator.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/39f85d71b810475ba16a020696ad7ac7?shared
Primary URL Description: The Authority & Bias module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Searching for Hispanic Language Resources (HISP 358)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Searching for Hispanic Language Resources (HISP 358)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module guides students through search strategies for finding Spanish-language resources and introduces indexes, databases, bibliographies, newspaper collections, and other online sources for student research.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/37dbbb0a80484d45aeeef62631331567?shared
Primary URL Description: The Searching for Hispanic Language Resources (HISP 358) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Finding and Using Images (HISP 358)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Finding and Using Images (HISP 358)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module helps students apply US copyright laws and Creative Commons licenses to image usage; search for images online using ethical guidelines; perform a reverse image search; and navigate the Artstor image repository.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/cfa6c91aa67c4eb782c261f85781abe8?shared
Primary URL Description: The Finding and Using Images (HISP 358) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Citing Images (HISP 358)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Citing Images (HISP 358)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module teaches students to identify the bibliographic elements essential for properly citing images, including artwork and other online images.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/f70a2911f16a47e2834c6a49ced700e7?shared
Primary URL Description: The Citing Images (HISP 358) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Visual Literacy
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Visual Literacy
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module walks students through the difference between shallow and deep images and helps them apply the DIG method (developing skill sets to analyze, interpret, evaluate, and comprehend) deep images.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/27ccc1763a854949b3df3b2e74580de7?shared
Primary URL Description: The Visual Literacy (HISP 358) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Music & Hybridity (HISP 358)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Music & Hybridity (HISP 358)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module helps students understand the early religious impact on music from Latin America and Spain and the hybridization of music from Latin America and Spain; find music resources; and accurately cite music in MLA citation style.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/abf34955f9fe4489a7bd4d6989609b28?shared
Primary URL Description: The Music & Hybridity module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Popular Science Writing (ENVR 315)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Popular Science Writing (ENVR 315)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module guides students through choosing appropriate sources; evaluating the credibility and authority of web sources; and locating scholarly sources from the humanities and other disciplines.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/ae2d4ae39f2542deb1e3efa008b6fbd2?shared
Primary URL Description: The Popular Science Writing (ENVR 315) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Economic & Immigration Data
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Global Economic & Immigration Data
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module supports student research using economic data and data on immigration and introduces students to relevant databases and online resources.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/2f6be83bd43c457da4ddf65147ffa243?shared
Primary URL Description: The Global Economic & Immigration Data module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Islam in Minnesota
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Islam in Minnesota
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module provides an overview regarding the demographics of Minnesota’s Muslim communities; the challenges and opportunities faced by Muslims in Minnesota; and outlines how the Islamic experience in Minnesota is different from and similar to Islamic experiences in the United States more broadly.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/2ddfa9a60a364e60901d9f6b58468f44?shared
Primary URL Description: The Islam in Minnesota module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Information Literacy in Theological Research (THEO 323)
Grant details: AH-275795-20
Title: Information Literacy in Theological Research (THEO 323)
Author: CSB/SJU Libraries
Abstract: This module uses the specific example of Christianity in relationship to Judaism to help students learn how to evaluate sources, gain familiarity and expertise in searching databases for credible articles and books, and then apply this to find specific sources on a topic, as well as to see the scholarly conversation in action and understand how they can participate in this conversation.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://lor.instructure.com/resources/57adc65197284f94bdec95d1ed6229d0?shared
Primary URL Description: The Information Literacy in Theological Research (THEO 323) module is available in Canvas Commons.
Audience: Undergraduate


Sustainability Certificate Proposal
Grant details: AK-255344-17
Title: Sustainability Certificate Proposal
Author: Christoffer Lammer-Heindel
Author: Benjamin Darr
Abstract: Proposal to establish the Sustainability Certificate credential and course identification. Submitted to Loras College's Academic Council in November 2017.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://buildingecoliteracy.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/ac-certificate-proposal.pdf
Primary URL Description: PDF of Academic Council Proposal
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP121: Communicating Globally and Locally
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP121: Communicating Globally and Locally
Author: Jessica Despain
Abstract: a syllabus for the entry-level, skills-based course in the Digital Community Engagement Pathway. The course emphasizes multi-modal writing, systems thinking, and problem mapping.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to the sample syllabi created during the grant period.
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP123: Research and Systems Thinking
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP123: Research and Systems Thinking
Author: Jen Cline
Abstract: A sample syllabus for the second-semester required research methods courses for the Digital Community Engagement Pathway.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to the sample syllabi on the Digital Community Engagement Pathway website.
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP221: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Scientific Method
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP221: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Scientific Method
Author: Michael Hankins
Abstract: A sample syllabus for the third-semester core skills-based corse in the Digital Community Engagement Pathway emphasizing interdisciplinary approaches to the scientific method.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to sample syllabi on the Digital Community Engagement Pathway website.
Audience: Undergraduate


Course syllabus
Grant details: AKA-260488-18
Title: Course syllabus
Author: Ju Shen, Ph.D.
Abstract: Document is a course syllabus for an advanced computer science course (Interactive Media) that integrates humanities contents and methods of inquiry. Course was revised in connection with this NEH planning grant.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Envs 350/Eng 302- Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Grant details: AKA-260489-18
Title: Envs 350/Eng 302- Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Author: Patrick Hurley
Author: Jon Volkmer
Abstract: In addition to regular in-class work, this course includes experiential or outdoor components built into the class, a series of associated methods assignments, and one, weekend stewardship activitiy. Our outdoor activities and stewardship will offer you the opportunity to engage with different scientific, social scientific, and humanities forms of engagement with the landscapes, ecosystems, and species that characterize southeastern Pennsylvania’s Anthropocene “mixed settlements,” while providing you the opportunity to match the theory of our readings with the practice of studying these complex places. In short, these are the moments and places where you will have the chance to “ground-truth” our understandings of the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will ask you to engage in original data collection of diverse kinds and interpretive analysis. By the end of the semester, we will ask you to develop your own narrative of what the Anthropocene is and what it means to people living in our region.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Envs 350/Engl 302, Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Grant details: AKA-260489-18
Title: Envs 350/Engl 302, Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Author: Patrick Hurley
Author: Jon Volkmer
Abstract: In addition to regular in-class work, this course includes experiential or outdoor components built into the class, a series of associated methods assignments, and one, weekend stewardship activitiy. Our outdoor activities and stewardship will offer you the opportunity to engage with different scientific, social scientific, and humanities forms of engagement with the landscapes, ecosystems, and species that characterize southeastern Pennsylvania’s Anthropocene “mixed settlements,” while providing you the opportunity to match the theory of our readings with the practice of studying these complex places. In short, these are the moments and places where you will have the chance to “ground-truth” our understandings of the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will ask you to engage in original data collection of diverse kinds and interpretive analysis. By the end of the semester, we will ask you to develop your own narrative of what the Anthropocene is and what it means to people living in our region
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kERnsy9ra6KxPeySFABn1ocXzeA0W3Yhx2TQ6dqaYTQ/edit
Primary URL Description: Google Drive link to Envs 350/Engl 302 Syllabus
Audience: Undergraduate


Introduction to Digital Humanities
Grant details: AKA-260563-18
Title: Introduction to Digital Humanities
Author: Kim Vaz-Deville
Abstract: This course introduces students to the field of digital humanities. Through course activities, students will gain awareness of how the tools, technologies and methods are used in both academia and the business world. Ultimately, students will become critical and reflective users of a range of digital tools, technologies and methods used by business, industry and academia to explore issues and solve problems by understanding that all technologies are complex, socially situated, and political. The course will consist of a combination of lecture, guest speakers, lab (1.5 hours classroom; 1.5 hours of lab). (3)
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://catalog.xula.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=37&poid=8769
Audience: Undergraduate


