Grant products: Course or Curricular Materials (393)
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Assignments- Defining Creole
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Defining Creole
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Defining the term Creole
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Lynn Strong
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Dr. Lovell Agwaramgbo
Abstract: Course materials to provide students and faculty with IRB Human Research Training and Worskhops prior to interviews
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Ethnographies
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Ethnographies
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Materials to write an ethnography of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Author: Mark Raymond
Abstract: Training and materials for filming of interviews. 2 sessions with hands-on work.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Lesson plans and materials for documenting cultural traditions of New Orleans Creoles and/or of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Defining Creole and Creole terms
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Defining Creole and Creole terms
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Abstract: Material on the definitions of Creole and Creole terms such as "boo" or "beaucoup"
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Autobiography: Culture 2017
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Autobiography: Culture 2017
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This is the second assignment infusing culture into the curriculum for the first-year experience; this one refreshes the student autobiographical assignment adding lessons learned from the introduction to folklore, What is Culture?
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing Folklore to students, the field of folklore, what folklorists do, what we will do at Dillard University in Documenting and Defining Black Creole Culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing students to Creole, the process, language, culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This undergraduate curriculum guide introduces students to Folklore through the lens of culture. It includes Faith as a cultural practice. From defining necessary concepts such as tales, fables, to demonstrating Tradition Bearers who create artifacts and cultural practice, this guide gives an overview with contemporary media links of examples.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: After introducing Folklore, this is one of two assignments given in the first-year seminar applying features of the introduction to Folklore, this assignment investigates Hip Hop as Cultural Practice.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Grant details: AB-253419-17
Title: Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Author: Anthony Dixon, Ph.D.,
Author: Jeanette Ford, Ph.D.
Author: A. Preston, Ph.D.
Author: E. Mowatt, Ph.D.
Abstract: Please see Appendix A.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Grant details: AB-258964-18
Title: Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Author: Dr. Carla J. Bell (PI) and Dr. Lisa Bratton (Co PI)
Abstract: (TSACS) in conjunction with the department of History was awarded a grant to develop humanities subject matter and content – architecture, education, history and philosophy – for a first-ever 18-credit-hour interdisciplinary minor in African American studies with a concentration in the Tuskegee Architects and the History of the Built Environment in the South. The minor will explore ways of thinking, researching and writing about the diverse experiences of African-Americans and human culture — such endeavors at an HBCU are often more limited in the curricular sense. The new minor seeks to extend African American history and liberal arts, formally into the architecture curriculum through new humanities offerings – and in so doing, provide a more focused historical perspective for students’ current educational and professional trajectories. The minor will be discipline specific to architecture and seeks to integrate humanities approach into the professional training of architects and builders. Unlike many historical arguments, this minor goes beyond documenting educational inequities and offers an alternative curriculum that will advance diverse issues and inclusiveness in architecture and humanities education. The product of the worksop will be the development of three new architecture course syllabi for classes beginning fall 2018. This minor will serve as a model for other HBCUs with Schools of Architecture and will unveil how to integrate the humanities into other professional disciplines as well as stimulate the revision of existing humanities courses to bridge humanities studies with professional schools.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Grant details: AB-50120-12
Title: Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Author: Dr. Philip J. Merrill & Mrs. Betty Merrill; Veronica Carr; Dr. Marilyn D. Button
Abstract: This DVD offers six modules, each covering a different aspect of the global heritage and legacy of Lincoln University of Pennsylvania. It includes interviews with well known Lincoln University alumni, including Carol Black, Hersey Gray and explores current student perspectives on their Lincoln University education. This DVD is of general interest, and designed specifically for classroom use to enhance student awareness of the unique roles that Lincoln alumni have played in important national and international developments, including and especially Civil Rights.
Year: 2015
Audience: General Public


Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Grant details: AC-226779-15
Title: Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Author: See participating faculty names in "Accomplishments" section
Abstract: Upon completion of the Faculty Development workshops, faculty participants revised their syllabi to integrate at least three (3) assignments/activities cultivating two (2) or more of the project's designated global competencies into their classes.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://bmcc.libguides.com/global; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503377; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503127
Primary URL Description: fall 2015, summer 2016, and fall 2016 faculty cohort information.
Audience: Undergraduate


Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Grant details: AC-234283-16
Title: Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Author: Emily Clark (professor and grant cohort member)
Author: Zenon Culverhouse
Abstract: Trauma Studies Minor, a track that stems from the proposed Medical Humanities Minor, housed in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. CHASS faculty is uniquely positioned to understand and lead transformative work in the rapidly growing area of trauma studies. Currently existing programs in trauma studies world-wide focus exclusively on psychological and psychiatric approaches. The multi-disciplinary, intersectional approach to Trauma Studies that has emerged from the grant work at UIW will be unique in that it leverages the scholarship and deep expertise across several disciplines to work together to share knowledge, develop innovative ways to address trauma, and to share these findings with our local community as well as with academic communities within and outside of UIW. In essence, the trauma track of this minor allows students to develop a broad and nuanced understanding of traumatic experience and, more importantly, apply that knowledge in their careers and daily lives. The trauma track also requires that students complete some of their service hours at an organization that aids traumatized populations (such as combat veterans, immigrants, and victims of sexual or domestic violence).
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Author: Susan Roberson
Abstract: Using literary and theoretical texts this course will explore the characteristics of South Texas Women Writers. Doing so, students will read key literary texts, some critical essays about the borderlands and women's writing. They will write reflection papers on the texts and construct a cultural project that demonstrates their understanding of the culture from which the literature arises.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Chicana/o Literature
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: Chicana/o Literature
Author: Jody Marin
Abstract: This course contextualized the Chicano Movement and explored issues of subjectivity, identity, and agency as they pertain to Chicanidad through the study of Chicana/o literature.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: South Texas Women Artists
Author: Stephanie Salazar-Amaro
Abstract: • In her high school Humanities class, Stephanie Salazar-Amaro used poetry from the Entre Malinche y Guadalupe collection, art from Carmen Lomas Garza, and passages from La Frontera/Borderlands by Gloria Anzaldúa. She did some cross curricular work with the Spanish teacher to help the students understand the Spanish language portions of the passage and was able to guide the students through an analysis of the texts/art pieces. The students enjoyed looking at familiar scenes, and those who were unfamiliar with the material asked questions. As a class, they were able to discuss the family traditions in South Texas and how they were portrayed in art. Stephanie intends to use more poetry and passages in her AP Literature class next six weeks
Year: 2018
Audience: K - 12


Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: This is a collaborative writing assignment. You will collaborate with an interview participant in building content for your paper. Also keep in mind that your fellow 1301 students and I are your audience. Tell your story in a way that will be interesting to those outside of your story—your readers.Select from one of the following topics. If you have an idea beyond what's listed below, send me a message.?Interview a family member about a specific family recipe or food tradition. Family recipes could be something unique to your family, or your family's background. Or maybe it's a common dish you eat regularly, but it has special associations for you. (These are just examples - you may use any family food story that's interesting to you!)?Interview someone from your community about a food tradition. Do you have a neighbor who takes pride in their BBQ? Have you ever wondered how that Cambodian donut shop owner started their business? Interview them and write about it.?Explore the roots of a family meal. How does it come together? What's its significance for you and your family? Who prepares it? Are there any rituals surrounding it?
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Author: Michael Berberich
Abstract: You need to begin by writing an opening paragraph that provides your readers with an overview of what the project is about. [Summer semester 2018 the container was filled with multiple colored peppercorns.] You can be creative here if you want. That means you can imagine and invent a context for the assignment that goes beyond information I have provided; you cannot change or alter the rules of the assignment, however. To begin, you should define any key terms that will be implemented in any your methodologies. After all, readers need to know what it is exactly that you are counting. So, for example, what will count as a red peppercorn? This is what is known as an existential question, i.e., something that addresses the very nature of a thing. All explanations in the assignment must be written in full sentences.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Food History
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Food History
Author: Larry Blomstedt
Abstract: Selections from various authors discussing historical foodways.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: I am offering students the option of participating in a service learning project, which will substitute for some of the required elements of the course. For fall semester 2019, students can choose to complete two full shifts (these vary in length) with one of the following local food-related projects: Before you select a Service Learning project, click on the links below to learn more about these excellent Galveston community organizations. Galveston’s Own Farmer’s Market Sunday shifts from 8:00-1:00 Galveston College Food For Thought: Food Scholarship Program, Wednesday shifts on 9/18 and 10/23 from 9:30-1:30 GOFM Young Gardeners Program, Select Saturday Shifts at Rosenberg Elementary, Oppe Elementary, L.A. Morgan Elementary, and Crenshaw Elementary TBA Seeding Galveston, Shifts/Workdays TBA
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Author: Sufian
Abstract: revised the teaching guide framework document in response to feedback from experts in year one and from faculty core and team members at end of year one.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Author: Sufian
Abstract: Revised HHP Framework document, responsive to project team, experts, and faculty core feedback.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


HUA196 Latin American Art
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUA196 Latin American Art
Author: Liena Vayzman
Abstract: This course introduces students to the visual art traditions of Latin America through lecture, readings, and discussion. Topics include: pre-Hispanic art and architecture, Latina/o art, Spanish/Portuguese colonial-era art, Mexican moderism, and post-colonial art. Students analyze the meaning and techniques of selected artworks in Latin American art history through written assignments and oral presentations.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM107 Music of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUM107 Music of Latin America
Author: William Fulton
Abstract: This course is a survey of the music of Latin America, from Brazilian samba to Dominican bachata and more. Latin American musical developments from the past and present will be studied to show the individual characteristics as well as the common elements within various styles, while considering the global impact of Latin Music genres. This course will expand students' understanding of world cultures and global issues through an interdisciplinary lens.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Author: Ryan Mann-Hamilton
Abstract: This course will focus on the different peoples and cultures of Latin America, including Indigenous groups, Afro descendant communities, European emigrants and other communities engaged in the formation of the category of mestizo. The social and cultural organization of each of these groups will be examined, particularly in their relationship to the larger society. The impact of the global economy on Latin American cultures will also be examined.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Author: Belkis González
Abstract: This course examines the literary and cultural production of hispanophone, francophone, and anglophone regions of the Caribbean and of the Caribbean diaspora in the U.S. It surveys the variety of Caribbean writing, exploring how its texts represent community, class, race, gender, culture, nation, and ethnicity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will analyze literature alongside visual culture, musical genres, and historical narratives.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUN192 Art and Society
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUN192 Art and Society
Author: Arianne Fernandez
Abstract: Students will create a reaction piece that will highlight an issue of their choosing in a particular neighborhood of NYC. The work must be influenced in some way by the body of work of at least one Latin American artist from the list provided by the instructor.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Author: Ernesto Menéndez-Conde
Abstract: This low stake assignment was developed upon attending to the Seminar Enriching Latin American Studies. This seminar helped me to understand cultural processes in Latin American in a deeper manner. It particularly helped me to be more aware of the connections between the Marvelous Real -as Cuban writer Alejo Carpentier defines the term- and transculturation, as defined by Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz. I am also interested in developing interdisciplinary approaches in my Latin American Fiction in Translation (ELS250) class. With this assignment, I would like to explore the links between Alejo Carpentier’s writing and music, while helping students to appreciate Carpentier’s prose, and the links between Baroque aesthetics, transculturation and the concept of Latin American Marvelous Real.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Author: Juan Recondo
Abstract: This course will introduce students to theatre and performance practices throughout the Americas (U.S. Latinx community, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Hispanophone Caribbean). We will examine how the drama reflects the different histories and cultures of Latin America. Furthermore, we will explore an intercultural dialogue between national dramas to identify connections between the different Americas. The course will delve into topics dealing with politics, history, dictatorship and revolution, imperialism and colonialism, identity (gender, sexual, national, and racial/ethnic, among others), borders, mestizaje, and indigenous performances. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the scholarship and drama of Latin America and the artists’ relation to U.S. and European cultural practices.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Author: Cory Rowe-Feldman
Abstract: Dr. Rowe-Feldman's assignment uses excerpts from Kirsten Weld's Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala to explore history, memory, and justice in Guatemala and the United States. In a multi-part assignment, she asks students to compare excerpts from Paper Cadavers with materials in LaGuardia's archive collection. Ultimately students examine how societies forget and remember political violence.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


MUS206 Music from Paterson course syllabus
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: MUS206 Music from Paterson course syllabus
Author: Dr. Barbara Gordon
Abstract: Course Syllabus about the genres and types of music by various major composers and performers from Paterson, NJ.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: N/A: Word doc
Primary URL Description: Course syllabus Word doc
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG122 Literature of Paterson
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ENG122 Literature of Paterson
Author: Dr. Sherida Yoder
Abstract: This is an immersive study of the literature of Paterson, NJ, through academic study, field trips, and interviews with Paterson writers. Students will visit relevant historic and artistic sites and study widely acclaimed works by William Carlos Williams, Emma Goldman, Allen Ginsberg, John Updike, Junot Diaz, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Maria Mazziotti Gillan. and Rosa Alcala. Texts include non-fiction, poetry, short stories, novels, and memoirs. This course can be taken on its own or as part of the inor/certificate program Prism Paterson developed through funding by the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://felician.brightspace.com/d2l/le/content/19895/Home
Primary URL Description: This is the Felician University link to the elements of the syllabus of this course.
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG335 Community Writing: The Great Falls
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ENG335 Community Writing: The Great Falls
Author: Dr. Julie O'Connell
Abstract: Over the course of the semester, students read the perspectives of a variety of thinkers (social scientists, biologists, educational theorists, journalists, citizens, etc.).The class assumes a workshop format with in-class discussion and regular reading and writing assignments outside of the classroom. Students write papers and keep a weekly journal. For this particular class, students conduct interviews with individuals from Paterson. They complete a variety of research and writing tasks that may include articles, interviews, profiles, histories, reports, fact sheets, reviews, and web-based writing of use to audiences outside of the University. Some of the writing for the course will be published and distributed to a much wider audience and to different readers from those usually available to students.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http:// N/A Word doc
Primary URL Description: Word doc
Audience: Undergraduate