Ethics at the End of Life
Grant details: AKA-260563-18
Title: Ethics at the End of Life
Author: James Dunson
Abstract: In this course, students will be asked to consider their own research interests in light of the goals and values of patients. End-of-life issues accomplish this task uniquely, because our ability to manage symptoms has far outpaced our ability to cure disease. How should we regard the wishes of patients who are chronically sick, slowly losing cognitive function, or even terminally ill? If the confrontation with one’s own mortality is, to a large degree, a personal issue, then how should we understand patient pain and suffering? While it is true that end-of life issues raise significant questions about the purpose and limits of scientific research, they also introduce equally important questions about what we can claim ethically about someone else’s confrontation with mortality. For this reason, students will be challenged to move beyond both dogmatic scientific claims and abstract ethical arguments. They will also be tasked with learning some digital tools (e.g. Wordpress, Omeka, or Tableau) that they can use to present and publish their semester-long research projects in a database of student work on Bioethics. This includes becoming proficient in the ethics of digital publishing and in strategies for developing a scholarly portfolio. (3)
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://catalog.xula.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=37&poid=8769
Audience: Undergraduate


Explorations in Data Science for Humanities
Grant details: AKA-260563-18
Title: Explorations in Data Science for Humanities
Author: Nawa Raj Porhkl
Abstract: This application focused course will present basic data organization, data cleaning, data management, visualization and statistical modeling in digital humanities. This course lies at the intersection of fundamental programming skills, data visualization, data cleaning and statistical modeling in R and Excel environment. Furthermore, data cleaning is exercised using Excel and rest of the components of the course are handled on R platform. Students will identify appropriate statistical methods for the data or problems and conduct their own analysis using real datasets. This is a hands-on, project-based course to enable students to develop skills and to solve interdisciplinary problems.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://catalog.xula.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=37&poid=8769
Audience: Undergraduate


Manuscript Studies
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Manuscript Studies
Author: Anna Siebach Larsen
Abstract: This course explores books and documents before print, exploring them as material objects within their historical and social contexts. We will ask questions about who made books and other documents, how they were designed, who used them, and how they were used. These lines of inquiry (producer, design, user, and function) are closely intertwined: understanding the purpose of a book or document can help us decode its design and even the words on a page – and vice versa. This course will cover all aspects of manuscript production, dissemination, readership and reception, and ownership. The focus will be on Latinate manuscripts of Western Europe, but we will give you the tools to approach manuscripts across a range of cultures and languages. While exploring the context of medieval manuscripts, the course will provide a practical grounding in the terms and practices of manuscript description and transcription, covering paleography (the history of scripts), codicology (the study of the material and physical history of the book), decoration, and diplomatics (the study of official documents).
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Digital History: Historical Worlds, Virtual Worlds, Virtual Museums
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Digital History: Historical Worlds, Virtual Worlds, Virtual Museums
Author: Michael Jarvis
Abstract: This course introduces students to some of the techniques of digital history using the Virtual St. George's Project, Digital Elmina Project or historical digital simulations of your own design to practically apply technology to humanistic research and public education.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Historical Document Imaging and Processing
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Historical Document Imaging and Processing
Author: Roger Easton
Abstract: This course will introduce undergraduate students to the primary imaging technologies used to discover new information about cultural heritage. Specifically, multispectral imaging and image processing will be considered in a practical way where students will complete projects to gain hands-on experience in spectral image capture, calibration and processing.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


The Hidden Canon: A History of the Search for Lost Texts, 1345-2020
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: The Hidden Canon: A History of the Search for Lost Texts, 1345-2020
Author: Gregory Heyworth
Abstract: This course is not a history of the book. It does not follow the epic parade of culture from alphabet to quill, printing press to keyboard. The story we tell here is in the elegiac mode: how cultures failed and their artifacts disappeared, how fabled texts and records were lost and forgotten, and how, with effort and ingenuity, a paltry few were clawed back from oblivion. From Europe to the Middle East, Asia to Latin America, an unsung group of scholars, adventurers, scientists, and rogues trekked across deserts and over mountains, plundered tombs and monasteries, rummaged between the legs of mummies, entered hidden caves and bricked up rooms, deciphered lost languages, and developed new technologies all so as to recover for the world a group of texts that would change the history of the past. That is if anyone actually bothered to read them. Here is the history of the hidden canon, great yet little-known books drawn from far-flung collections: Monte Cassino, Verona, Herculaneum, the Fayum, Dura Europos, Ras Sharma, St. Catherine's Monastery in the Sinai, the Cairo Genizah, the Qumran caves, Khotan, Dun Huang, Chichen Itza, and Guatemala City. Its cast of characters includes the famous, the flamboyant, and the obscure: Petrarch, Poggio, Flinders Petrie, Grenville and Hunt, Solomon Schechter, Marcus Aurelius Stein, Zelia Nutall, Brasseur, Alexander von Humboldt, Konstantin Tischendorf, the Smith sisters. Because the territory this course covers is large, the format will be lecture and exam. In a companion course, Reading the Hidden Canon, students will consult excerpts from the most important documents and pieces of literature these scholars recovered, many still largely unknown.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Digital Imaging: 2d, 3D
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Digital Imaging: 2d, 3D
Author: Gregory Heyworth
Abstract: This course introduces students to the methods involved in turning real objects into virtual ones using cutting edge digital imaging technology and image rendering techniques. Focusing on manuscripts, paintings, maps, and 3D artifacts, students will learn the basics of Multispectral Imaging, Reflectance Transformation Imaging, 3D imaging, spectral image processing using ENVI, stitching in 2D and 3D, and photogrammetry. These skills will be applied to data from the ongoing research of the Lazarus Project as well as to local cultural heritage collections.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Image Text and Technology
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Image Text and Technology
Author: Gregory Heyworth
Abstract: Image, Text and Technology is an interdisciplinary course in the history of the book as a textual and visual medium, an artistic object, and a technology of communication. Beginning with Aristotle’s insight that we think in images, we will consider writing as bound up in a theoretical relationship with seeing (aesthetics), perceiving (phenomenology), and historically with technologies of dissemination, both analog and digital (manuscripts, printing, photography, television, the internet). We will explore the limits and conjunctions of visual and verbal media through theoretical and scientific readings in Plato, Lessing, Benjamin, Derrida, and McLuhan, and primary texts including the Bible, and the Precepts of Ptah Hotep..
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Between the Lines: Nature, Space, and Time in Italian Illuminated Manuscripts of Dante, Boccaccio and Petrarch
Grant details: AKA-265594-19
Title: Between the Lines: Nature, Space, and Time in Italian Illuminated Manuscripts of Dante, Boccaccio and Petrarch
Author: Gregory Heyworth and Alessandra Baroni
Abstract: Bringing together textual and artistic traditions at the inception of the Italian Renaissance, this course will examine closely key illuminated Italian manuscripts of the 14th century – The Thompson Divine Comedy in the British Library, Petrarch’s Vergil in the Ambrosiana Library of Milan, the holograph copy of Petrarch’s Rime Sparse (Vatican 3195), and Boccaccio’s Dante in the Riccardiana Library of Florence (Ms. 1035) – as the cornerstones of Italian high culture. Our focus will be on the way these manuscripts, and the authors and artists who created them, construct notions of aesthetic space and narrative time. Supplementing primary readings in Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, will be secondary theoretical readings by Cennini, Vasari, Alberti, Lessing, and Camille. Beyond literature and art, this course will also consider the problems of conservation of medieval manuscripts and early books, and their availability for a larger audience with the employment of digital technologies. The broad objective of the course is to give students a material appreciation and interdisciplinary knowledge of the sources of Italian medieval and Renaissance culture and their relevance for Humanities and Science.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


CSBSJU Honors Program Redesign Proposal August 2019
Grant details: AKA-265629-19
Title: CSBSJU Honors Program Redesign Proposal August 2019
Author: Emily Esch
Author: Elisabeth Wengler
Abstract: This proposal for the redesign of our Honors Program was a main goal of our project. It was submitted to our Academic Curriculum Committee and received approval in October 2019. The proposal describes the rationale for the redesign and describes the features and curriculum of the new program in detail.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Islam Freshmen Cluster syllabi
Grant details: AKA-265761-19
Title: Global Islam Freshmen Cluster syllabi
Author: Asma Sayeed, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Author: Christine Chism, Ph.D., UCLA Department of English
Author: Jeffrey Guhin, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Sociology
Author: Susan Slyomovics, Ph.D., UCLA Depts. of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Abstract: Islam is an immensely diverse global tradition, the second largest religion. The course sequence offers a study of Islam and Muslims within a framework of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across the world. Students exam Islam's evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity--when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia--to modern era where it is practice from US to Indonesia. The sequence concentrates on broad analytical categories in the study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history and case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Islam Freshmen Cluster
Grant details: AKA-265761-19
Title: Global Islam Freshmen Cluster
Author: Asma Sayeed, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Author: Christine Chism, Ph.D., UCLA Department of English
Author: Jeffrey Guhin, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Sociology
Author: Susan Slyomovics, Ph.D., UCLA Depts. of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Abstract: Islam is an immensely diverse global tradition, the second largest religion. The course sequence offers a study of Islam and Muslims within a framework of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across the world. Students exam Islam's evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity--when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia--to modern era where it is practice from US to Indonesia. The sequence concentrates on broad analytical categories in the study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history and case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://ucla.in/3fQRyPi
Audience: Undergraduate


Pathways Descriptions Written in Response to NEH Planning Grant June 1 2020 – May 30 2021
Grant details: AKA-270126-20
Title: Pathways Descriptions Written in Response to NEH Planning Grant June 1 2020 – May 30 2021
Author: Elizabeth McDermott
Author: Daniel Hauser
Author: Debra Workman
Author: Anna Ioanes
Abstract: This is the pathways proposal completed in response to the planning grant. It defines and summarizes the four pathways: Compassion for the Earth; Respect and American Culture and Identity; Integrity in a Digital World; Finding Meaning through Service.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://https://docs.google.com/document/d/1h1ARyi8YCczK6h_FcgLVHCCwYEAbkHEi/edit
Audience: Undergraduate


REACH Case study: "When to Vaccinate, When to Educate?"
Grant details: AKA-270131-20
Title: REACH Case study: "When to Vaccinate, When to Educate?"
Author: Timothy Stock
Author: Michéle Schlehofer
Abstract: The following case represents ethical issues identified by the Community Ethics Network of the Salisbury University REACH initiative. The facts of the case are generalized and stipulated in such a way that the case represents a real-world ethics conflict at the same time that it does not disclose confidential information. The purpose of this case is for use in coursework and community discussions around vaccination and public health.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


REACH Case Study: "Climate Change Book Club"
Grant details: AKA-270131-20
Title: REACH Case Study: "Climate Change Book Club"
Author: Timothy Stock
Author: Michéle Schlehofer
Abstract: The following case represents ethical issues identified by the Community Ethics Network of the Salisbury University REACH initiative. The facts of the case are generalized and stipulated in such a way that the case represents a real-world ethics conflict at the same time that it does not disclose confidential information. The purpose of this case is for use in coursework and community discussions around the role of advocacy in science.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Digital Public History at UConn
Grant details: AKA-270132-20
Title: Digital Public History at UConn
Author: Tom Scheinfeldt
Author: Fiona Vernal
Author: Wes Hamrick
Author: Clarissa Ceglio
Author: Heather Elliott-Famularo
Author: Mark Healey
Abstract: Plan of study for the UConn Digital Public History minor
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://draft.digitalpublichistory.programs.uconn.edu/course-requirements/
Audience: Undergraduate


New Course IDIS 200: Health Humanities
Grant details: AKA-270135-20
Title: New Course IDIS 200: Health Humanities
Author: Louisa Rice
Abstract: This page includes information about the the core course in the certificate program: IDIS 200: Health Humanities.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://https://catalog.uwec.edu/courses/idis/
Primary URL Description: Course catalog page including IDIS 200
Audience: Undergraduate


Preliminary Proposal for Environmental Ethics Minor
Grant details: AKA-270153-20
Title: Preliminary Proposal for Environmental Ethics Minor
Author: Ryan Patrick McLaughlin
Abstract: This proposal expressed the rationale for the minor. It also outlines the mission, goals, student learning outcomes, and course content of the program.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Culture, Technology, and the Futures of Health and Healthcare
Grant details: AKA-270156-20
Title: Culture, Technology, and the Futures of Health and Healthcare
Author: Sari Altschuler
Author: Christopher Parsons
Author: John Basl
Author: Matthew Goodwin
Author: Laura Senier
Author: Sara Jensen Carr
Abstract: Course description: This course introduces the challenges posed by the data-heavy medicine of the future to privacy, the appropriate collection of medical data, and the ways that patients and healthcare workers alike think about health. Students will learn how to use critical and ethical theories, analyze health narratives, and use historical and contemporary data about health disparities to forecast how new technologies might pose social and cultural challenges. The course takes a humanities perspective to critically evaluate social and cultural aspects of a healthcare system shaped by emerging technologies and the data they produce.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Art, Money, Power Course Materials
Grant details: AKA-270241-20
Title: Art, Money, Power Course Materials
Author: Sarah Parrish
Author: Ron Porter
Abstract: Syllabus and assignments for Art, Money, Power course offered at Plymouth State University in Spring 2021.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://sarahdparrish.squarespace.com/art-money-power
Primary URL Description: Link on Applied Visual Literacy project website containing syllabus and assignments for Art, Money, Power course offered at Plymouth State University in Spring 2021.
Audience: Undergraduate


Bodies of Art Course Materials
Grant details: AKA-270241-20
Title: Bodies of Art Course Materials
Author: John Christ
Author: Suzanne Gaulocher
Abstract: Learning outcomes and course modules for Bodies of Art course (not yet offered to students).
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://sarahdparrish.squarespace.com/new-page-5
Primary URL Description: Applied Visual Literacy website page for materials related to Bodies of Art course development.
Audience: Undergraduate


CRJ 211 Law Enforcement
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: CRJ 211 Law Enforcement
Author: Kim Carr
Abstract: This course will chronicle the history, development, philosophy and current status of law enforcement. Topics will include an examination of law enforcement agencies, identifying most important characteristics of city, state, and federal police work. Analysis of police problems, and the processes of justice and constitutional limitations on law enforcement will also be discussed in the course. Further, when this course is part of a learning community , experiential learning activities will apply recognized ethical principles to ethical dilemmas in law enforcement.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Author: Tim McCorry
Abstract: This course is designed to develop a heightened awareness and sensitivity to the social and ethical issues that arise when policing in a multicultural society. Specifically, the course will examine the history and development of municipal policing. It will also review the philosophical and theoretical perspectives of community and problem-oriented approaches addressing the legal and ethical issues associated with applying these models in a real-world, multicultural context.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Author: Jerry Erion
Abstract: This course highlights the vital role of moral philosophy in exploring deep ethical questions in criminal justice. What is the right thing to do? And what are the elements of good character? In the spirit of applied philosophy, the course will engage these types of questions while also introducing significant connections to important criminal justice issues. Topics include logic and critical thinking concepts that are central to the philosophical method as well as ethical theories that can ground the composition and evaluation of a wide range of ethical arguments.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Syllabus: PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Author: Jerry Erion
Abstract: This course highlights the vital role of moral philosophy in exploring deep ethical questions in criminal justice. What is the right thing to do? And what are the elements of good character? In the spirit of applied philosophy, the course will engage these types of questions while also introducing significant connections to important criminal justice issues. Topics include logic and critical thinking concepts that are central to the philosophical method as well as ethical theories that can ground the composition and evaluation of a wide range of ethical arguments.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: CRJ 211: Law Enforcement
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Syllabus: CRJ 211: Law Enforcement
Author: Kim Carr
Abstract: This course will chronicle the history, development, philosophy and current status of law enforcement. Topics will include an examination of law enforcement agencies, identifying most important characteristics of city, state, and federal police work. Analysis of police problems, and the processes of justice and constitutional limitations on law enforcement will also be discussed in the course.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Author: Tim McCorry
Abstract: This course is designed to develop a heightened awareness and sensitivity to the social and ethical issues that arise when policing in a multicultural society. Specifically, the course will examine the history and development of municipal policing. It will also review the philosophical and theoretical perspectives of community and problem-oriented approaches addressing the legal and ethical issues associated with applying these models in a real-world, multicultural context.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Project Brief
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Project Brief
Author: Kim Carr and Jerry Erion
Abstract: The final project for the CRJ 211-PHI 310 learning community was to create and share — in speech and writing — an argument on some issue in professional ethics.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Ethical Reasoning Rubric
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Ethical Reasoning Rubric
Author: Jerry Erion
Abstract: Rubric for assessing ethical reasoning. It focuses on the ability of students to identify ethical concepts, apply ethical concepts, and evaluate ethical arguments.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Case Report
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Case Report
Author: Kim Carr
Author: Jerry Erion
Abstract: The final project for the CRJ 211-PHI 310 learning community was to create and share — in speech and writing — an argument on some issue in professional ethics
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Fall 2019 Materials Matter Syllabus and Labs
Grant details: AKB-260492-18
Title: Fall 2019 Materials Matter Syllabus and Labs
Author: Collaboratively authored by the Materials Matter team
Abstract: Materials Matter Fall 2019 syllabus with revised lab reports appended.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Z6fxYd5Naetx4EhcSKRiwB7Yfrrlbln0/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: The URL is a link to a shared Google Drive file. The pdf has also been uploaded.
Audience: Undergraduate