Art246 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: Art246 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Author: Dr. Michael Nyklewicz
Abstract: This course is dedicated to image construction and manipulation with a particular focus on images of Paterson, New Jersey. Students will begin to work with traditional art materials, moving on to experiment and elaborate within the digital realm, and finally realizing their completed project in printed form. This course was designed through the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http:// N/A Word doc
Primary URL Description: Word doc
Audience: Undergraduate


Minor in Prism Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Minor in Urban Arts and Humanities
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: Minor in Prism Paterson: An Interdisciplinary Minor in Urban Arts and Humanities
Author: Dr. Sherida Yoder
Abstract: Six courses comprise the Felician University Minor that focuses on the arts and humanities inspired by the city of Paterson, NJ. Three courses in literature and writing, one course in art, one in musical, and one in cultural studies and literature make up this minor.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://s30757.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/undergraduate-catalog-2019-2020.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to Felician undergraduate catalog
Audience: Undergraduate


Certificate in the Humanities/Humanistic Studies: Prism Paterson
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: Certificate in the Humanities/Humanistic Studies: Prism Paterson
Author: Dr. Sherida Yoder
Abstract: This interdisciplinary certificate program requires 12 credits selected from 6 courses that focus on the arts and humanities inspired by Paterson, NJ. The Certificate in Prism Paterson provides an immersive study of the photography, music, literature, and social and cultural history of Paterson. Students will investigate the arts of this city both as an academic discipline and a hands-on experience of the arts and humanities through field trips, interviews, writing, studio work, and creating their own works. Earning this certificate gives students a unique area of specialization.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http:/ N/A Word doc
Primary URL Description: Word doc
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Author: Dr. Déborah Gómez
Abstract: This is the new Spanish 1 curriculum at Florida Memorial University, our HBCU partner. Please see the attached syllabus.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HwvffJ4c5DKTV8ObSoq3HuZQj2bvq3Xx/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: Link to new syllabus
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample motivational video
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample motivational video
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Abstract: This is a sample motivational video of an author in our community who is telling students about why Spanish language learning is so important in her life and how it has enhanced her career.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c10EzeUEriuyeQfwrRanWXt4IyJV-3BX/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: Link to video
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample motivational video 2
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample motivational video 2
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Author: Dr. Uju Anya
Abstract: This is a sample motivational video that we made featuring Dr. Uju Anya, in which she describes why Spanish language learning is a way for black language learners to connect with the African diaspora in Latin America and why it will give them unique opportunities.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/18k5yIdpR8RVu2HoFMf3Y9xF0E56oKWcD/view?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Abstract: This is an example unit that shows the pedagogical tasks that we are creating for the FMU new Spanish language curriculum.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1eUM8ISuCKRUlXNa8skcOGgPsjykpQHj5?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample student outcome
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample student outcome
Author: (Students)
Abstract: This is an example of a task outcome, the final assessment task for which students are evaluated at the end of each task-cycle unit.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1SVFIT5ZBCju84amym2313yxg40QHoRtJ
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample student outcome 2
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample student outcome 2
Author: (students)
Abstract: This is another example of a task outcome, the final assessment task for which students are evaluated at the end of each task-cycle unit.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1tx38BQfP5-At0Z_XEFN0h9xN_J_VeZwx
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida International University - Sample teacher-training materials
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida International University - Sample teacher-training materials
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Abstract: This is an example of the teacher-training materials that we are creating as part of the project. The first page showcases an sample teacher-training module that will be used with Spanish language graduate students at Florida International University, as well as Spanish instructors via the MI-BRIDGE website. The next pages show a sample pedagogic task and the accompanying teacher methodological plan to implement that task into the classroom.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MZQO9a7eJ2WjmPf0RBXj51hY5QsUp-rM
Primary URL Description: Link to the teacher-training materials
Audience: Graduate


Beginning Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish I
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-101. Beginning Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This beginning level language course is an introduction to the Kurdish language and the student will develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Kurdish. Additionally, the student will acquire cultural appreciation.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: World Languages and Cultures department houses this course.
Audience: Undergraduate


Beginning Kurdish II
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish II
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-102. Beginning Kurdish II. 3 Hours. A continuation and further development of the basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing of Kurdish, and cultural appreciation, introduced in KURD-101: Beginning Kurdish I.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Intermediate Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Intermediate Kurdish I
Author: Ibrahim Bor
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: KURD-201. Intermediate Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach intermediate-level Kurdish to enable students to function in informal, formal, and academic contexts where Kurdish is spoken or used as a medium of communication and/or research.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Author: Mucahit Bilici
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: WLC-200K. Kurdish Culture. 3 Hours. This course introduces students to various aspects of Kurdish society. The course incorporates a number of perspectives: anthropological, sociological and cultural studies. It provides an overview of Kurdish society with special attention given to questions of identity, history, important literary and cultural texts and figures, music and dance, food and folkways. Finally, contemporary challenges faced by various parts of Kurdish society will be explored in relation to statelessness and diaspora.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Author: Ibrahim Demir
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: The teacher training workshop will present practices and techniques related to the teaching of foreign and second languages to both children and adults. The workshop will further train teachers who are competent in implementing standards-based Kurdish language instruction in their classrooms. The participants will learn how to integrate culture, content, and language in Kurdish instruction at various proficiency levels and needs. The workshop will also address effective practices and innovative language teaching and will disseminate some of the materials developed for the Summer School of Kurdish Language and Culture conducted at Northeastern Illinois University.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


The Water and Culture Reader
Grant details: AC-50067-09
Title: The Water and Culture Reader
Author: Department of English, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio
Abstract: This anthology is being used as a required text book in English Composition I and II and World Literature Studies. It contains articles that are divided into the following chapters: Sacred Water, Global Water, Water in San Antonio and the Southwest, Water in Asia, Water in Africa, Water in Literature: Poetry, and Water in Literature; Prose. Thus, it reflects the thematic and geographical scope of the lecture series over the past three years. The proceeds from this book are directed to a restricted fund and will allow us to sustain the lecture series and related activities the grant afforded us well into the future.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Author: Nayereh Tohidi
Abstract: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/ws
Audience: Undergraduate


JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Author: Jody Myers
Abstract: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Graduate


PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Author: Homa Esfarjani
Abstract: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/mcll/
Audience: Undergraduate


RS346: Sufism
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: RS346: Sufism
Author: Mustafa Ruzgar
Abstract: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Undergraduate


JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Author: Melissa Wall
Abstract: In this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: n this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/journalism/index.html
Audience: Graduate


ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Author: Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and on the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, etc.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Author: Dr. Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, weather, etc. This section is mostly lab work.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Grant details: AC-50146-12
Title: New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Author: Dr. Montserrat Reguant
Author: Dr. Julie Feldman-Abe
Author: Dr. Jane Crawford
Author: Dr. Paul Green
Author: Dr. Michelle Fine
Author: Dr. Alan Lee
Author: Dr. David Leese
Author: Patty Melnick
Abstract: As a result of the activities carried out during this grant period (AC-50146-12), and pursuant to the grant outcomes, Mount St. Mary's College faculty members revised and created a total of 15 new courses with the goal of internationalizing the curricula of said courses. Courses created and revised were: BUS 183, CS 117, CS 120, CS 280, EDU 199/299, ENG 126, HUM 264, HUM 269H, HUM 271, CS, NUR 160, NUR 161, PHIL 15, PHIL 21, PHIL 152, PT 476.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.msmc.la.edu/academics/neh-grant-experience/grant-outcomes.asp
Primary URL Description: This URL links to a site that houses the syllabi for the new and modified courses.
Audience: Graduate


The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Author: Dr. Anderson Brown
Author: Dr. J. Fernando Vega
Author: Dr. Ana Nieves
Abstract: A team taught course titled "Mind, Consciousness, and Computers" is a General Education Course that explores the philosophical, psychological, and technological interdisciplinary aspects and uses of Artificial Intelligence.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana L. Collins
Abstract: Appropriate Technology: Detailed description for second offering of course Following the appropriate technology tradition and philosophy of technology as theoretical frameworks, this course examines practices of technology innovation and engineering design, and conceptions of human progress. The student develops skills in scientific reasoning and philosophy to be able to critique contemporary technological culture and compare alternative technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally. A partir de la tradición en tecnología apropiada y la filosofía de la tecnología como marcos teóricos, este curso examina prácticas de innovación en tecnología y de diseño ingenieril, y conceptos de progreso humano. El estudiante desarrolla habilidades en razonamiento científico y en filosofía para poder hacer un análisis crítico de la cultura tecnológica contemporánea y poder comparar opciones tecnológicas alternas que están orientadas a lograr sustentabilidad y a promover el bienestar humano en las comunidades y globalmente.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana Collins
Abstract: The second offering of the course Appropriate and Alternative Technologies required a revised syllabus that responded to the student evaluations for the first offering of the course. This revised syllabus included a revised reading list for the students as well as revising the objectives of the course. The fifth objective was revised as follows: 5. Students will be encouraged to develop a shared sense of responsibility for choosing and for collaborating in bringing about the technologies that go with achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: ecourses.uprm.edu
Primary URL Description: This is published on the moodle page for the University.
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture from ancient times (including the Babylonian and Egyptian cultures) through the Renaissance will be examined. This course will address the enduring questions of "What is progress", What defines us as human beings", and "How does technology affect our culture".
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture from the 1600's to present times will be examined. This course will address the enduring questions of "What is progress", What defines us as human beings", and "How does technology affect our culture".
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Technology, Justice, and Wellbeing (revised course)
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Technology, Justice, and Wellbeing (revised course)
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Abstract: Study of contemporary technological culture and comparison with alternative and appropriate technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability, improving the conditions of life on earth and satisfying the needs of the community. En español: Estudio de la cultura tecnológica contemporánea y comparación con opciones tecnológicas alternativas y apropiadas orientadas a la sustentabilidad, a mejorar las condiciones de vida en la tierra, y a satisfacer las necesidades de la comunidad. Following the appropriate technology tradition and philosophy of technology as theoretical frameworks, this course examines practices of technology innovation and engineering design, and conceptions of human progress. The student develops skills in scientific reasoning and philosophy to be able to critique contemporary technological culture and compare alternative technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Mind, Consciousness, and Machines
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Mind, Consciousness, and Machines
Author: José Fernando Vega
Author: Anderson Brown
Author: Ana Nieves-Rosa
Abstract: Interdisciplinary study of the concept of “Intelligence” from the perspectives of Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Artificial Intelligence is studied in relation to an understanding of human intelligence, its meanings, the theories that support them, and other associated aspects, such as: learning, perception, memory, mind, brain, and consciousness, among others. The course includes laboratory demonstrations of existing Artificial Intelligence technologies, as well as class debates.
Year: 2012
Audience: Undergraduate


Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: Study of the origin and evolution of the universe, life, and thought from the perspectives of physics, biology, and philosophy. Students will explore the deep complexity of the universe and life through an introductory integrated examination of the dynamic process of evolution of three different objects: the Cosmos (with their fundamental constituents and natural laws), Life (from its origin to human beings), and Belief (from primitive cultures and ancient civilizations to present societies).
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Cosmology, Evolution, and Belief
Author: Matías Cafaro
Author: Matthew Landers
Author: Raúl Portuondo
Abstract: Study of the origin and evolution of the universe, life, and thought from the perspectives of physics, biology, and philosophy. Students will explore the deep complexity of the universe and life through an introductory integrated examination of the dynamic process of evolution of three different objects: the Cosmos (with their fundamental constituents and natural laws), Life (from its origin to human beings), and Belief (from primitive cultures and ancient civilizations to present societies).
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Guide for the Creation of Interdisciplinary, Team-taught Courses
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Guide for the Creation of Interdisciplinary, Team-taught Courses
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Dana L. Collins
Author: Nayda Santiago
Author: Lucas Avilés
Author: Roberto Seijo
Author: Héctor Jiménez
Abstract: Guide to requesting to teach an interdisciplinary, team-taught course. This guide was created in order to ensure the good implementation and continuation of the interdisciplinary, team-taught course format.
Year: 2016
Audience: Other


Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence
Author: Dana L. Collins
Author: Nayda Santiago
Author: Héctor Huyke
Author: Roberto Seijo
Author: Héctor Jiménez
Author: Lucas Avilés
Abstract: The Interdisciplinary Humanities Sequence is a sequence of five (5) courses that explore the enduring humanistic questions from diverse perspectives. Two of the courses are a study of Western Culture, while the remaining three courses are interdisciplinary, team-taught courses that consider the areas of artificial intelligence, alternative and appropriate technologies, and the origins of the universe.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Integrating Indigenous Identities
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Integrating Indigenous Identities
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Ann Olson
Abstract: This course, INDIG 4XX, functions as a culminating thematic course that complements, complicates and deepens previous courses taken in the NAIS Program. Additional pre-requisites ensure that students are prepared to engage with complex analysis and critical research essay writing formats. Placed in the fourth year, the course is the final “examination” of themes and community/research processes explored throughout the NAIS curriculum. The seminar format of this course limits the number of students to ensure full and deep engagement with the teaching and learning opportunities. True to the format of the FOUR KEY NAIS courses, INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS IDENTITIES (NAIS 4XX) will incorporate and interconnect both intergenerational research and community internships with major course themes. The course will be taught through a collaborative teaching model the goal of which is to enlist our NAIS Advisory Board members* to continue to work with our faculty in a reciprocal teaching and learning context.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Integrating_Indigenous_Identities.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Debra Rice
Abstract: This course explores indigenous women through the lens of gender, which is not defined biologically, but instead is shaped through social roles, political rules, and community expectations. It identifies the ways in which indigenous women’s’ personal and political experiences continue to impact agency and empowerment in both their personal and public lives. Course materials will explore historical and contemporary perspectives through Native American and Latino/a authors and scholars, as well as others, as the professor’s expertise and research allows. The primary focus, however, is on indigenous communities of Native North American/Canadian tribal groups, and Central and South American tribal/community groups.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Analyzing_Indigenous_Gender.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12


Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance
Author: Apanakhi Buckley
Abstract: American Cultural Dance emphasizes North American Indian dance traditions--- their performance and history. The course examines how dance is used as expression; how American Indian dance has been oppressed in the course of conquest, and how it has been used to resist oppression.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Dance.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12


Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Pamela Fabela
Author: Miles Miller
Abstract: Thanks to the former and current Yakama Nation Museum Directors: Pamela Fabela and Miles Miller for their contributions through dialogue and guidance. All courses in the certificate are transferable to the Native American and Indigenous Studies A.A. or B.A. Degree Programs. Because the student will encounter multiple and diverse “writing opportunities” ranging from brief exhibit descriptors to professional memos and letters to group research reports, pre-entry requirements for the program are a 100 level English Composition course and a Technical Writing course. As the outcomes indicate, students will be trained in critical areas of “museum management” honing entry level transferable skills welcome in any museum environment and/or applicable to special projects in cultural center environments.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Museum_Studies.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Secondary URL: http://plateauportal.wsulibs.wsu.edu/images/help_topic1.png
Secondary URL Description: "The Plateau Peoples' Web Portal is a gateway to Plateau peoples' cultural materials held in Washington State University's Libraries, Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections (MASC), the Museum of Anthropology and national donors including the National Anthropological Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institution. The materials in the portal have been chosen and curated by the tribes. Tribal administrators, working with their tribal governments, have provided information and their own additional materials to the portal as a means of expanding and extending the archival record" (Plateau People's Portal Introduction).
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate
Grant details: AC-50169-13
Title: Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Julio Carranza, J.D.
Author: Yakama Nation Chief Judge Ted Strong
Abstract: fjsfjapofapof
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Court_Advocacy.pdf
Audience: K - 12


Communication in the U.S.-Mexico Border Politics of Border Security and Popular Cultures and Mass Media
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Communication in the U.S.-Mexico Border Politics of Border Security and Popular Cultures and Mass Media
Author: Barrera Eduardo
Abstract: This course will analyze the different theories and approaches that have been used to understand and explain popular culture and mass media in the U.S.-México border. We will analyze how the policies behind border security have evolved and how they impact and circulate in popular culture and mass media. The course will start with an overview of the theoretical perspectives of the U.S,-México border. This will followed up by a section dealing with various conceptualizations of border identities and theoretical approaches to otherness. The third section will analyze the media systems in the area and the role of violence and development of security policies and their implementation.
Year: 1915
Audience: Graduate


Mapping the Line: Cultural Representations of Borderlands Security
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Mapping the Line: Cultural Representations of Borderlands Security
Author: Robert Gunn
Abstract: This course offers a long survey of cultural representations of the multiethnic geographical region understood now as the U.S./Mexico borderlands. How did the modern apparatus of the U.S./Mexico border come to be? What are the cultural practices, social understandings, and forms of economic traffic that both contribute to its enactment of national division and difference, and are in turn regulated by its legal enforcement of political inclusion and exclusion? And how might we fashion a critical dialogue that best negotiates enduring problems of democracy and difference, freedom and security, and regional autonomy within a transnational and multiethnic space that yet belongs to an increasingly integrated and borderless world? Examining historical clusters of texts that intersected public and private realms from the early 17th Century to the 21st Century, students will gain insight into these matters by investigating the multiple practices of social definition and political enforcement, national myth-making, and cultural boundary inscription that have contributed collectively to the construction of borderlands discourse over time. Guiding and informing this endeavor will be the development of an intellectual repertoire of critical methods through close engagement with a host of theoretical texts preponderantly from beyond the strict purview of literary and cultural studies as such, but which promise to foster sophisticated understandings of the traffic between varieties of cultural and political representation, including epic poetry, literary fiction, oral storytelling, government documents and treaties, travel narratives, diaries, letters, visual art, and film.
Year: 1915
Audience: Graduate


Discourses of Displacement: Citizenship, Sovereignty and Dissolution
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Discourses of Displacement: Citizenship, Sovereignty and Dissolution
Author: Lowry Martin
Abstract: Despite the contemporary narrative of globalization that pushes us to believe that we are moving towards a world citizenship that transcends regional and national loyalties, the paradox is that contemporary globalization has generated a proliferation of borders that impacts migratory movements, guides capitalist investment, and influences political life. Borderlands, whether historic or contemporary, have relied on various forms of legal logic to underpin their existence. This course looks at the laws, assumptions, and consequences of legal rulings in creating borders, classes and citizens. First, “Discourses of Displacement” will explore the idea of “borders” as a method that will allow us to explore new perspectives on the process of nation-building. We will question how the idea of borders invites us to reassess political concepts of citizenship, sovereignty, and the function of law as an equitable social mechanism. Lastly, we will simultaneously explore representations in literature and film of borders challenge us to reexamine our ideas about justice, citizenship, and the precariousness of national identity
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Fronteras y Seguridad Humana: narrativas sobre migración y violencia
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Fronteras y Seguridad Humana: narrativas sobre migración y violencia
Author: Maria Socorro Tabuenca
Abstract: En este curso se hará un análisis multidisciplinario de diversas narrativas de frontera, o de las zonas fronterizas (gente, cultura, etc.) entre México y Estados Unidos principalmente. En este curso se cubrirán ensayos de diversas disciplinas como historia, sociología, antropología, cultura, cine y literatura. En particular se estudiarán textos literarios y fílmicos en la producción de los siglos XX y XXI y el apoyo crítico contextual se dará a través de artículos o libros de las disciplinas mencionadas. Las actividades de la clase incluyen conferencias por parte de la profesora, presentaciones y discusiones de los estudiantes sobre las lecturas asignadas, “response papers” sobre algunas lecturas, proyectos individuales y en grupo, historias de vida, conferencias con investigadores expertos en la región, y presentaciones de películas dentro y fuera de clase.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Border crossings: Humanizing the History of the US-Mexico Border, 1880-2000
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Border crossings: Humanizing the History of the US-Mexico Border, 1880-2000
Author: Yolanda Leiva
Abstract: This graduate course explores the on-going creation of the US-Mexico border as well as the diverse ways in which migrants have negotiated crossing the US-Mexico border from the 1880s through the end of the 20th century. The dividing line was created following the US-Mexico War and the signing of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. As border scholars have argued, however, border making does not end with the creation of a border line. During the time period covered by this class, the border shifted from a relatively open border to one increasingly surveilled and controlled. Immigration laws such as the 1917 Immigration Act, the 1924 creation of the Border Patrol, and the implementation of operations such as Operation Hold the Line in 1993 and Operation Gatekeeper in 1994 hardened the borderline. Yet, unequal economic developments, US federal policies, as well as political and social instability have continued to motivate on-going movement across the border. The border and border crossers remain controversial today as they have for over a century. The course will combine historical analysis of the border with personal accounts, bringing a human face to this history.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Blood and Belonging: The Ethics of Membership and the Politics of Security Along the U.S.-Mexico Border
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: Blood and Belonging: The Ethics of Membership and the Politics of Security Along the U.S.-Mexico Border
Author: Ignacio Martinez
Abstract: This course will analyze the juncture between the historical and political evolution of the border and personal narrative in order to decipher the ways in which the rhetoric of belonging and border security intersect. This class advances the belief that in order to understand the policies behind border security we must utilize both a micro and macro approach, while looking at changes in policy over time and space. In order to provide the broadest possible perspective, therefore, this class will start with an inquiry into the global idea of security, its meaning and utility, and of the ethics of membership (i.e. policies of inclusion and exclusion).
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


The Children’s Story Hour: Narratives by and about Unaccompanied Children Crossing Borders in to U.S.
Grant details: AC-50195-14
Title: The Children’s Story Hour: Narratives by and about Unaccompanied Children Crossing Borders in to U.S.
Author: Kirsten Nigro
Abstract: The recent influx of unaccompanied children from Central America crossing into the United States illegally has shone a spotlight on a phenomenon that has a decades’, if not centuries’ long history.This course proposes to listen more carefully to the narratives told by and about immigrant children, in a variety of “textualities”: literature, drama, film, legal documents, human rights reports and charters, blog postings, transcripts of political debates, TV news clips. Whether framed as humanitarian, immigration or security crises, the stories of these children cross interdisciplinary borders for graduate-level research in border/national security and the humanities.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


An Anthropology of Graphic Medicine
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: An Anthropology of Graphic Medicine
Author: Juliet McMullin
Abstract: Course Description: The field of graphic medicine is a new and vibrant community of comics artists, humanities scholars, public health and health professionals. Graphic medicine is a term coined by physician, cartoonist, and medical humanities scholar Ian Williams and is defined as “the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of healthcare” (Graphicmedicine.org 2013). Williams launched the graphic medicine website in 2007 as an effort to recognize the increasing number of illness narratives in comic form since the mid 1990s. This class will take an anthropological lens to the field of graphic medicine and the graphic narratives that constitute the material of interest for GM. Examining the intersections of the “ordinary, chronic, and cruddy” and how they are entangled in biomedical hegemonies and medical technologies in the context of late liberalism, we will consider how graphic narratives are embedded in processes of biomedicalization, how the narratives are empowering or fostering conditions of endurance or exhaustion, and what anthropology and its methods can contribute to GM. Importantly, while the medium we are examining is visual, we are particularly interested in how graphic narratives intersect with scholarly conversations in the study of illness narratives and narrative medicine.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with the support of the NEH grant
Audience: Undergraduate


Life Narratives – Storytelling & the Power of Stories to Transform Thinking About the World
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Life Narratives – Storytelling & the Power of Stories to Transform Thinking About the World
Author: Tiffany Lopez
Abstract: COURSE OVERVIEW: This is the third quarter of the CHASS First Year Experience course sequence on “Life Narratives.” Our class focuses on storytelling and the power of stories to transform our thinking about the world with attention to matters of health and wellness for both individuals and society. The core questions: What is the foundation for effective storytelling? How do stories convey the importance of a problem or situation in a way that facts and data alone cannot? Why and how do stories create such a powerful sense of connection between storyteller and audience/community? How do we create stories that might inspire personal transformation and social change? How do we tailor storytelling for various realms (live performance, video, digital media)? How do we use storytelling to communicate scholarship and research? Ultimately, as a class, how will we create a storytelling event that shares the most important lessons gained from this year’s CHASS course sequence on the study of life narratives?
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with the support of the NEH can be found at this site.
Audience: Undergraduate


Race, Eugenics and Life Narratives in History: Understanding the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Race, Eugenics and Life Narratives in History: Understanding the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis
Author: Dana Simmons
Abstract: Our objective this quarter is to dig into the history of race, eugenics and medicine in modern history. We will use a case study or microhistory method, whereby we will seek to deeply understand one historical event as a window onto broader contexts and questions. Our focus is the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis, which took place in Macon County, Alabama from 1932-1972. This will not be an ordinary history class. The core of the quarter will be a game: a simulation of a civil lawsuit filed in federal court in 1974 by surviving study subjects and their descendents. The first few class sessions will be devoted to understanding the historical context of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study: eugenics, racial science and racism. Then the game begins: each of us will be assigned a role to play in the simulation, and we will speak, write and make decisions in that character. Each party in the lawsuit will attempt to convince the jury and the public to decide in its favor. The outcome may or may not replicate what really happened, as we will see at the game’s end. However, the goal is not to recreate history. Rather, it is to fully immerse our selves in these peoples’ lives, their choices, their values and the world they moved in.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: Syllabi developed with support of the NEH can be found on this site.
Audience: Undergraduate


Powerwriting for Medical Students
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: Powerwriting for Medical Students
Author: Goldberry Long
Abstract: Increased concern for the emotional component of doctoring has led to a revival in medical schools’ inclusion of the humanities into their curriculum. With the intention of fostering empathy, many medical schools offer reflective writing as a 3rd-year selective. Although this has shown some positive outcomes, reflective writing requires complex writing skills that many students lack. Educators may assume that students can write easily and fluently about their emotions, but such writing is a skill, not a given. Brief and late writing interventions limit success to those already inclined to the activity. Further, by focusing solely on empathy, such programs ignore the potential power of writing as a multifaceted cognitive tool. This paper will present an ongoing curriculum intervention that is aimed at fully exploiting the potential of writing to develop observational, analytical, and other cognitive skills. The program we designed, a 3-year writing program for medical students, fully integrates writing into the curriculum. This mandatory program introduces an innovative writing technique called Powerwriting to first-year students, when they use it as they learn patient documentation. During their second and third years, students use writing toward recognizing biases and long-term consequences of treatment plans. By the third year, all students are ready to use Powerwriting to reflect on difficult events, such as the deaths of patients. Moving in a scaffolded curriculum, from information processing to critical analysis to reflective exploration, our approach gives students a powerful writing tool for processing all kinds of information, from humanistic to medical.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mednarratives.com/research/syllabi-medical-narrative-in-humanities-social-sciences-and-arts/
Primary URL Description: All syllabi developed with support of the NEH can be found at this site.
Audience: Other