Art in New York: Art, Spectacle, and Labor
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Art in New York: Art, Spectacle, and Labor
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: In conjunction with my research project, Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students under progress from 2018 to 2021, I would like all of you to consider the intersection of art, spectacle, and labor as a theme of Art in New York in the spring of 2019. Art and labor became more prominent in the nineteenth century as rural society rapidly transformed into urban culture. Scenes of rural laborers such as farmers, fishermen, or workers were often received as nostalgic views of by-gone eras. Artists such as Impressionists in nineteenth-century Paris discovered images of urban workers such as shop keepers, street vendors, or railroad workers. At the same time, the genre of spectacle was being invented in industrial machines, steel and glass buildings, or newly renovated urban boulevards. In this class, we will visit a diverse range of special exhibitions held in New York City or elsewhere and think about how art (or artists) is intertwined with the creation of spectacles or spectacular new experiences at the expense of hard labor, visible or invisible.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


History of Business in the Visual Arts: 1800-2000
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: History of Business in the Visual Arts: 1800-2000
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: This course explores the intersection of art and labor from the perspective of how the production of visual arts has evolved with economic development and business management. Students learn about critical issues that surround the making of art and the status of artists and designers in the context of modern and contemporary labor and business. The course enables students to understand that historical events or philosophical ideologies impact the livelihood of artists and designers. Students also learn about effects of political upheaval, war, migration, and exile on works and career choices of artists and designers. Changes to the terms of employment and labor conditions have resulted from incidents including, but not limited to, looms driven by steam; the invention of readymade paint in tubes; contemporary issues of copyright and originality; the mining labor behind the use of precious materials in art; and the exposure to poisons and pollution in the manufacture of certain luxury products. Topics and case studies are open to thematic and theoretical approaches as new modes of employment emerge in the present time. Historical precedents of the collaborative aspects of art, architecture, design, or crafts, as well as interdisciplinary collaborations with creators and practitioners outside visual arts are also introduced within the course’s own framework of art and labor.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Historical Avatars and role playing
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Historical Avatars and role playing
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: Reading city directories and census pages at the beginning of a semester, students will take a real person who worked at the occupation they are studying and build a character based on those records and other primary and secondary sources we provide. In class, or off-line, the student will play this character as she or he faces crises and conundrums of the eras. When the record is silent on these specific people (their values, aspects of their identity, the kind of firm they work for, etc.), students will fill in the blanks with their imagination, guided by readings about the era. This will become an avatar or virtual character for the student. Students can be allowed to play their ancestors. Some faculty may want to impose balances of class, race, gender, occupation, etc. Very few students should be allowed to play famous people.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Experiential Learning Projects: Shadowing Professionals
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Experiential Learning Projects: Shadowing Professionals
Author: Vincent Quan
Abstract: By shadowing a professional or interviewing a recent retiree of a specific field of industry, students can develop a sense of community as well as learn about realities of working-class employees in New York City. Instructors can create an assignment pertinent to this and provide a historical context. Many students are already working or participating in internships in their chosen professional training. Historicizing their industry or positions with someone’s life experience and personal stories will enable students to perceive their career path with more dignity and socio-economic contexts.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Show Girls and Cameramen: Entertainment Workers in New York City
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Show Girls and Cameramen: Entertainment Workers in New York City
Author: Ron Amato
Abstract: Area: Entertainment/Marketing Pair: Ron Amato (Photography, FIT) and Michelle Handelman (Film and Media, FIT) Art: Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, David Salle, Kehinde Wiley Film and television clips: Singin’ in the Rain (Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, 1952); The Producers (Mel Brooks, 1967); High Art (Lisa Cholodenko, 1998); The Times of Bill Cunningham (Mark Bozek, 2010) Clips will focus on issues of gender and social class among various professions within the entertainment industry. Workers’ rights and fair contracts will receive much emphasis in the evolution of the entertainment industry post WWII. Ethnic diversity and gender identity will also be addressed, in light of marginalized sectors of industry such as strippers, exotic dancers, transgender performers, and burlesque actors. Photographers, costume designers, cinematographers, or scenic artists are indispensable in the narrative of the entertainment business and teaching business and labor aspects of the industry. FIT professors are film producers, directors and playwrights. They can collaborate with professors at CUNY colleges teaching the entertainment technologies of sound, lighting, scenery, video and show control.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Interethnic Relations in the Workplace
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Interethnic Relations in the Workplace
Author: Vincent Quan
Abstract: Area: Fashion Business Management and Advertising and Marketing Communication Pair: Vincent Quan (FBM) and Rebecca Bauman (Modern Languages and Cultures, FIT) Art: Edward Hopper, Archibald Motley, Adrian Piper Film and television clips: Here students confront narratives of racial justice in the workplace through the comparison of interethnic conflict in both blue collar and white-collar environments, looking specifically at the representations of interactions between African Americans and Italian Americans in the context of labor. We look at fictional representations in cinema such as Matewan (Sayles, 1987), Do The Right Thing (Lee, 1980), and The Green Book (Farrelly, 2018) while contextualizing them in the historical background of immigration, segregation, and integration as they pertain to these two groups. Students will then create theatrical projects in which they imagine different modes of interaction based on racial and ethnic identity in a variety of different workplace contexts.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Cultural Expectations of Hospitality
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Cultural Expectations of Hospitality
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: Area: Hospitality and Communication Design Pair: Daniel Levinson Wilk (History, FIT) and Patrice George (Textile Development and Marketing, FIT) Songs: “Pennsylvania 6-5000,” “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Hotel California” Art: service work in Jacob Lawrence and Edward Hopper Film and television clips: Grand Hotel (1932), Week-End at the Waldorf (1945), Home Alone (1990), The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), Maid in Manhattan (2002), Hotel Rwanda (2004), Grand Hotel (2019), student choices Discussion will examine how popular culture has portrayed hotel hospitality over the last hundred years, to what extent students and industry professionals think it shapes consumer desire and demand, and how one would research or measure the effect. Are hotel workers and especially management figures portrayed as servile or confident? How much of the actual workflow is depicted, and if it is not realistic, how might it warp viewers’ experiences in real hotels? After reviewing selections of popular art provided by the professors, students will find their own clips to show and comment on to the class.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Shop Girls: Retail Workers in New York City
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Shop Girls: Retail Workers in New York City
Author: Su Ku
Author: Eileen Karp
Abstract: Film and television clips: The Shop Around the Corner (Ernst Lubitsch, 1940); Le amiche/The Girlfriends (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1955); Hester Street (Joan Micklin Silver, 1975); Nine to Five (Colin Higgins, 1980); El tiempo entre costuras/The Time in Between (TV series, 2013-2014) Clips will focus on issues of gender in the workplace, with attention to general issues pertaining to both retail and corporate environments, and specific case studies of the fashion industry. Some sample activities the students may participate in: a) identify the career trajectory of the male versus female protagonists in their sales positions. What do you expect will happens in terms of job security, opportunities for promotion, wage increases, co-worker and customer relations? b) using the fashions created by the designers in the films/TV series, create two separate business models,: one that you would believe would be successful in the time period in which the show/film is based, and one for today. Present these business strategies to the class. What are the similarities/differences between these models and how are they influenced by historical, economic, and cultural factors? c) list the innovations the female protagonists introduce in their office. In small groups, create a proposal for further changes that specifically address the issues raised in the film. How do they address issues of sexual harassment, gender parity, work-family balance, flexibility, and overall improvement to the physical work environment? Pay special attention to issues such as race, class, and physical disability.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Virtual Exhibition: Picturing Labor in Art and Design Industry
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Virtual Exhibition: Picturing Labor in Art and Design Industry
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Elizabeth Way
Abstract: Students will create an online multimedia exhibit documenting the history of labor in New York City in a chosen industry and how it has changed to this day. Students will advance their research skills using digital tools as well as local resources at the Research Library at the New York Public Library and the archives at institutions including the New-York Historical Society, the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, El Museo del Barrio, and the Museum of the City of New York.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Fashion History Illustrated
Grant details: AKB-260507-18
Title: Fashion History Illustrated
Author: Su Ku
Abstract: For my fashion history class (FF121), I added labor emphasis throughout the lessons. In particular, women as textile makers/weavers and formation of guilds in the Middle Ages in promoting particular quality control on fabrics. My lesson plans include (since our NEH sessions) the history of the cotton textile industry that fuels industrial revolution. The slavery of South that provided fiber to English factories and labor conditions of the new manufactuers.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