The Body in Western Art: Antiquity to Present
Grant details: AC-50204-14
Title: The Body in Western Art: Antiquity to Present
Author: Jeanette Kohl
Abstract: This course introduces students to vital questions on the role of the human body and face in Western Art, from Antiquity to the present. It addresses the per se interdisciplinary nature of body images, profane and sacred, in different media and art forms, thus familiarizing students with a broad range of subjects,artworks, and cultural practices and thought patterns. Its chronologically arranged themes foster both the students' sense of historical differences and developments as well as changing notions of the human body and its 'meanings' - from the visceral to the virtual, as metaphor and matter, and as subject and object in visual representation. The course familiarizes students with central ideas of what it means to be human, beyond the Cartesian dichotomy of body and mind, and it will help them to critically evaluate the intellectual and cultural concepts behind different forms of body images. The course is art historical but also includes interdisciplinary components and overlaps with Religious Studies, Theatre Studies, History and the History of Medicine, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Psychology.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


OS207 Oral History Methods
Grant details: AD-50029-11
Title: OS207 Oral History Methods
Author: Valoree Gagnon
Abstract: In Oral History Methods, students learn how to conduct oral history projects, including practical, historical, legal, and ethical aspects. They will also explore why oral history is used in tribal, community, and academic settings, and consider its advantages and drawbacks compared to other historical methods.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Grant details: AD-50036-12
Title: MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Author: J. Craig Tompkins
Author: Jessie Ryker-Crawford
Abstract: Course Description: Digital technologies are cultural constructs and therefore can be purposefully used to transform our methods of relating and transmitting humanities content and culture to our audiences and to future generations. Instead of allowing digital technologies to shape our cultures and identity, we can shape our digital tools to better preserve, present, inform, and sustain our cultural heritages...the Software Applications for the Digital Humanities Special Topics course will introduce students to the use of emerging digital technologies in the archiving and presentation/display of cultural, visual, material, and intellectual property. Students will explore innovative ways in which digital technologies can be adapted to interact with cultural objects, such as creating condition reports of the objects. This course will engage key humanities content areas, including conservation, archives, Native American studies, and museum history.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/s/w9628865bxbqe2h/Software%20Applications%20Fall%202012%20Syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Syllabus - MUSM370 Software Applications for the Digital Humanities
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


MUSM370d Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Grant details: AD-50036-12
Title: MUSM370d Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Author: Jessie Ryker-Crawford
Author: J. Craig Tompkins
Abstract: Through a review of current trends in public accessible cultural property database systems and websites, students will critique the pros and cons of emerging digital technologies utilized in the archiving, presentation and display of culturally-based visual, material and intellectual property.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: https://www.dropbox.com/s/68k4nnqs9welqg4/Cultural%20Representation%202013%20Spring%20Syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Syllabus - Cultural Representation in the Digital Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Comanche Centered Education
Grant details: AD-50040-12
Title: Comanche Centered Education
Author: Juanita Pahdopony
Author: Phyllis Narcomey
Author: Jimmy Arteberry
Author: Dorna Riding In-Battese
Abstract: These curricular materials support Comanche Nation College's mission to provide a 'Comanche Centered Education'. There are two components: lectures with accompanying PowerPoint, handouts, and audio recordings. Lecture topics include: Comanche Sacred Sites, Comanche Plant Use, Cedar Lesson, and Oral History by Maddische. The second component is a Comanche (Numunuu) Scrabble game designed to support learning Comanche language.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: "History of Science"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Syllabus: "History of Science"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Florence Hsia, Ph.D.
Author: Emily Redman, Ph.D.
Abstract: This is the most recent iteration of the syllabus for the project course, "History of Science." It is based on the syllabus created for the implementation semester (Fall 2018), but includes minor changes from the course's second run in Fall 2019.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/history-of-science-sample-syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the syllabus in PDF format on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: https://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click on "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Paper Assignment: "Lab Reports through Time"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Paper Assignment: "Lab Reports through Time"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Florence Hsia, Ph.D.
Author: Emily Hamilton, Ph.D.
Abstract: This paper assignment integrates one of the labs from the Scientific Revolution unit (Galileo's Inclined Plane Experiment) with lecture and discussion of the changing cultural styles and values in experimentation during the 16th and 17th centuries. First, students reproduce the inclined plane experiment under historical conditions that Galileo would have faced. Then they write up the lab report in three styles: (1) based on Galileo's model from his "Two Chief World Systems" (1632); (2) based on an experimental report that Robert Boyle published in his "Philosophical Transactions" in 1667; and (3) in the style of a standard present-day physical lab report. Finally students reflect on what changing conventions and formats of lab report can tell us about the cultural history of experimentation.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/paper-1-lab-reports-through-time.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the assignment on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab for "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: "Beyond Henrietta Lacks: Race and Medicine in 20th Century America"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Syllabus: "Beyond Henrietta Lacks: Race and Medicine in 20th Century America"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Susan Lederer, Ph.D.
Author: Liliana Busconi, Ph.D.
Abstract: This is a sample version of the syllabus for the project course, "Beyond Henrietta Lacks." It is based on the syllabus created in 2018 for the implementation semester (Spring 2019).
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/beyond-henrietta-lacks-sample-syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the syllabus on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks."
Audience: Undergraduate


Paper Assignment: "History of a Treatment: Development, Testing, Marketing, and Usage"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Paper Assignment: "History of a Treatment: Development, Testing, Marketing, and Usage"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Susan Lederer, Ph.D.
Author: Liliana Busconi, Ph.D.
Abstract: This assignment is modeled after the work done in Wailoo and Pemberton, "The Troubled Dream of Genetic Medicine" (2006). It involves students choosing/identifying a disease or condition, researching the science behind a treatment and exploring the cultural identity associated with this disease or condition. Students write and submit a paper and create a poster for a poster session that happens in lab at the end of the semester. The poster session is designed to emulate a biomedical conference.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://dean-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/resources/sample-paper-poster-assignment-history-of-a-treatm.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the assignment on the project's permanent website.
Secondary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanititesgrant
Secondary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click on the tab: "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Audience: Undergraduate


Three Sample Learning Modules from "History of Science"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Three Sample Learning Modules from "History of Science"
Author: David Brandon Dennis, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Abstract: The project's permanent website hosts three sample learning modules from "History of Science." These modules are (1) Early Modern "Big Science" & Spanish Empire Mapmaking; (2) 17th Century Cultures of Experimentation: Galileo vs. Boyle; and (3) The Race to Discover DNA's Structure. The website provides a narrative description of how lecture and lab are integrated, a lab manual, lecture materials and activities, as well as bibliographies for each module. We intend these to be open educational resources (OERs) for the teachers and students at other institutions to use.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.dean.edu/academics/innovation-in-teaching/national-endowment-for-the-humanities-grant/humanities-grant/
Primary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab: "Sample Course Materials: History of Science"
Audience: Undergraduate


Three Sample Learning Modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Grant details: AE-256242-17
Title: Three Sample Learning Modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks"
Author: R.A. Lawson, Ph.D.
Author: Jessica M. Pisano, Ph.D.
Abstract: The project's permanent website hosts three sample learning modules from "Beyond Henrietta Lacks." These modules are (1) Human Classification in the Enlightenment; (2) Race, Slavery, and Spirometry; and (3) Henrietta Lacks, HeLa Cells, and Bioethics. The website provides a narrative description of how lecture and lab are integrated, a lab manual, lecture materials and activities, as well as bibliographies for each module. We intend these to be open educational resources (OERs) for the teachers and students at other institutions to use.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://www.dean.edu/humanitiesgrant
Primary URL Description: Link to the project's permanent website. Click the tab: "Sample Course Materials: Beyond Henrietta Lacks."
Audience: Undergraduate


First-Year Experience Curricular Materials
Grant details: AE-264001-19
Title: First-Year Experience Curricular Materials
Author: Lori Coggins
Author: Deanna Cooper
Abstract: The materials, located among supplementary materials, include four lessons associated with the common book Redeployment.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Teaching Frago to Developmental Reading Students
Grant details: AE-264001-19
Title: Teaching Frago to Developmental Reading Students
Author: Vickie Robison
Abstract: These materials discuss how to incorporate Phil Klay's short story with a developmental reading classroom. The materials are within the supplementary materials.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Jason Hale: Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Grant details: AE-264030-19
Title: Jason Hale: Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Author: Jason Hale
Abstract: A presentation on the contemporary Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation of Kansas.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://canvas.jccc.edu/courses/29658/files?preview=3228068
Audience: Other


Sean M. Daley: Contemporary American Indians 101
Grant details: AE-264030-19
Title: Sean M. Daley: Contemporary American Indians 101
Author: Sean M. Daley
Abstract: A presentation on the basics of contemporary American Indians, including demography, cultural and social issues, political status, and economic concerns.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://canvas.jccc.edu/courses/29658/files/3183103?module_item_id=734096
Audience: Other


Sustainability Certificate Proposal
Grant details: AK-255344-17
Title: Sustainability Certificate Proposal
Author: Christoffer Lammer-Heindel
Author: Benjamin Darr
Abstract: Proposal to establish the Sustainability Certificate credential and course identification. Submitted to Loras College's Academic Council in November 2017.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://buildingecoliteracy.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/ac-certificate-proposal.pdf
Primary URL Description: PDF of Academic Council Proposal
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP121: Communicating Globally and Locally
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP121: Communicating Globally and Locally
Author: Jessica Despain
Abstract: a syllabus for the entry-level, skills-based course in the Digital Community Engagement Pathway. The course emphasizes multi-modal writing, systems thinking, and problem mapping.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to the sample syllabi created during the grant period.
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP123: Research and Systems Thinking
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP123: Research and Systems Thinking
Author: Jen Cline
Abstract: A sample syllabus for the second-semester required research methods courses for the Digital Community Engagement Pathway.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to the sample syllabi on the Digital Community Engagement Pathway website.
Audience: Undergraduate


DCEP221: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Scientific Method
Grant details: AKA-260418-18
Title: DCEP221: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Scientific Method
Author: Michael Hankins
Abstract: A sample syllabus for the third-semester core skills-based corse in the Digital Community Engagement Pathway emphasizing interdisciplinary approaches to the scientific method.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://iris.siue.edu/pathway/syllabi/
Primary URL Description: Link to sample syllabi on the Digital Community Engagement Pathway website.
Audience: Undergraduate


Course syllabus
Grant details: AKA-260488-18
Title: Course syllabus
Author: Ju Shen, Ph.D.
Abstract: Document is a course syllabus for an advanced computer science course (Interactive Media) that integrates humanities contents and methods of inquiry. Course was revised in connection with this NEH planning grant.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Envs 350/Eng 302- Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Grant details: AKA-260489-18
Title: Envs 350/Eng 302- Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Author: Patrick Hurley
Author: Jon Volkmer
Abstract: In addition to regular in-class work, this course includes experiential or outdoor components built into the class, a series of associated methods assignments, and one, weekend stewardship activitiy. Our outdoor activities and stewardship will offer you the opportunity to engage with different scientific, social scientific, and humanities forms of engagement with the landscapes, ecosystems, and species that characterize southeastern Pennsylvania’s Anthropocene “mixed settlements,” while providing you the opportunity to match the theory of our readings with the practice of studying these complex places. In short, these are the moments and places where you will have the chance to “ground-truth” our understandings of the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will ask you to engage in original data collection of diverse kinds and interpretive analysis. By the end of the semester, we will ask you to develop your own narrative of what the Anthropocene is and what it means to people living in our region.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Envs 350/Engl 302, Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Grant details: AKA-260489-18
Title: Envs 350/Engl 302, Writing and Mapping the Anthropocene
Author: Patrick Hurley
Author: Jon Volkmer
Abstract: In addition to regular in-class work, this course includes experiential or outdoor components built into the class, a series of associated methods assignments, and one, weekend stewardship activitiy. Our outdoor activities and stewardship will offer you the opportunity to engage with different scientific, social scientific, and humanities forms of engagement with the landscapes, ecosystems, and species that characterize southeastern Pennsylvania’s Anthropocene “mixed settlements,” while providing you the opportunity to match the theory of our readings with the practice of studying these complex places. In short, these are the moments and places where you will have the chance to “ground-truth” our understandings of the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will ask you to engage in original data collection of diverse kinds and interpretive analysis. By the end of the semester, we will ask you to develop your own narrative of what the Anthropocene is and what it means to people living in our region
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kERnsy9ra6KxPeySFABn1ocXzeA0W3Yhx2TQ6dqaYTQ/edit
Primary URL Description: Google Drive link to Envs 350/Engl 302 Syllabus
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Islam Freshmen Cluster syllabi
Grant details: AKA-265761-19
Title: Global Islam Freshmen Cluster syllabi
Author: Asma Sayeed, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Author: Christine Chism, Ph.D., UCLA Department of English
Author: Jeffrey Guhin, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Sociology
Author: Susan Slyomovics, Ph.D., UCLA Depts. of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Abstract: Islam is an immensely diverse global tradition, the second largest religion. The course sequence offers a study of Islam and Muslims within a framework of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across the world. Students exam Islam's evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity--when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia--to modern era where it is practice from US to Indonesia. The sequence concentrates on broad analytical categories in the study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history and case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Islam Freshmen Cluster
Grant details: AKA-265761-19
Title: Global Islam Freshmen Cluster
Author: Asma Sayeed, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Author: Christine Chism, Ph.D., UCLA Department of English
Author: Jeffrey Guhin, Ph.D., UCLA Department of Sociology
Author: Susan Slyomovics, Ph.D., UCLA Depts. of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Abstract: Islam is an immensely diverse global tradition, the second largest religion. The course sequence offers a study of Islam and Muslims within a framework of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across the world. Students exam Islam's evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity--when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia--to modern era where it is practice from US to Indonesia. The sequence concentrates on broad analytical categories in the study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history and case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://ucla.in/3fQRyPi
Audience: Undergraduate