"The Urban Ocean" -- First Year Seminar
Grant details: AKB-260531-18
Title: "The Urban Ocean" -- First Year Seminar
Author: Kelly Luis
Abstract: This newly created first-year seminar is an interdisciplinary exploration of the Boston Harbor and its islands. "The Urban Ocean" will take full advantage of UMass-Boston’s location on the waterfront to introduce first-year students to socio-environmental factors shaping Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Islands. Students will reflect on their evolving relationship with water through archival research, scientific experiments, and roundtable discussions with UMB’s research groups, indigenous communities, and environmental organizations around Boston Harbor. The experience, knowledge, and community gained during this course will help students navigate the rest of their undergraduate education at UMass-Boston. With the Atlantic Ocean on UMass-Boston’s doorstep, this place-based course immerses students in the history, culture, and science of Boston Harbor and its Islands to understand the natural and anthropogenic factors shaping our waterfront. The impacts of anthropogenic development and climate change extend from the bustling city of Boston to the outer reaches of Boston Harbor Islands and the consequences of these impacts are shared across UMass-Boston’s neighboring communities (e.g. Quincy, Dorchester, and South and East Boston) and abiotic and biotic communities. Throughout the course, students will reflect on their own relationships with water and their surroundings and the role they want to play as stewards
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Ancient Artistic Practices (AD 350)
Grant details: AKB-265638-19
Title: Ancient Artistic Practices (AD 350)
Author: Mont Allen
Abstract: The grandeur of ancient objects is stunning. But there is so much more to them than just their beauty. Have you ever wondered how these astonishing things were created in the first place? Just consider, for example….. ➤ Greek clay vessels: How on earth did ancient Greeks construct pottery kilns capable of reaching 950º Celsius (1740º Fahrenheit)?! What did they burn for fuel? How were clay vessels thrown, glazed, and fired? ➤ The quarrying and transport of marble and other stones in the ancient world: How were these massive blocks weighing many tons (!) extracted from the ground, hauled over land, rafted up and down rivers, loaded onto ships, shipped hundreds of miles across the Mediterranean, and transported to workshops and construction sites? How were these logistics of transport socially and culturally embedded? What role did slavery and the military play? ➤ Tools: Ancient sculptors used pickaxes and marble saws, chisels and drills, abrasives and waxes. How did they even manage to carve marble — let alone granite (!) — without steel tools or modern power? What were the fundamental differences between Greek, Roman, and Egyptian approaches to the carving process? ➤ And what about Greek bronze statues? What about Roman mosaics, glass vessels, and wall paintings? How were these made? This course explores the materials, tools, techniques, and other physical components of Greco-Roman artistic practice, with an eye to the cultural values that Greeks and Romans attached to these physical components.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Ancient Technologies & the Greek Philosophers (PHIL 304B/470B)
Grant details: AKB-265638-19
Title: Ancient Technologies & the Greek Philosophers (PHIL 304B/470B)
Author: Robert Hahn
Abstract: How can we explain the origins of Greek philosophy? If we look at how the early philosophers thought and wrote, we find evidence of technologies and technical analogies to describe the origins of the world, the formation of the heavens, the fundamental structure out of which the cosmos is built. This evidence includes: orienting pyramids and temples to cardinal directions, measuring the height of pyramids by their shadows, measuring the distance of a ship at sea, ancient surveying and engineering techniques that led to geometry, making a map of the Earth, a seasonal sundial, a model of the cosmos, the invention of coinage, and even the production of industrial textiles. This course will uncover these ancient technologies and then apply them to the surviving evidence about the Greek philosophers to see what new insights we can discover about the how, when, where, what, and why of its beginnings. From this exploration, can students become more philosophical?
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Archaeo-Engineering (ENGR 305)
Grant details: AKB-265638-19
Title: Archaeo-Engineering (ENGR 305)
Author: Frances Harackiewicz
Abstract: Archaeologists have discovered marvelous inventions from the ancient world, long before engineering was considered to have been founded as a modern profession. How did ancient people measure time and location, travel, communicate, shelter, obtain food and water, or wage war? What propelled their inventiveness? Some canonical discoveries have much to teach in terms of humanities and history as well as science and engineering. Using modern tools, feats of ancient engineering will be studied and modeled digitally or physically. Important engineering projects or inventions of the past covered such as sun dials, Stonehenge, the Antikythera mechanism, Roman roads, siege machines and aqueducts.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (ANTH 340E/430E)
Grant details: AKB-265638-19
Title: Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (ANTH 340E/430E)
Author: Gretchen Dabbs
Abstract: What if I told you no one knew King Tut existed before his tomb was discovered and opened in 1922? Most people are aware of ancient Egypt in a very specific way, their knowledge guided by the fantastic and highly publicized discoveries of the last century of archaeological research: Pyramids! Mummies! Previously unknown tombs! Heart disease in the mummy of a lesser princess! However, the texts written inside temples and tombs of Egypt during the time of the Pharaohs were highly restricted and written by and for specific audiences. Only the elites and royals would have been able to read them. Only royals and elites would have even had a large-scale rock cut tomb to provide texts. Only about 1% of ancient Egyptians were literate. What then of the other 99%, those that would have largely driven the Egyptian economy as the productive manufacturers and farmers? This course focuses on understanding the broader scope of ancient Egypt beyond the monumental structures left behind by royals and elites to focus on the daily lives and lived experiences of the non-elite (those like you and me!) through analysis of archaeological remains of houses, non-elite burial grounds, and other records. The Pyramids, mummies, and statuary of ancient Egypt focus on what life was like among the highest elite. This course will use the archaeological site of Tell el-Amarna as the primary lens for discussions on the lives of the non-elites that would have comprised the bulk of the population. Amarna represents what remains of a single lens (15-20 year) occupation of an ancient capital city occupied by an estimated 50,000 individuals.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Wining & Dining in the Ancient World (HND/FERM 300)
Grant details: AKB-265638-19
Title: Wining & Dining in the Ancient World (HND/FERM 300)
Author: Matthew McCarroll
Author: Lynn Gill
Abstract: Ask any college student what they like to do in their spare time and most will mention either eating, drinking, or socializing. These activities, while enjoyable, actually have historical significance. Since the beginning of time, food and drink have been basic needs for every human being. However, the meaning behind these practices varied from culture to culture. For example, the ancient Greeks began their morning with barely bread dipped in wine. While this may be frowned upon in today’s culture, this combination was thought to have healing powers. Also, the focus of a meal was to spend time socializing and please the palate, not to fill the stomach. In today’s climate, the goal of eating changed to accommodate large portion sizes and busy schedules with less emphasis on the ancient philosophy of eating for wisdom, spirit, and nourishing the soul. This course will take you back in time to explore ancient dietary customs and symbolism, including how materials for food and drink were gathered, processed and prepared, and their influence on health. We will explore fermentation as a processing and preservation method and examine evidence of the impact of fermentation on the agricultural revolution and the dawn of civilization. Specifically, this course will focus on: Foods associated with different cultures in ancient times Symbolism behind common ancient foods Health status of ancient population compared to the health status of modern times How food and drink were gathered, processed and prepared Creating recipes from ancient food products Fermentation as a processing and preservation method and examine evidence of the impact of fermentation on the development of germ theory, human health, the agricultural revolution and arguably even the dawn of civilization.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Rhetoric and Democracy
Grant details: AKB-265731-19
Title: Rhetoric and Democracy
Author: Betsy Verhoeven
Author: Emma Fleck
Author: Nick Clark
Abstract: The course serves as a bridge between theories of Rhetoric, Marketing and Democracy with empirical research on the relationship between political elites and mass behavior. The course will begin by defining rhetoric, considering different types of and devices for using rhetoric and learning the fundamentals of rhetorical analysis, whereby students will learn to identify the specific rhetorical strategies employed within democracy and the wider media.  In addition, this class will examine the ethics of rhetoric in marketing, including questions of who is included and excluded from messaging and considering the best rules for rhetorical participation to maintain open communication. This will studies using a range of contexts to include society, democracy and the economy.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: will be available on website: https://www.susqu.edu/academics/national-endowment-for-the-humanities/neh-faculty-resources
Primary URL Description: Website offering faculty resources.
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus
Grant details: AKB-265731-19
Title: Syllabus
Author: Fleck, Emma
Author: Verhoeven, Betsy
Author: Clark, Nick
Abstract: This is the syllabus for a general education course that studied national polarization and taught strategies for depolarizing national discourse. The class draws from the fields of political science, marketing, and rhetoric.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Spatial Effects: Places for Healing and Well-being
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Spatial Effects: Places for Healing and Well-being
Author: Atsuko Sakai
Abstract: The places we inhabit everyday are mostly invisible for the majority of people. Unless we provide an opportunity to observe and analyze them—our surroundings are generally taken for granted much like breathing air. Most people do not realize that our surroundings and how they are designed can affect our daily functions and behavior— often unconsciously, and that good design can contribute in a positive way to our feelings and healing because the ultimate goal of spatial design is the embodiment of human experience. In this course, we will start with phenomenology of architecture, and then we will apply these concepts to spatial designs for care, healing, and well-being. The course consists of five critical themes: 1) Design Philosophy; 2) Neuroscience and Architecture; 3) Places for Healing in a Global Context; 4) Places for Well-being in a Local Context; and 5) Design Thinking - Design Processes for Improving our Surroundings.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Narrative Medicine
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Narrative Medicine
Author: Lindy Davidson
Abstract: Medical institutions rely heavily on lists in order to communicate with and about patients (Browning, 1992), yet Arthur Frank (1995) says that patients find their way through illness by telling their stories. In order to improve understanding about patients’ perspectives of health and illness, their stories must be reclaimed from the diagnostic lists and treatments that dominate patient identities. As medical schools begin to select students based not only on their scientific acumen but also their understanding of the humanities, they are recognizing what Rita Charon (2008) states: Along with their growing scientific expertise, doctors need the expertise to listen to their patients, to understand as best they can the ordeals of illness, to honor the meanings of their patients’ narratives of illness, and to be moved by what they behold so that they can act on their patients’ behalf (p. 3). In addition to aiding in their treatment of patients, narrative medicine offers a means for medical practitioners to reflect on difficult cases by exploring their emotions and personal challenges in a career that is marked by significant stress (Roscoe, 2012). Students will read illness narratives and the theoretical background of narrative medicine, develop their own personal narratives of health and illness, and work with others to narrativize their illness experiences.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Masculinities, Health, & (Dis)Order
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Masculinities, Health, & (Dis)Order
Author: Holly Singh
Abstract: This course centers on how masculinities influence health behaviors, outcomes, and ethical debates in the contemporary world, introducing and drawing on methods of inquiry, discovery, and knowledge creation from the social and behavioral sciences. Topics will include: making gender and gendered bodies; sexuality and changing gender roles; family and male honor; men's health; and masculinities in religion, nationalism, violence, and global commerce.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Health, Healing, and Everyday Crises in Southeast Asia
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Health, Healing, and Everyday Crises in Southeast Asia
Author: Holly Singh
Abstract: Using regions in the Majority World as sites of study, this course explores how the interconnectedness of diverse spaces, places, and peoples constitute community. Through the examination of locales, historical periods, and the people who inhabit them, students will take an interdisciplinary approach to the relationships between the local, regional and global.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Acquisition of Knowledge: Medical Humanities in a Global Context
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Acquisition of Knowledge: Medical Humanities in a Global Context
Author: Atsuko Sakai
Author: Benjamin Young
Abstract: Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, independent research, studio experiences, and assignments, this course will explore the meaning and value of interdisciplinary inquiry for the cultivation of practical wisdom in our personal and civic lives.Unlike our typical AOK classes, this class focuses on a specific theme, Medical Humanities (MH). DSS 1-MHGC:Why Study Medical Humanities? DSS 2-MHGC:Introducing Medical Humanities: History & Concept DSS 3-MHGC:Exploring Philosophical Approaches DSS 4-MHGC:Eudaimonia: Human Well-being beyond the Absence of Illness DSS 5-MHGC:Theory & Practice: Making Art Accessible to People DSS 6-MHGC:Theory & Practice: Observing & Making Sense DSS 7-MHGC:Problem Solving: Architecture & Design DSS 8-MHGC:Existential Case Study: Judgment & Context DSS 9-MHGC:Existential Case Study: Stories DSS 10-MHGC:Conclusion: Medical Humanities in a Global Context Medical Humanities (DSS) sessions will include specific cases and stories along with additional resources for your reference. Therefore, the course-preparation materials for Medical Humanities are multi-faceted, which is intended to help you explore different types of, ideas about, and approaches to Medical Humanities within a limited timeframe. Ultimately, you should be able to provide your own answer to the question “What are Medical Humanities?” and at the end of the semester you might discover areas within the field of Medical Humanities you would be interested in when considering your Medical Humanities pathway at the Honors College.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: What Is a Criminal?
Grant details: AQ-228955-15
Title: Syllabus: What Is a Criminal?
Author: Katherine Gaudet
Abstract: Criminals are people who break the law -- In theory. How do people become criminals (with regard to biological, cultural, and economic influences)? What happens to them in the criminal justice system, and how does the system shape the definition of "criminal"? We will also discuss "criminals of conscience" from Thoreau and Gandhi to Edward Snowden. The course will emphasize reading but will also engage with other media, including films, podcasts, and visual art.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus for "What is Happiness?"
Grant details: AQ-248180-16
Title: Syllabus for "What is Happiness?"
Author: Matthew Meyer
Author: Kristin Schaupp
Abstract: This syllabus is the product of multiple iterations of our Enduring Questions grant course entitled "What is Happiness? A multidisciplinary and multicultural approach." It was intended for a class size of 30-50 and as a general course without any prerequisites.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1748v6xkKX_i99OvDplRN3gnNZq-Ub8Tf/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: This is a link to a Google drive file of the syllabus.
Audience: Undergraduate


What is the Meaning of Work and Leisure?
Grant details: AQ-248310-16
Title: What is the Meaning of Work and Leisure?
Author: Jon K. Burmeister
Abstract: We spend much of our lives working, or preparing ourselves to work. We spend much of the rest of our time pursuing leisure. But what are our goals in doing so? How important is it for our work to be meaningful? Is leisure simply the absence of work, or something more? And what role do each of these play in a fulfilling life? This course will work to respond to these questions through the lenses of philosophy, sociology, religion, and economics. We will examine conceptions of work ranging from the idea that it is a necessary evil to the idea that it is a form of religious devotion. We will consider conceptions of leisure ranging from the view that it consists of relaxation, to the view that it is an activity one cannot engage in without prior self-development. From Aristotle to Adam Smith, from Martin Luther to Max Weber, we will study various accounts of what work and leisure have been, and what their ideal forms might be. The course will conclude by considering the coming age of technologically automated physical and mental labor, and its impact on the future of work and leisure.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://workandleisure.org/
Audience: Undergraduate


"Cosmos or Chaos? Views of the World, Views of the Good Life" syllabus
Grant details: AQ-50057-09
Title: "Cosmos or Chaos? Views of the World, Views of the Good Life" syllabus
Author: Laurence Cooper, Professor of Political Science, Carleton College
Abstract: A syllabus for a freshman seminar on philosophical views on the "good life." There is no question more important to us than the question of how we should live, or the question of the good life. Everything we do, however grand or petty, ultimately stems from our answer to the question of the good life. Yet if the question of the good life is the most basic of practical questions, it still rests on prior conceptions, or answers to prior questions—and one question perhaps more than any other: what is the fundamental character of the world?
Year: 2012
Primary URL: https://apps.carleton.edu/curricular/posc/assets/100F12.pdf
Primary URL Description: PDF version of the syllabus
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