CRJ 211 Law Enforcement
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: CRJ 211 Law Enforcement
Author: Kim Carr
Abstract: This course will chronicle the history, development, philosophy and current status of law enforcement. Topics will include an examination of law enforcement agencies, identifying most important characteristics of city, state, and federal police work. Analysis of police problems, and the processes of justice and constitutional limitations on law enforcement will also be discussed in the course. Further, when this course is part of a learning community , experiential learning activities will apply recognized ethical principles to ethical dilemmas in law enforcement.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: Social Issues in Policing a Multicultural Community
Author: Tim McCorry
Abstract: This course is designed to develop a heightened awareness and sensitivity to the social and ethical issues that arise when policing in a multicultural society. Specifically, the course will examine the history and development of municipal policing. It will also review the philosophical and theoretical perspectives of community and problem-oriented approaches addressing the legal and ethical issues associated with applying these models in a real-world, multicultural context.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Grant details: AKB-260415-18
Title: PHI 310 Ethics with Criminal Justice Applications
Author: Jerry Erion
Abstract: This course highlights the vital role of moral philosophy in exploring deep ethical questions in criminal justice. What is the right thing to do? And what are the elements of good character? In the spirit of applied philosophy, the course will engage these types of questions while also introducing significant connections to important criminal justice issues. Topics include logic and critical thinking concepts that are central to the philosophical method as well as ethical theories that can ground the composition and evaluation of a wide range of ethical arguments.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus for Materials Matter
Grant details: AKB-260492-18
Title: Syllabus for Materials Matter
Author: Pamela Smart
Author: Hilary Becker
Author: Louis Piper
Author: Mark Poliks
Author: Valerie Imbruce
Abstract: Course outline and class schedule
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/open?id=121jmR7dLhSYFEDp2nUi7vOuZxK6_B_Pj
Primary URL Description: This URL is a link to our syllabus on Google Drive. I would be glad to upload the document itself, if that is possible.
Audience: Undergraduate


Spatial Effects: Places for Healing and Well-being
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Spatial Effects: Places for Healing and Well-being
Author: Atsuko Sakai
Abstract: The places we inhabit everyday are mostly invisible for the majority of people. Unless we provide an opportunity to observe and analyze them—our surroundings are generally taken for granted much like breathing air. Most people do not realize that our surroundings and how they are designed can affect our daily functions and behavior— often unconsciously, and that good design can contribute in a positive way to our feelings and healing because the ultimate goal of spatial design is the embodiment of human experience. In this course, we will start with phenomenology of architecture, and then we will apply these concepts to spatial designs for care, healing, and well-being. The course consists of five critical themes: 1) Design Philosophy; 2) Neuroscience and Architecture; 3) Places for Healing in a Global Context; 4) Places for Well-being in a Local Context; and 5) Design Thinking - Design Processes for Improving our Surroundings.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Narrative Medicine
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Narrative Medicine
Author: Lindy Davidson
Abstract: Medical institutions rely heavily on lists in order to communicate with and about patients (Browning, 1992), yet Arthur Frank (1995) says that patients find their way through illness by telling their stories. In order to improve understanding about patients’ perspectives of health and illness, their stories must be reclaimed from the diagnostic lists and treatments that dominate patient identities. As medical schools begin to select students based not only on their scientific acumen but also their understanding of the humanities, they are recognizing what Rita Charon (2008) states: Along with their growing scientific expertise, doctors need the expertise to listen to their patients, to understand as best they can the ordeals of illness, to honor the meanings of their patients’ narratives of illness, and to be moved by what they behold so that they can act on their patients’ behalf (p. 3). In addition to aiding in their treatment of patients, narrative medicine offers a means for medical practitioners to reflect on difficult cases by exploring their emotions and personal challenges in a career that is marked by significant stress (Roscoe, 2012). Students will read illness narratives and the theoretical background of narrative medicine, develop their own personal narratives of health and illness, and work with others to narrativize their illness experiences.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Masculinities, Health, & (Dis)Order
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Masculinities, Health, & (Dis)Order
Author: Holly Singh
Abstract: This course centers on how masculinities influence health behaviors, outcomes, and ethical debates in the contemporary world, introducing and drawing on methods of inquiry, discovery, and knowledge creation from the social and behavioral sciences. Topics will include: making gender and gendered bodies; sexuality and changing gender roles; family and male honor; men's health; and masculinities in religion, nationalism, violence, and global commerce.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Health, Healing, and Everyday Crises in Southeast Asia
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Health, Healing, and Everyday Crises in Southeast Asia
Author: Holly Singh
Abstract: Using regions in the Majority World as sites of study, this course explores how the interconnectedness of diverse spaces, places, and peoples constitute community. Through the examination of locales, historical periods, and the people who inhabit them, students will take an interdisciplinary approach to the relationships between the local, regional and global.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Acquisition of Knowledge: Medical Humanities in a Global Context
Grant details: AKB-265735-19
Title: Acquisition of Knowledge: Medical Humanities in a Global Context
Author: Atsuko Sakai
Author: Benjamin Young
Abstract: Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, independent research, studio experiences, and assignments, this course will explore the meaning and value of interdisciplinary inquiry for the cultivation of practical wisdom in our personal and civic lives.Unlike our typical AOK classes, this class focuses on a specific theme, Medical Humanities (MH). DSS 1-MHGC:Why Study Medical Humanities? DSS 2-MHGC:Introducing Medical Humanities: History & Concept DSS 3-MHGC:Exploring Philosophical Approaches DSS 4-MHGC:Eudaimonia: Human Well-being beyond the Absence of Illness DSS 5-MHGC:Theory & Practice: Making Art Accessible to People DSS 6-MHGC:Theory & Practice: Observing & Making Sense DSS 7-MHGC:Problem Solving: Architecture & Design DSS 8-MHGC:Existential Case Study: Judgment & Context DSS 9-MHGC:Existential Case Study: Stories DSS 10-MHGC:Conclusion: Medical Humanities in a Global Context Medical Humanities (DSS) sessions will include specific cases and stories along with additional resources for your reference. Therefore, the course-preparation materials for Medical Humanities are multi-faceted, which is intended to help you explore different types of, ideas about, and approaches to Medical Humanities within a limited timeframe. Ultimately, you should be able to provide your own answer to the question “What are Medical Humanities?” and at the end of the semester you might discover areas within the field of Medical Humanities you would be interested in when considering your Medical Humanities pathway at the Honors College.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus: What Is a Criminal?
Grant details: AQ-228955-15
Title: Syllabus: What Is a Criminal?
Author: Katherine Gaudet
Abstract: Criminals are people who break the law -- In theory. How do people become criminals (with regard to biological, cultural, and economic influences)? What happens to them in the criminal justice system, and how does the system shape the definition of "criminal"? We will also discuss "criminals of conscience" from Thoreau and Gandhi to Edward Snowden. The course will emphasize reading but will also engage with other media, including films, podcasts, and visual art.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus for "What is Happiness?"
Grant details: AQ-248180-16
Title: Syllabus for "What is Happiness?"
Author: Matthew Meyer
Author: Kristin Schaupp
Abstract: This syllabus is the product of multiple iterations of our Enduring Questions grant course entitled "What is Happiness? A multidisciplinary and multicultural approach." It was intended for a class size of 30-50 and as a general course without any prerequisites.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1748v6xkKX_i99OvDplRN3gnNZq-Ub8Tf/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: This is a link to a Google drive file of the syllabus.
Audience: Undergraduate


What is the Meaning of Work and Leisure?
Grant details: AQ-248310-16
Title: What is the Meaning of Work and Leisure?
Author: Jon K. Burmeister
Abstract: We spend much of our lives working, or preparing ourselves to work. We spend much of the rest of our time pursuing leisure. But what are our goals in doing so? How important is it for our work to be meaningful? Is leisure simply the absence of work, or something more? And what role do each of these play in a fulfilling life? This course will work to respond to these questions through the lenses of philosophy, sociology, religion, and economics. We will examine conceptions of work ranging from the idea that it is a necessary evil to the idea that it is a form of religious devotion. We will consider conceptions of leisure ranging from the view that it consists of relaxation, to the view that it is an activity one cannot engage in without prior self-development. From Aristotle to Adam Smith, from Martin Luther to Max Weber, we will study various accounts of what work and leisure have been, and what their ideal forms might be. The course will conclude by considering the coming age of technologically automated physical and mental labor, and its impact on the future of work and leisure.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://workandleisure.org/
Audience: Undergraduate


"Cosmos or Chaos? Views of the World, Views of the Good Life" syllabus
Grant details: AQ-50057-09
Title: "Cosmos or Chaos? Views of the World, Views of the Good Life" syllabus
Author: Laurence Cooper, Professor of Political Science, Carleton College
Abstract: A syllabus for a freshman seminar on philosophical views on the "good life." There is no question more important to us than the question of how we should live, or the question of the good life. Everything we do, however grand or petty, ultimately stems from our answer to the question of the good life. Yet if the question of the good life is the most basic of practical questions, it still rests on prior conceptions, or answers to prior questions—and one question perhaps more than any other: what is the fundamental character of the world?
Year: 2012
Primary URL: https://apps.carleton.edu/curricular/posc/assets/100F12.pdf
Primary URL Description: PDF version of the syllabus
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


What is the Nature of the Cosmos
Grant details: AQ-50223-10
Title: What is the Nature of the Cosmos
Author: J.B. Shank
Abstract: J.B. Shank was awarded the Morse Alumni Association Award for Distinguished contributions to Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota, and his awarded celebrated in particular his NEH funded course on "The Nature of the Cosmos."
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.scholarswalk.umn.edu/awards/aoce/pdf/2016/Shank-poster.pdf
Audience: Undergraduate


Syllabus for "What is Time?"
Grant details: AQ-50254-10
Title: Syllabus for "What is Time?"
Author: Jessie Fillerup
Abstract: This syllabus provides a list of topics, course materials, assignments, and policies for the NEH-supported course, "What is Time?"
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://music.richmond.edu/faculty/jfilleru/
Primary URL Description: The URL is a faculty webpage. The syllabus may be found under the "Grants" link.
Audience: K - 12


English 291: What Is Racial Difference?
Grant details: AQ-50712-12
Title: English 291: What Is Racial Difference?
Author: Cord J. Whitaker
Abstract: Is Race a modern problem? Is it medieval? Is it ancient? Is Race visual? Is it textual? Is it scientific? Is it religious? Is Race real? Is it imaginary? Is Race nothing? Is Race everything? These and similar questions inform readings, discussion, and writing in English 291. Together, we explore the nature of race from classical antiquity through modern day in philosophy, science, art, and literature. Together, we explore the variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of race. We also consider the historical, social, and economic pressures that have consolidated the idea of race. Together, we ask: what is racial difference? The course is divided into four units, reflecting three major elements of racial discourse: physical difference, geographical difference, and religious difference, along with a unit dedicated to our main objective: to develop a working definition of race.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://whatisracialdifference.com
Audience: Undergraduate


What is civility?
Grant details: AQ-50761-12
Title: What is civility?
Author: Ann Hartle
Abstract: Tentative syllabus for course on civility includes Aristotle's Ethics and Politics, Pieper's Leisure the Basis of Culture, Montaigne's Essays, Oakeshott's On Human Conduct, Shils's The Virtue of Civility.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


What does prayer do?
Grant details: AQ-50860-13
Title: What does prayer do?
Author: Karmen MacKendrick
Author: Jennifer A. Glancy
Abstract: The monk, the poet, the neuroscientist, the constitutional lawyer—all hear the question what does prayer do from their own perspectives. Students will approach this enduring question from multiple disciplinary perspectives, including theology, philosophy, religious studies, medicine, the social sciences, law, and the arts. Readings will be chosen from major wisdom traditions, with some emphasis on Christian examples.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.whatdoesprayerdo.net
Primary URL Description: Website designed to support teaching of course, What does prayer do?
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGLISH 4931: Cultural Preservation
Grant details: AQ-50920-13
Title: ENGLISH 4931: Cultural Preservation
Author: Gerry Canavan
Abstract: This is the Marquette University undergraduate course developed by the Enduring Questions grant. It was taught two times as a special topics course in the English department, in Spring 2014 and Spring 2015; the plan now is to make it a permanent part of the English bulletin under the revised name "Material Cultures"
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://mucp2015.wordpress.com
Primary URL Description: This is the course site for the second offering of the course (Spring 2015).
Secondary URL: http://muculturalpreservation.wordpress.com
Secondary URL Description: This is the course site for the first offering of the course (Spring 2014).
Audience: Undergraduate


Course: NEH Enduring Questions Course: Cultural and Scientific Understandings of Empathy
Grant details: AQ-51021-14
Title: Course: NEH Enduring Questions Course: Cultural and Scientific Understandings of Empathy
Author: Margarete Landwehr
Abstract: Since May 2014 through November 2014, I read most of the readings and secondary literature required for this new course. The course syllabus has been submitted to the West Chester University curriculum committee and has just been approved. It is scheduled to be taught in Spring 2015 and in Fall 2015 (as an Honors Course), as per the schedule in my NEH proposal. Since September 2014, a West Chester University student has created a website and is scanning course readings onto the website. Additional preparatory reading will be completed in December 2014 and January 2015.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


2016 Echoes of War Discussion Leaders Training Journal
Grant details: AV-248453-16
Title: 2016 Echoes of War Discussion Leaders Training Journal
Author: Minnesota Humanities Center's Echoes of War scholar team
Abstract: With the help of outstanding scholars and leading voices from Minnesota’s Veteran communities, the Humanities Center’s 2016 Echoes of War project included an immersive experience to train 10 NEH Discussion Leaders to lead public discussions in Saint Paul and Northfield, Minnesota. This is the comprehensive Discussion Leaders Training Journal developed for the training. The contents include a welcome letter for the Humanities Center’s President & CEO, overview description and Humanities Center’s approach, funding credit, list of discussion leaders, list of scholar team and key staff, descriptions and sessions schedule for each of the six training days, journal and note pages for each day, and a bibliography of assigned readings.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://humanitieslearning.org/resource/index.cfm?act=1&TagID=0&CatID=0&SearchText=echoes&SortBy=1&mediatype=0&lurl=1
Primary URL Description: This comprehensive Discussion Leaders Training Journal was developed for the Humanities Center’s 2016 Echoes of War project.
Audience: General Public


Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual
Grant details: AV-248477-16
Title: Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual
Author: Rayneard, Max
Abstract: Planting the Oar seeks to bridge the divide between veterans and civilians by facilitating discussion between them around great literary texts that examine civilian / veteran relations. The Planting the Oar Discussion Group Manual has two purposes: 1) To provide context and guidance for the texts discussed in Planting the Oar Discussion Groups 2) to prepare participants so they will arrive at discussion groups having given thought to the literary texts they have read and they questions they give rise to. The manual provides facilitates discussion on the following subjects: Week 1 - What is a Veteran? / What is a Civilian? Week 2 and 3 - The Odyssey Week 4 - Othello Week 5 - The poetry of Wilfred Owen Week 6 and 7 - The Things They Carried Week 8 - The script of Telling: Orlando Each week is divided into three sections. 1) provides a rationale for the inclusion of the text in the Planting the Oar curriculum, a brief overview of history, context, and aesthetic forms of the text, and where relevant, a very broad overview of the plot and characters in the text. 2) Open ended free-writing prompts meant to facilitate discussion 3) A selection of key quotations from the text, as well as prompts for discussion
Year: 2017
Primary URL: thetellingproject.org/planting-the-oar
Primary URL Description: Provides more information on Planting the Oar, as well as contact details of the author.
Audience: General Public


Memoirs of War: Vietnam to Afghanistan
Grant details: AV-248478-16
Title: Memoirs of War: Vietnam to Afghanistan
Author: Jennifer L. Andersen
Abstract: This is a new graduate seminar which I will be teaching to English M.A. students in spring 2017. I am also seeking funding to support service learning opportunities for students in the course, where students would lead literature discussions for veterans and civilians at local libraries.
Year: 2016
Primary URL Description: spring 2017 courses are not yet listed on the CSUSB electronic class schedule.
Audience: Graduate


Telling the Story: A Book Group for Veterans
Grant details: AV-248494-16
Title: Telling the Story: A Book Group for Veterans
Author: Maine Humanities Council and schloars
Abstract: Syllabuses created for the groups held from February–September 2017
Year: 2017
Audience: Other


Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on the Military Graphic Novel
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on the Military Graphic Novel
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Kathleen Dale, PhD
Abstract: The discussion group series is purposefully designed to provide Veterans the time and support to reflect on and discuss experiences with war and moral injury. This 5-week program combines the graphic novel genre with contemporary war poetry as an entry point for difficult moral and spiritual dialogues. Max Uriarte’s novel, The White Donkey, is the main source. Each week is organized around a 90-minute session, beginning with a collective reading of sections from the novel and followed by semi-structured questions facilitated by a leader. Please see the accompanying Discussion Leader Guide for this Warriors Path series.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.katinkahooyer.org/ux-portfolio/war-and-reclaiming-the-soul/
Primary URL Description: This website is the project director's portfolio site and provides information on the Warriors Path Discussion Series, 2018-2019, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities Dialogues on the Experience War program.
Secondary URL: https://mcw.academia.edu/KatinkaHooyer/Syllabi-and-Curriculums
Secondary URL Description: This website is an online curriculum vitae and knowledge-sharing site for academics. The Warriors Path syllabi and discussion guides are located on the project director’s site.
Audience: Other


Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on Shakespeare’s Historical Plays
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Warriors Path: War, Moral Injury and Reclaiming the Soul, Discussion Series on Shakespeare’s Historical Plays
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Nancy Smith-Watson
Author: Jim Tasse
Abstract: The discussion group series is purposefully designed to provide Veterans the time and support to reflect on and discuss experiences with war and moral injury. This 5-week program combines the scenes from Shakespeare’s plays with contemporary war poetry as an entry point for difficult moral and spiritual dialogues. Scenes from Coriolanus, Henry V, Henry IV, and Henry VI are the main sources. Each week is organized around a 90-minute session, beginning with a collective reciting of scenes, with lines from the scenes fed to participants. This scenework is followed by semi-structured questions facilitated by a leader. Please see the accompanying Discussion Leader Guide for this Warriors Path series.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.katinkahooyer.org/ux-portfolio/war-and-reclaiming-the-soul/
Primary URL Description: This website is the project director’s portfolio site and provides information on the Warriors Path Discussion Series, 2018-2019, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities Dialogues on the Experience War program.
Secondary URL: https://mcw.academia.edu/KatinkaHooyer/Syllabi-and-Curriculums
Secondary URL Description: This website is an online curriculum vitae and knowledge-sharing site.
Audience: Other


Heroics in the Military Context
Grant details: AV-260595-18
Title: Heroics in the Military Context
Author: Katinka Hooyer, PhD
Author: Zeno Franco, PhD
Author: Jenny Plevin
Abstract: This series of short videos addresses society’s moral responsibility to warfighters, what it means to serve above and beyond the call of duty in the military context, the notion of heroism as a "redemptive" act, and the relationship of heroics and moral injury.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://vimeo.com/docuwm
Primary URL Description: doc|UWM is the documentary media center in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Peck School of the Arts' Department of Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres which bridges academics with real world experience and gives students the unique opportunity to work on professional productions. Students and affiliated faculty collaborate on short-form videos that raise awareness about a variety of contemporary political and social issues as well as feature-length documentaries for public television broadcast
Audience: Undergraduate


War and Healing Participant Guidebook
Grant details: AV-260657-18
Title: War and Healing Participant Guidebook
Author: Jessica L. Adler and Brahim Almarales
Abstract: This is the participant guidebook for the War and Healing program, which took place in Miami, Florida in 2018-2019. Distributed to program participants at the beginning of each discussion series, it contains an explanation of the program, reading lists, and reading excerpts.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://historyofhealth.fiu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/WHParticGuideLargeF.pdf
Audience: General Public


War and Healing: A Century of Veterans Reintegration [Participant Guidebook]
Grant details: AV-260657-18
Title: War and Healing: A Century of Veterans Reintegration [Participant Guidebook]
Author: Jessica L. Adler
Author: Brahim Almarales
Abstract: This Guidebook was prepared for participants in War and Healing reading/discussion groups that took place in the Fall of 2018 and the Winter of 2019. It contains general information about the program and its goals, reading lists, and reading excerpts to be discussed.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://historyofhealth.fiu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/WHParticGuideLargeF.pdf
Audience: General Public


NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center
Grant details: BH-231287-15
Title: NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center
Author: Various NEH workshop participants, 2010 - present
Abstract: The NEH "Most Southern" Workshop Lesson Plans Resource Center serves as a digital archive of participants' contributed lesson plans, reflections, and other materials created during the workshop. The Resource Center is accessible to current and former NEH participants, as well as the general public.
Year: 2010
Primary URL: http://deltacenterdsu.com/lesson-plans-1
Audience: Other


Brain Writing Lesson Plan
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Brain Writing Lesson Plan
Author: Jesica Stock
Abstract: Through a Brain-Writing Activity, educators will receive feedback and development suggestions on a lesson plan idea based on a topic of their choosing, and reflective of their experiences during the NEH America’s Industrial Revolution Workshop at The Henry Ford.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Who Really Invented the McCormick Reaper?
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Who Really Invented the McCormick Reaper?
Author: Jesica Stock
Author: Deb Reid
Abstract: Through a study of primary and secondary sources, students will consider how a historical narrative is built and supported over time. Students will consider sources bias and motivations, contemporary context, and other explicit and implicit factors that historians consider when constructing a historical narrative. Students will then develop a historical narrative based on their reading of the sources.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Source Evaluation
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Source Evaluation
Author: Jesica Stock
Abstract: Created to teach students to evaluate historical sources.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Tic-Tac-Toe Technology Project
Grant details: BH-261620-18
Title: Tic-Tac-Toe Technology Project
Author: Lisa Bircher
Abstract: Grade 9 Physical Science Lesson Plan. Created using THF digital resources and content delivered during the project.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


African Americans in the Making of Early New England
Grant details: BH-261659-18
Title: African Americans in the Making of Early New England
Author: Lynne Manring
Author: Joanne Melish
Abstract: This NEH Landmarks Workshop of American History and Culture served as a graduate course for participating teachers who desired graduate credits. The course was offered through Westfield State University.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/
Primary URL Description: Website for the NEH Landmarks of American History & Culture Workshop, "African Americans in the Making of Early New England"
Audience: Graduate


Lessons by teachers
Grant details: BH-261659-18
Title: Lessons by teachers
Author: 2019 "African Americans in the Making of Early New England" participants
Abstract: Participants were required to produce lessons by the end of the workshop week.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/
Primary URL Description: Workshop website for "African Americans in the Making of Early New England"
Secondary URL: https://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org/lessons-by-teachers/
Secondary URL Description: This is the section of our workshop website where we post lessons created by participating teachers.
Audience: K - 12


Lesson plan
Grant details: BH-261682-18
Title: Lesson plan
Author: Megan McGrath
Abstract: One of the most important lessons I took away from the NEH Lowell workshop is the importance of students “doing history” and learning about the American Industrial Revolution through activities and tours of the sites where history happened. My aim while creating the following lessons was to achieve the mission of the Tsongas Industrial History Center by inspiring, “...connections with and understandings about America's industrial past, present, and future through experiential learning using Lowell's unique resources.” The following lessons include opportunities for students to complete primary and secondary source based activities in which Lowell’s history is used as a case study to explore the causes and consequences of the American Industrial Revolution.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Lesson plan
Grant details: BH-261682-18
Title: Lesson plan
Author: Kaitlin Magsarili
Abstract: Throughout my participation in “The Lowell Experience” workshop, I have not only increased my background knowledge of Lowell’s impact on the Industrial Revolution, but I have gained access to valuable resources I can use in my teaching practice. My fifth graders often have a difficult time imagining what life would have been like throughout periods of history and they learn best through visuals and role-play. Therefore, when developing my lessons following the workshop, I wanted to focus on allowing students to explore the Industrial Revolution through hands-on activities, research-based lessons, and creative experiences. I’d also love to take my students on a field trip to the Tsongas Industrial History Center and encourage colleagues at my school to do the same. In the following lessons, you’ll find more information on the context of the lessons as well as lesson objectives and essential questions. I plan to share these lessons and resources with my colleagues to help all fifth grade students in my school gain a deeper understanding of the Industrial Revolution as it pertains to Lowell, our town’s neighboring city.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


NEH 2019 Summer Institute Teacher Created Lesson Plans
Grant details: BH-261703-18
Title: NEH 2019 Summer Institute Teacher Created Lesson Plans
Author: Charlene Mano Shen
Author: Rahul Gupta
Author: Various
Abstract: NEH 2019 Summer Teacher Workshops -- Created Lesson Plans and Curriculum Resources
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://curriculum.wingluke.org/?page_id=3206
Primary URL Description: Link to the home page with teacher lesson plans.
Audience: K - 12


Lesson plans: Why Does Thoreau Matter?
Grant details: BH-261730-18
Title: Lesson plans: Why Does Thoreau Matter?
Author: Living Deliberately Workshop Participants
Abstract: These lesson plans, created for a range of grade levels and disciplines, use as a base the observations Thoreau made, the questions he asked, and the questions that the teachers (and ultimately their students) will articulate based on their own observations. Participants will have a choice of seven major threads to follow which connect to what we believe are the most important aspects of Thoreau’s thought for young people, and to answer perhaps the most important question of all: Why does Thoreau matter? Being Awake, Aware, and Alive Hearing that Different Drummer Examining Desperate and Deliberate Lives Living in Society Living in Nature Practicing Simplicity Choosing Life with Principle Participants will develop lesson
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://concordmuseum.org/education/neh-landmarks-workshop/workshop-resources-from-2019/
Primary URL Description: This is part of the CONCORD MUSEUM website - on the EDUCATION page.
Audience: K - 12


Participant Lessons (website link)
Grant details: BH-261754-18
Title: Participant Lessons (website link)
Author: UCBHSSP and Participating Teachers
Abstract: Our workshop website lists select examples of participant work products for sharing more broadly with teachers. Also included are two assignments that could be used in classrooms.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://ucbhssp.berkeley.edu/teacher-resources/neh-summer/resources
Primary URL Description: This webpage is embedded in the workshop website. It includes select participant lessons from 2019, and previous sessions.
Audience: K - 12