What is the Nature of the Cosmos
Grant details: AQ-50223-10
Title: What is the Nature of the Cosmos
Author: J.B. Shank
Abstract: J.B. Shank was awarded the Morse Alumni Association Award for Distinguished contributions to Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota, and his awarded celebrated in particular his NEH funded course on "The Nature of the Cosmos."
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.scholarswalk.umn.edu/awards/aoce/pdf/2016/Shank-poster.pdf
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus for "What is Time?"
Grant details: AQ-50254-10
Title: Syllabus for "What is Time?"
Author: Jessie Fillerup
Abstract: This syllabus provides a list of topics, course materials, assignments, and policies for the NEH-supported course, "What is Time?"
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://music.richmond.edu/faculty/jfilleru/
Primary URL Description: The URL is a faculty webpage. The syllabus may be found under the "Grants" link.
Audience: K - 12


English 291: What Is Racial Difference?
Grant details: AQ-50712-12
Title: English 291: What Is Racial Difference?
Author: Cord J. Whitaker
Abstract: Is Race a modern problem? Is it medieval? Is it ancient? Is Race visual? Is it textual? Is it scientific? Is it religious? Is Race real? Is it imaginary? Is Race nothing? Is Race everything? These and similar questions inform readings, discussion, and writing in English 291. Together, we explore the nature of race from classical antiquity through modern day in philosophy, science, art, and literature. Together, we explore the variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of race. We also consider the historical, social, and economic pressures that have consolidated the idea of race. Together, we ask: what is racial difference? The course is divided into four units, reflecting three major elements of racial discourse: physical difference, geographical difference, and religious difference, along with a unit dedicated to our main objective: to develop a working definition of race.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://whatisracialdifference.com
Audience: Undergraduate


What is civility?
Grant details: AQ-50761-12
Title: What is civility?
Author: Ann Hartle
Abstract: Tentative syllabus for course on civility includes Aristotle's Ethics and Politics, Pieper's Leisure the Basis of Culture, Montaigne's Essays, Oakeshott's On Human Conduct, Shils's The Virtue of Civility.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


What does prayer do?
Grant details: AQ-50860-13
Title: What does prayer do?
Author: Karmen MacKendrick
Author: Jennifer A. Glancy
Abstract: The monk, the poet, the neuroscientist, the constitutional lawyer—all hear the question what does prayer do from their own perspectives. Students will approach this enduring question from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including theology, philosophy, religious studies, medicine, the social sciences, law, and the arts. Readings will be chosen from major wisdom traditions, with some emphasis on Christian examples.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.whatdoesprayerdo.net
Primary URL Description: Website designed to support teaching of course, What does prayer do?
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGLISH 4931: Cultural Preservation
Grant details: AQ-50920-13
Title: ENGLISH 4931: Cultural Preservation
Author: Gerry Canavan
Abstract: This is the Marquette University undergraduate course developed by the Enduring Questions grant. It was taught two times as a special topics course in the English department, in Spring 2014 and Spring 2015; the plan now is to make it a permanent part of the English bulletin under the revised name "Material Cultures"
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mucp2015.wordpress.com
Primary URL Description: This is the course site for the second offering of the course (Spring 2015).
Secondary URL: http://muculturalpreservation.wordpress.com
Secondary URL Description: This is the course site for the first offering of the course (Spring 2014).
Audience: Undergraduate


Course: NEH Enduring Questions Course: Cultural and Scientific Understandings of Empathy
Grant details: AQ-51021-14
Title: Course: NEH Enduring Questions Course: Cultural and Scientific Understandings of Empathy
Author: Margarete Landwehr
Abstract: Since May 2014 through November 2014, I read most of the readings and secondary literature required for this new course. The course syllabus has been submitted to the West Chester University curriculum committee and has just been approved. It is scheduled to be taught in Spring 2015 and in Fall 2015 (as an Honors Course), as per the schedule in my NEH proposal. Since September 2014, a West Chester University student has created a website and is scanning course readings onto the website. Additional preparatory reading will be completed in December 2014 and January 2015.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


2016 Echoes of War Discussion Leaders Training Journal
Grant details: AV-248453-16
Title: 2016 Echoes of War Discussion Leaders Training Journal
Author: Minnesota Humanities Center's Echoes of War scholar team
Abstract: With the help of outstanding scholars and leading voices from Minnesota’s Veteran communities, the Humanities Center’s 2016 Echoes of War project included an immersive experience to train 10 NEH Discussion Leaders to lead public discussions in Saint Paul and Northfield, Minnesota. This is the comprehensive Discussion Leaders Training Journal developed for the training. The contents include a welcome letter for the Humanities Center’s President & CEO, overview description and Humanities Center’s approach, funding credit, list of discussion leaders, list of scholar team and key staff, descriptions and sessions schedule for each of the six training days, journal and note pages for each day, and a bibliography of assigned readings.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://humanitieslearning.org/resource/index.cfm?act=1&TagID=0&CatID=0&SearchText=echoes&SortBy=1&mediatype=0&lurl=1
Primary URL Description: This comprehensive Discussion Leaders Training Journal was developed for the Humanities Center’s 2016 Echoes of War project.
Audience: General Public


Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual
Grant details: AV-248477-16
Title: Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual
Author: Rayneard, Max
Abstract: Planting the Oar seeks to bridge the divide between veterans and civilians by facilitating discussion between them around great literary texts that examine civilian / veteran relations. The Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual has two purposes: 1) To provide context and guidance for the texts discussed in Planting the Oar Discussion Groups 2) to prepare participants so they will arrive at discussion groups having given thought to the literary texts they have read and they questions they give rise to. The manual provides facilitates discussion on the following subjects: Week 1 - What is a Veteran? / What is a Civilian? Week 2 and 3 - The Odyssey Week 4 - Othello Week 5 - The poetry of Wilfred Owen Week 6 and 7 - The Things They Carried Week 8 - The script of Telling: Orlando Each week is divided into three sections. 1) provides a rationale for the inclusion of the text in the Planting the Oar curriculum, a brief overview of history, context, and aesthetic forms of the text, and where relevant, a very broad overview of the plot and characters in the text. 2) Open ended free-writing prompts meant to facilitate discussion 3) A selection of key quotations from the text, as well as prompts for discussion
Year: 2017
Primary URL: thetellingproject.org/planting-the-oar
Primary URL Description: Provides more information on Planting the Oar, as well as contact details of the author.
Audience: General Public


Memoirs of War: Vietnam to Afghanistan
Grant details: AV-248478-16
Title: Memoirs of War: Vietnam to Afghanistan
Author: Jennifer L. Andersen
Abstract: This is a new graduate seminar which I will be teaching to English M.A. students in spring 2017. I am also seeking funding to support service learning opportunities for students in the course, where students would lead literature discussions for veterans and civilians at local libraries.
Year: 2016
Primary URL Description: spring 2017 courses are not yet listed on the CSUSB electronic class schedule.
Audience: Graduate


Telling the Story: A Book Group for Veterans
Grant details: AV-248494-16
Title: Telling the Story: A Book Group for Veterans
Author: Maine Humanities Council and schloars
Abstract: Syllabuses created for the groups held from February–September 2017
Year: 2017
Audience: Other


Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on the Military Graphic Novel
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on the Military Graphic Novel
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Kathleen Dale, PhD
Abstract: The discussion group series is purposefully designed to provide Veterans the time and support to reflect on and discuss experiences with war and moral injury. This 5-week program combines the graphic novel genre with contemporary war poetry as an entry point for difficult moral and spiritual dialogues. Max Uriarte’s novel, The White Donkey, is the main source. Each week is organized around a 90-minute session, beginning with a collective reading of sections from the novel and followed by semi-structured questions facilitated by a leader. Please see the accompanying Discussion Leader Guide for this Warriors Path series.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.katinkahooyer.org/ux-portfolio/war-and-reclaiming-the-soul/
Primary URL Description: This website is the project director's portfolio site and provides information on the Warriors Path Discussion Series, 2018-2019, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities Dialogues on the Experience War program.
Secondary URL: https://mcw.academia.edu/KatinkaHooyer/Syllabi-and-Curriculums
Secondary URL Description: This website is an online curriculum vitae and knowledge-sharing site for academics. The Warriors Path syllabi and discussion guides are located on the project director’s site.
Audience: Other


Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on Shakespeare’s Historical Plays
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on Shakespeare’s Historical Plays
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Nancy Smith-Watson
Author: Jim Tasse
Abstract: The discussion group series is purposefully designed to provide Veterans the time and support to reflect on and discuss experiences with war and moral injury. This 5-week program combines the scenes from Shakespeare’s plays with contemporary war poetry as an entry point for difficult moral and spiritual dialogues. Scenes from Coriolanus, Henry V, Henry IV, and Henry VI are the main sources. Each week is organized around a 90-minute session, beginning with a collective reciting of scenes, with lines from the scenes fed to participants. This scenework is followed by semi-structured questions facilitated by a leader. Please see the accompanying Discussion Leader Guide for this Warriors Path series.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.katinkahooyer.org/ux-portfolio/war-and-reclaiming-the-soul/
Primary URL Description: This website is the project director’s portfolio site and provides information on the Warriors Path Discussion Series, 2018-2019, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities Dialogues on the Experience War program.
Secondary URL: https://mcw.academia.edu/KatinkaHooyer/Syllabi-and-Curriculums
Secondary URL Description: This website is an online curriculum vitae and knowledge-sharing site.
Audience: Other


Heroics in the Military Context
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Heroics in the Military Context
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Zeno Franco, PhD
Author: Jenny Plevin
Abstract: This series of short videos addresses society’s moral responsibility to warfighters, what it means to serve above and beyond the call of duty in the military context, the notion of heroism as a "redemptive" act, and the relationship of heroics and moral injury.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://vimeo.com/docuwm
Primary URL Description: doc|UWM is the documentary media center in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Peck School of the Arts' Department of Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres which bridges academics with real world experience and gives students the unique opportunity to work on professional productions. Students and affiliated faculty collaborate on short-form videos that raise awareness about a variety of contemporary political and social issues as well as feature-length documentaries for public television broadcast
Audience: Undergraduate


War and Healing Participant Guidebook
Grant details: AV-260657-18
Title: War and Healing Participant Guidebook
Author: Jessica L. Adler and Brahim Almarales
Abstract: This is the participant guidebook for the War and Healing program, which took place in Miami, Florida in 2018-2019. Distributed to program participants at the beginning of each discussion series, it contains an explanation of the program, reading lists, and reading excerpts.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://historyofhealth.fiu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/WHParticGuideLargeF.pdf
Audience: General Public


War and Healing: A Century of Veterans Reintegration [Participant Guidebook]
Grant details: AV-260657-18
Title: War and Healing: A Century of Veterans Reintegration [Participant Guidebook]
Author: Jessica L. Adler
Author: Brahim Almarales
Abstract: This Guidebook was prepared for participants in War and Healing reading/discussion groups that took place in the Fall of 2018 and the Winter of 2019. It contains general information about the program and its goals, reading lists, and reading excerpts to be discussed.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://historyofhealth.fiu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/WHParticGuideLargeF.pdf
Audience: General Public


Large Scale Discussion Flyer
Grant details: AV-265985-19
Title: Large Scale Discussion Flyer
Author: Aris Banaag
Abstract: Large Scale Discussion Program
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aVdqUv9_-kxQOnEkBK-TuyNZ3NSwW6RQ/view?usp=sharing
Audience: General Public


Malie Mau
Grant details: AV-265985-19
Title: Malie Mau
Author: Kyle Nakenlua
Abstract: Hawaiian Chant before war
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ueVb5tolUBcssKvLAXBy1Z67E6ZXrMbd/view?usp=sharing
Audience: General Public


Ka Ho'ea Mai Ana Power Point Presentation
Grant details: AV-265985-19
Title: Ka Ho'ea Mai Ana Power Point Presentation
Author: Aris Banaag
Abstract: Power Point presentation
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ddkGM81xuAc5ChgIEf3ON2fazMaaAOMF/view?usp=sharing
Audience: General Public


NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center
Grant details: BH-231287-15
Title: NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center
Author: Various NEH workshop participants, 2010 - present
Abstract: The NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center serves as a digital archive of participants' contributed lesson plans, reflections, and other materials created during the workshop. The Resource Center is accessible to current and former NEH participants, as well as the general public.
Year: 2010
Primary URL: http://deltacenterdsu.com/lesson-plans-1
Audience: Other


Brain Writing Lesson Plan
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Brain Writing Lesson Plan
Author: Jesica Stock
Abstract: Through a Brain-Writing Activity, educators will receive feedback and development suggestions on a lesson plan idea based on a topic of their choosing, and reflective of their experiences during the NEH America’s Industrial Revolution Workshop at The Henry Ford.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Who Really Invented the McCormick Reaper?
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Who Really Invented the McCormick Reaper?
Author: Jesica Stock
Author: Deb Reid
Abstract: Through a study of primary and secondary sources, students will consider how a historical narrative is built and supported over time. Students will consider sources bias and motivations, contemporary context, and other explicit and implicit factors that historians consider when constructing a historical narrative. Students will then develop a historical narrative based on their reading of the sources.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Source Evaluation
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Source Evaluation
Author: Jesica Stock
Abstract: Created to teach students to evaluate historical sources.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Tic-Tac-Toe Technology Project
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Tic-Tac-Toe Technology Project
Author: Lisa Bircher
Abstract: Grade 9 Physical Science Lesson Plan. Created using THF digital resources and content delivered during the project.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


African Americans in the Making of Early New England
Grant details: BH-261659-18
Title: African Americans in the Making of Early New England
Author: Lynne Manring
Author: Joanne Melish
Abstract: This NEH Landmarks Workshop of American History and Culture served as a graduate course for participating teachers who desired graduate credits. The course was offered through Westfield State University.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/
Primary URL Description: Website for the NEH Landmarks of American History & Culture Workshop, "African Americans in the Making of Early New England"
Audience: Graduate


Lessons by teachers
Grant details: BH-261659-18
Title: Lessons by teachers
Author: 2019 "African Americans in the Making of Early New England" participants
Abstract: Participants were required to produce lessons by the end of the workshop week.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/
Primary URL Description: Workshop website for "African Americans in the Making of Early New England"
Secondary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/lessons-by-teachers/
Secondary URL Description: This is the section of our workshop website where we post lessons created by participating teachers.
Audience: K - 12


Lesson plan
Grant details: BH-261682-18
Title: Lesson plan
Author: Megan McGrath
Abstract: One of the most important lessons I took away from the NEH Lowell workshop is the importance of students “doing history” and learning about the American Industrial Revolution through activities and tours of the sites where history happened. My aim while creating the following lessons was to achieve the mission of the Tsongas Industrial History Center by inspiring, “...connections with and understandings about America's industrial past, present, and future through experiential learning using Lowell's unique resources.” The following lessons include opportunities for students to complete primary and secondary source based activities in which Lowell’s history is used as a case study to explore the causes and consequences of the American Industrial Revolution.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Lesson plan
Grant details: BH-261682-18
Title: Lesson plan
Author: Kaitlin Magsarili
Abstract: Throughout my participation in “The Lowell Experience” workshop, I have not only increased my background knowledge of Lowell’s impact on the Industrial Revolution, but I have gained access to valuable resources I can use in my teaching practice. My fifth graders often have a difficult time imagining what life would have been like throughout periods of history and they learn best through visuals and role-play. Therefore, when developing my lessons following the workshop, I wanted to focus on allowing students to explore the Industrial Revolution through hands-on activities, research-based lessons, and creative experiences. I’d also love to take my students on a field trip to the Tsongas Industrial History Center and encourage colleagues at my school to do the same. In the following lessons, you’ll find more information on the context of the lessons as well as lesson objectives and essential questions. I plan to share these lessons and resources with my colleagues to help all fifth grade students in my school gain a deeper understanding of the Industrial Revolution as it pertains to Lowell, our town’s neighboring city.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


NEH 2019 Summer Institute Teacher Created Lesson Plans
Grant details: BH-261703-18
Title: NEH 2019 Summer Institute Teacher Created Lesson Plans
Author: Charlene Mano Shen
Author: Rahul Gupta
Author: Various
Abstract: NEH 2019 Summer Teacher Workshops -- Created Lesson Plans and Curriculum R