History 413/513
Grant details: BH-50554-13
Title: History 413/513
Author: Jose R Torre
Abstract: New course created based on the workshop. The Rochester Reform Trail is a required course for College at Brockport students in the Public History and Museum studies track. Course creates product then used in the workshop by the NEH summer scholars and available through Brockport Digital Commons as a pedagogical resource.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


The Importance of Personal Identity
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: The Importance of Personal Identity
Author: Valerie Cypert, Keely Jackson, Chantea Wright
Abstract: Three middle school teachers from three different parts of the country - California, Texas, and Virginia - will teach a unit on The Importance of Personal Identity. This is an interdisciplinary unit that includes standards from Language Arts, Social Studies, and Music.
Year: 2014
Audience: K - 12


Music with "no words"
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Music with "no words"
Author: Roxanne Rose
Abstract: Ms. Rose teaches first grade at Citizens of the World charter school in Los Angeles. Her school's focus is "mindfulness" and thus her unit allows students to connect Ellington's music to feelings, movement, art, visualizing, and personal expression. Given the rich cultural diversity of her students, Ms. Rose will teach how jazz is American music because it includes influences from so many other cultures and unifies people across the globe. Her students will explore the question "why do we listen to music." They will dance, identify instruments, and watch videos.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://citizensoftheworld.org/
Audience: K - 12


Jazz as a Conceptual Framework for American Studies
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Jazz as a Conceptual Framework for American Studies
Author: Matthew Pavia
Abstract: Matt teaches at Darien HS in Darien, CT. American Studies is an 11th grade interdisciplinary course co-taught with a literature and history teacher and integrates history, literature, art, architecture, music, and media in order to provide students with a broader, more rich understanding of American culture in all of its complexity. Students spend two back-to-back periods in this course on a daily basis. It is almost exclusively taught using primary sources. The General Objective of this framework is for students to use jazz - its musical features, evolution, politics - as a central metaphor for the American story, and to continue to draw upon this analogy throughout the year as they deepen their understanding of key American themes and patterns of conflict: race, the tension between the status quo and change, the fear ofg the "other", synthesis and syncretism, and innovation.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.darienps.org
Audience: K - 12


Historically Annotated Performance of Ellington's Music
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Historically Annotated Performance of Ellington's Music
Author: Jill Whiteman
Abstract: Ms. Whiteman teaches band and chorus at the Baker Public Schools in Baker, Montana (112 students in grades 9-12). As part of the community-wide concert, this event also included student-made visual art work, powerpoint presentations, and introductions to the music researched and written by the students. Montana's Office of Public Instruction has an Indian Education for All which requires integrating Indian education into rigorous standards-based instruction. For this unit, students will compare and contrast Native American flute music with examples from Ellington's music. this Unit was so successful that the principal is going to have a district wide focus around music or a musician every year!
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.baker.k12.mt.us/index.html
Audience: K - 12


Rhapsody in Black: Visualizing the Harlem Renaissaince in the 1920s and 1930s
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Rhapsody in Black: Visualizing the Harlem Renaissaince in the 1920s and 1930s
Author: Tiffany "Mama Talibah" Mance
Abstract: Ms. Mance teaches 4th grade at the Betty Shabazz International Charter School in Chicago, IL. In this unit the students will analyze and create art, poems, and songs that reflect the arts of the Harlem Renaissance. Beginning with a brief history of the blues, the students will learn to listen to music, analyze primary sources, and create a final project that will be features in the end-of-unit performance. Will include Romare Bearden and the Great Migration.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.bsics.org/
Audience: K - 12


Writing Across the Curriculum through Duke Ellington and jazz
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Writing Across the Curriculum through Duke Ellington and jazz
Author: Cindy Christian
Abstract: Ms. Christian teaches writing at Northwest Rankin High School in Flowood, MS, a suburb of Jackson. Students will be asked to develop six expository essays throughout the semester, focusing on jazz and Duke Ellington. The theme of jazz as a metaphor for writing/life and the significance of music in our culture will be emphasized throughout the semester and culminate in a Jazz, Poetry, and Art Night for students and members of the community, which will be a fundraiser for the school. The Jazz Band will perform, student artwork based on or inspired by jazz will be featured, and poems will be read aloud.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.rcsd.ms/Domain/23
Audience: K - 12


The Ellington-Gatsby Mixtape Project
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: The Ellington-Gatsby Mixtape Project
Author: David Wooley
Abstract: Mr. Wooley teaches high school English at Westhill HS in Stamford, CT and is an active hip-hop artist. For this project, students will create a playlist of at list 10 songs from Ellington's catalog in order to create a musical counterpoint for specific scenes from Gatsby. The music should complement the literary elements on which you decide to focus. Your portfolio will have a quote from the book in relation to each song and you will create cover art for your project that reflects both Gatsby and Ellington.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.westhillweb.com/
Audience: K - 12


Duke Ellington and Langston Hughes: The Rhythms and Beats of a Universal Story
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Duke Ellington and Langston Hughes: The Rhythms and Beats of a Universal Story
Author: Gina M. Jackson
Abstract: Ms. Jackson teaches grade 10 English in the San Diego Unified School District. through the works of Ellington and Hughes, students will be able to implement the concept of Universal Theme in the mediums of music and poetry. Students will research and discuss the works of Ellington and Hughes as compared to their biographies. They will analyze the historical and social contexts in which these artists worked, and they will be able to compare and contrast a piece of artistic work from each artist and apply an appropriate Universal Theme.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.sandi.net/site/default.aspx?PageID=1
Audience: K - 12


Black History Month Celebration
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Black History Month Celebration
Author: Mr. Keith Howell
Abstract: This is a public performance for the community by the students of Woodrow Wilson HS in Camden, NJ. It was called "Take the A-train to Harlem" and was dedicated to Duke Ellington. It featured spoken work, singing, dancing, rappers, and the jazz ensemble of the HS. The students worked hard to learn their material and to be able to explain its context and importance to the audience. It was a grand success!
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.wwhsnj.org/
Audience: K - 12


The American Experience
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: The American Experience
Author: Tyler Flory
Abstract: Mr Flory teaches at Main Street School of Performing Arts (MSSPA), a tuition-free, public charter high school open to all students in grades 9 though 12 in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. I used the materials from the NEH Ellington workshop every week in class. My colleagues were so intrigued with what I had learned that we are not building a year-long American Experience class which will begin in 2015-16.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://msspahs.org/
Audience: K - 12


Music as Metaphor
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Music as Metaphor
Author: Katherine Byers
Abstract: Ms. Byers teachers 8th grade English at Midlothian Middle School in Midlothian, VA. Through four mini lessons spread through out the year, students will use musical vocabulary to talk about writing, use the metaphor of music for writing and analyzing other works, and will build their understanding of metaphor and their vocabulary.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.midlothianms.mychesterfieldschools.com/pages/Midlothian_Middle
Audience: K - 12


Walking with Duke - Bringing Harlem to Utah
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Walking with Duke - Bringing Harlem to Utah
Author: Ms. Cassie Cox
Abstract: Ms. Cox teaches at Two Rivers High School in Ogden, UT which is an alternative high school for students with attendance, academic, or disciplinary issues. During January/February of 2015, students at Two Rivers will collaborate with students/faculty at Weber State University, engaging in a multi-school, whole-community study of the legacy of Duke Ellington. Using jazz and the life of Ellington, we will embark on a journey to uncover and understand Ellington's lasing legacy while considering our own. (What will our life say to others? How weill we be remembered? How do others see us now? How would we like the world to see us?) In our journey through the life of Ellington (and the Harlem Renaissance), students will read literature and poetry, listen to music, respond in writing to both literature and music, create artwork, learn dances, "taste" Harlem, explore Harlem and Duke through images and documentaries, examine the economic, social and political contexts (ESP), while considering our own. Loren Schonberg from the National Jazz Museum in Harlem will visit our school to celebrate and extend our study of Ellington.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.trhs.weber.k12.ut.us/
Audience: K - 12


Jazz dance through music and history - a choreography project
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Jazz dance through music and history - a choreography project
Author: Mamawa Fofana
Abstract: Ms. Fofana teaches dance at the Brownsville Academy High School in Brooklyn, NY. Students will be able to identify and familiarize themselves with Jazz dance, its origin, and learn jazz choreography, including improvisation. Choreography and movement will be grounded in historical evidence. Students will connect to ELA through "building knowledge through content-rich non-fiction and informational text" and to Math by "requiring fluency, application, and deep understanding." In addition, personal competencies 1-8 will be applied: self management, planning and responsibility, problem solving, integrity, reflection and evaluation, cooperation, conflict resolution, and cultural competence.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://schools.nyc.gov/schoolportals/17/k568/default.htm
Audience: K - 12


Ellington in Europe
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Ellington in Europe
Author: James Miller
Abstract: Mr. Miller teaches at the Department of Defense elementary school in Aviano, Italy, grades 4 and 5. Students will participate in various forms of musical expression, demonstrate an understanding of musical concepts, display an awareness of the interrelationship between music and society, and display an understanding and appreciation of music as an art form. My unit will follow our week of learning at the NEH workshop, including using "Sir Duke" by Stevie Wonder to introduce Ellington, I will teach scat singing and improv as we were taught by Loren Schonberg at the National Jazz Museum, do ring shouts as Brian Torff taught us, do the LIndy Hop because not only do you feel the music, it provides wonderful social skills for out students. At Midsummer Nights Swing, 100% of the people were smiling, laughing, and enjoying each other's company. Yohuru Williams historical analysis using ESP (economic, social and political contexts) will be applied, as well. In addition, I work with the Dept of Defense Dependents Schools European Jazz Seminar and we teach and perform Ellington pieces once every four years. I can now take a leadership role in this and help the teachers convey to their students the importance of Ellington. Third, I perform in a big band with Italian musicians and can teach them about Ellington and Ellington's music, as well.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.dodea.edu/Europe/Mediterranean/Aviano/AvianoES/index.cfm/
Audience: K - 12


Why Duke?
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: Why Duke?
Author: Scott Pragoff
Abstract: Mr. Pragoff teachers 8th grade social studies at Highland School in Warrenton, VA. The essential question is in what ways did Duke Ellington use music to promote a sense of political, social and economic awareness for the Black community during his lifetime? Students will analyze primary sources, political cartoons, and music. They will synthesize the narrative of Ellington's life, this will create a webpage that highlights Ellington's impact socially, politically, and economically.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.highlandschool.org/
Audience: K - 12


The Civil Rights Movement as seen through the Lens of Duke ELlington's Music
Grant details: BH-50600-13
Title: The Civil Rights Movement as seen through the Lens of Duke ELlington's Music
Author: Mr. Randy Cummings
Abstract: Mr. Cummings teaches the K-5 gifted program in the Boulder Unified District, Colorado. In this unit students will learn about the contributions of African-American visual artists and musicians in the decades preceding the 1960s. They will understand the importance of Ellington and how his music was a significant catalyst for change in creating a new paradigm of race relations. They will read visual images of African-American artists as a text t the African-American experience in America.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://bvsd.org/tag/Pages/default.aspx
Audience: K - 12


Deciphering Old German Script
Grant details: CH-50975-13
Title: Deciphering Old German Script
Author: Mark Louden
Abstract: Based on resources from the Max Kade Institute archives, this workshop introduces participants to the basics of reading German handwritten materials, with a special focus on those from the 19th century. The workshop combines presentations with practical exercises. Participants are welcome to bring copies of documents they are interested in working on. Open to the public. Registration required
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://mki.wisc.edu/events/2016/workshop-deciphering-old-german-script
Primary URL Description: "Deciphering Old German Script" workshop description
Audience: General Public


Common Language Reading Group 2014
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Common Language Reading Group 2014
Author: Greg Wahl, Facilitator 2014
Abstract: In four spirited face-to-face and online meetings during fall 2014, sixteen faculty, staff, and administrators participated in the GHI’s Common Language Reading Group, discussing Manfred Steger’s Globalization: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford UP). Here are some excerpts of participants’ perspectives and debates on Steger’s Cultural Studies explication of the economic, political, cultural, ecological, and ideological dimensions of globalization.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=59070
Primary URL Description: Global Humanities Institute Common Language Reading Group
Audience: Graduate


Common Language Reading Group 2015
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Common Language Reading Group 2015
Author: Cinder Cooper Barnes, Facilitator 2015
Abstract: The Spring 2015 Globalization Reading Group again chose Manfred B. Steger’s seminal work, Globalization: A Very Brief Intro-duction for the second time. This text is particularly appropriate for Montgomery College because of our location near the capitol and be-cause of our diverse student and employee body. Our students, even more so than other community college students, are diverse, coming from over 160 countries, the District of Columbia and surrounding counties. We work so hard to serve our students and community and awaken in them an appreciation of our discipline that we often take for granted our own growth. As such, the reading group was open to both faculty and staff from all three campuses. The Book Group offered Montgomery College employees the oppor-tunity to perspective take and think critically and civically about our place in the world. The diversity of the group allowed for dynamic in-teractions and discussions along with the sharing of useful resources. We had three face-to-face meetings lasting two hours each, and one virtual meeting via Blackboard Community. During each of these meetings, we discussed two chapters of Globalization: A Very Brief Introduction. We began each face-to-face meeting with each partici-pant sharing some thoughts, reactions, and questions about the chap-ters. For the virtual meeting, participants posted a response to a facili-tator prompt in the designated Blackboard Community and at least one original reaction / question / presentation of materials with ac-companying explanation, related to the chapters being discussed.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=59070
Primary URL Description: Global Humanities Institute Common Language Reading Group
Audience: Graduate


GHI Fellows' redesigned global courses and learning communities
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: GHI Fellows' redesigned global courses and learning communities
Author: Greg Wahl, Facilitator, Individual Course Fellowship
Author: Marcia Bronstein, Facilitator, Learning Community Fellowship
Abstract: Two fellowships are being offered. Faculty can apply for fellowships focused on Revising Individual Courses or Creating Learning Communities. The Revising Individual Courses Fellowship will guide faculty through the process of globalizing a humanities course that they currently teach. The session series will be supplemented and enriched by stimulating guest speakers, readings, and discussions related to the interdisciplinary and global aspects of the humanities. In the Learning Community Fellowship of the Global Humanities Institute, faculty partners will integrate and internationalize a pair of courses in order for students to study a current or enduring “big question” of interdisciplinary humanities. Fellows will be guided in selecting a compelling theme for the learning community and identifying global and cross-cultural approaches to examining it.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=52460
Primary URL Description: Links to Fellows' globalized courses and learning communities
Audience: General Public


Summer Research Grants 2014
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Summer Research Grants 2014
Author: Jean Freeman
Author: Elizabeth Huergo
Author: Alejandro Leopardi
Author: Meryl Shapiro
Abstract: Professor Jean Freeman, History; Women's Studies, Rockville - Research subject: Peggy Seeger: Music and Global Human Rights; Professor Elizabeth Huergo, English, Rockville - Research subject: Latina/o Literatures in the US; Professor Alejandro Leopardi, English, Germantown - Research subject: Latin American Literature: Focus and Exploration on a Vital Sector in Literature; Professor Meryl Shapiro, Performing Arts, TP/SS - Research subject: If Rhythm of Music and Human Motions Can Be Rooted Back to the Heartbeat, Why do Diverse Cultures Create and Evolve Rhythms Differently?
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=52470
Primary URL Description: Summer Research Grantees, 2014
Audience: General Public


New Course: Introduction to Global Humanities
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: New Course: Introduction to Global Humanities
Author: Rita Kranidis
Author: Joan Naake
Author: Ken Jassie
Author: Greg Wahl
Author: Nancy Nyland
Abstract: Study of the many humanities themes from the standpoint of global interconnections. Global Humanities 101 takes an interdisciplinary humanities approach to a number of themes. Specifically, it encourages students to consider a number of topics related to global issues using historical, literary, linguistic, and philosophical lenses. The course encourages students to recognize their responsibilities to society –locally, nationally, and globally--and to consider their academic and personal goals. Students will also consider current issues of global importance.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=52873
Primary URL Description: New Course: Introduction to Global Humanities
Audience: Undergraduate


Global Virtual Exchange: Montgomery College and the University of El Salvador
Grant details: CZ-50300-13
Title: Global Virtual Exchange: Montgomery College and the University of El Salvador
Author: Shelley Jones
Author: Carla Naranjo
Abstract: As one of the Global Humanities Institute’s (GHI) initiatives to bring the world to Montgomery College (MC) students, last semester Spanish learners engaged in a virtual cultural exchange with Modern Language majors from the University of El Salvador (UES). Born out of connections made during the July 2013 GHI workgroup trip to El Salvador, the effort was a collaboration between the UES Dean of Humanities, GHI Director Rita Kranidis, MC Instructional Designer Tom Cantu and the staff from Media Resources, two UES English professors and MC Spanish professors Shelley Jones and Carla Naranjo. MC participants included students from elementary through intermediate level Spanish while all of the UES students involved were English or Modern Language majors. Students from both countries posed questions in their native languages for their exchange partners to consider before the actual virtual meeting. In the case of the intermediate Spanish students, responses were given in Spanish, integrating language production practice with the cultural aspects of the exchange.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/Department4.aspx?id=80309
Secondary URL Description: Global Virtual Exchange: Montgomery College and the University of El Salvador
Audience: Undergraduate


Spanish Conversation: Cinema
Grant details: ED-50167-03
Title: Spanish Conversation: Cinema
Author: David T. Gies
Abstract: The site has enriched a course I have taught at the University of Virginia. Students can access the website and use it to improve their pronunciation, comprehension, and vocabulary.
Year: 2009
Audience: Undergraduate


Whitman College Course: English 246A: Native American Literatures
Grant details: EH-256812-17
Title: Whitman College Course: English 246A: Native American Literatures
Author: Christopher Leise
Abstract: This course will help you think about three distinct traditions of American Indian writing—those of the Haudenosaunee, Kiowa, and the Columbia Plateau peoples—not as representative of “Native American Literature,” but as discrete entities from among the more than six hundred nations indigenous to the land mass we presently call North America. Though such work may unsettle your hopes to draw conclusions about “Native American” thinking and self-expression, I hope it will put you in a stronger position to learn how to learn about an indigenous national literary history.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Graduate Seminar on O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Graduate Seminar on O'Connor
Author: Douglas Robillard, Jr.
Abstract: O'Connor course taught in Summer 2008.
Year: 2008
Audience: K - 12


Consultation with Wipf and Stock
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Consultation with Wipf and Stock
Author: Douglas Robillard, Jr.
Abstract: Robillard consulted with the publisher Wipf & Stock about its Flannery O'Connor Studies Series. This consultation led to the reprinting of two books about O'Connor, by Preston Browning and Josephine Hendin.
Year: 2009
Primary URL: http://wipfandstock.com
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


Engl 380 Author Study - Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 380 Author Study - Flannery O'Connor
Author: Mark S. Graybill
Abstract: course taught at Widener University
Year: 2009
Audience: K - 12


Engl 301 - Methods of Literary Study
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 301 - Methods of Literary Study
Author: Mark S. Graybill
Abstract: O'Connor is incorporated as the primary figure in this "gateway" course required of English majors at Widener University.
Year: 2008
Audience: K - 12


summer research project
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: summer research project
Author: John D. Sykes, Jr.
Abstract: Like many of the conference participants, Sykes reports improvement in already existing courses. He also reports that he conducted a summer research project with an undergraduate student.
Year: 2010
Audience: K - 12


GBK 495 - Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: GBK 495 - Flannery O'Connor
Author: Charlotte Thomas
Abstract: Mercer University Great Books course
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


new course on O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: new course on O'Connor
Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
Abstract: course at Bangor Theological Seminary
Year: 2009
Audience: K - 12


course on "New Testament Theology and Modern Fiction"
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: course on "New Testament Theology and Modern Fiction"
Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
Abstract: course at Bangor Theological Seminary featuring O'Connor with other authors
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Special Topics in Creative Writing
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Special Topics in Creative Writing
Author: Barbara Zimmermann Bogue
Abstract: course prominently featuring Flannery O'Connor, taught several times since 2007 at Ball State University.
Year: 2007
Audience: K - 12


Course on Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Course on Flannery O'Connor
Author: Ramsey Michaels
Abstract: Taught a course on Flannery O'Connor at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, Maine.
Year: 2010
Audience: Undergraduate


New Testament Theology
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: New Testament Theology
Author: Ramsey Michaels
Abstract: Taught about O'Connor in this course at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, Maine.
Year: 2011
Audience: Undergraduate


Modern Fiction
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Modern Fiction
Author: Ramsey Michaels
Abstract: Taught about O'Connor in this course at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, Maine.
Year: 2011
Audience: Undergraduate


Engl 1102
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 1102
Author: Doug Davis
Abstract: Davis teaches a unit on O'Connor in his freshman Literature and Research course at Gordon College.
Year: 2007
Audience: K - 12


Engl 3402 - The Literature of the Civil Rights Era: 1955-1965
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 3402 - The Literature of the Civil Rights Era: 1955-1965
Author: Carole Harris
Abstract: Course at New York City College of Technology
Year: 2009
Audience: K - 12


Engl 3403 - Rereading Flannery O'Connor in an Age of Terrorism and Technology
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 3403 - Rereading Flannery O'Connor in an Age of Terrorism and Technology
Author: Carole Harris
Abstract: Course at New York City College of Technology
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Engl 612 - Women Writers of the Cold War: Flannery O'Connor, Shirley Jackson, and Eudora Welty
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 612 - Women Writers of the Cold War: Flannery O'Connor, Shirley Jackson, and Eudora Welty
Author: Avis Hewitt
Abstract: course at Grand Valley State University
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Engl 605: Literature of the American South
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: Engl 605: Literature of the American South
Author: Avis Hewitt
Abstract: course at Grand Valley State University featuring O'Connor alongside other writers
Year: 2010
Audience: K - 12


New Course: "The Divine Vision of Flannery O'Connor"
Grant details: EH-50075-06
Title: New Course: "The Divine Vision of Flannery O'Connor"
Author: Caolyn M Kerr
Abstract: spring term course being taught at Gordon College, Wenham, MA
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12


junior, interdisciplinary seminar on Leonardo (JINS 394 Biography: Leonardo) at Truman State University
Grant details: EH-50290-11
Title: junior, interdisciplinary seminar on Leonardo (JINS 394 Biography: Leonardo) at Truman State University
Author: Julia De Lancey
Abstract: course developed at Truman State University
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


"Art, Science, and Technology" at University of Massachusets, Lowain
Grant details: EH-50290-11
Title: "Art, Science, and Technology" at University of Massachusets, Lowain
Author: Marie Frank
Abstract: a new course which focuses upon the relationship of art and science from the Renaissance into the Twentieth Century. This course is part of a much larger project to establish a new major "Visual Critical Studies" that will have four tracks; one of the tracks is specifically designed to draw from the strong science/engineering pool of students.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Seminar on Leonardo da Vinci: Art and Science, Clark University
Grant details: EH-50290-11
Title: Seminar on Leonardo da Vinci: Art and Science, Clark University
Author: John Garton
Abstract: Seminar was taught to 15 students in Spring 2014 at Clark University, Worcester, MA and many lesson plans were a direct outcome of the NEH Institute and keeping in touch with its members. The seminar will be repeated in 2016. 2-day learning units have been offered in another course in 2014 to 28 students that reflected the art/science merger of the NEH Leonardo institute
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1102, American Gothic
Grant details: EH-50366-13
Title: ENGL 1102, American Gothic
Author: Monica Miller
Abstract: Taught O'Connor in course, Georgia Tech
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 4950: Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50366-13
Title: ENGL 4950: Flannery O'Connor
Author: Rhonda Armstrong
Abstract: Spring 2015, Augusta University
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Single Author: Flannery O'Connor
Grant details: EH-50366-13
Title: Single Author: Flannery O'Connor
Author: Gina Caison
Abstract: Fall 2015, Georgia State University
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Dante's Commedia
Grant details: EH-50370-13
Title: Dante's Commedia
Author: Akash Kumar
Abstract: This course examined the visual art that Dante experienced. It was inspired by the experience of first-time seeing these works in the Institute sessions. Akash Kumar writes, "On the curriculum front, my course this past quarter on the Commedia was very much inspired by the institute, especially in featuring the history of visual representation and aspects of material culture, from sites that we visited and manuscripts that we looked at together all the way to Birk's 21st-century illustrations. A curricular goal that started in part last quarter was having students doing collaborative digital annotations of canti...the eventual goal is to teach a course that results in a student-produced annotated digital edition of the poem."
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Honors Special Topics: Epic Journeys
Grant details: EH-50370-13
Title: Honors Special Topics: Epic Journeys
Author: David Miller
Abstract: Special topics courses in the English department give students and faculty the opportunity to explore texts and topics that are not included in the regular curriculum. This particular course—Epic Journeys—will focus on three epics from the western literature tradition: Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Dante’s Divine Comedy. The course will approach these works through the lens of genre by comparing and contrasting epic characteristics in each and through the lens of metaphor by comparing and contrasting the central metaphor of the journey in each.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


The Contexts and Legacies of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Lesson Plans and Curricular Materials
Grant details: ES-23168-02
Title: The Contexts and Legacies of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Lesson Plans and Curricular Materials
Author: Department of History at Minot State University
Abstract: An edited collection of teaching materials, lesson plans and guides for grade 4-12, along with a slide show of photographs and diagrams, from the Lewis and Clark Institute held at Minot State University, July 2003.
Year: 2003
Primary URL: http://www.worldcat.org/title/contexts-and-legacies-of-the-lewis-and-clark-expedition-lesson-plans-and-curricular-materials/oclc/65429052?referer=di&ht=edition
Audience: Other


Honoring Civil Rights Movement Veterans: "Write That I" Poetry
Grant details: ES-256868-17
Title: Honoring Civil Rights Movement Veterans: "Write That I" Poetry
Author: Teachers in the NEH 2018 summer institute
Abstract: These poems are by classroom teachers in the 2018 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Teacher Institute, “The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives from 1940-1980.” The institute was hosted by the Duke University Franklin Humanities Institute, in collaboration with the SNCC Legacy Project and Teaching for Change. The people honored by the poetry are veterans of the Civil Rights Movement. The authors learned about their work from SNCC Digital (www.snccdigital.org), the CRMvet.org website, and additional resources shared during the institute.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.teachingforchange.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Poetry-Collection-August-2018_NEH_Institute.pdf
Primary URL Description: The poetry collection was posted for access by the teacher participants and others.
Audience: General Public


Summer Scholars Curriculum Development Projects
Grant details: ES-261677-18
Title: Summer Scholars Curriculum Development Projects
Author: 23 of our summer scholars
Abstract: Curriculum development projects created by summer scholars, available to download by their peers from the institute website
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://religiousworldsnyc.org/resource-page/lesson-plans-curriculum-units-and-community-based-programs
Audience: K - 12


2019 Stony the Road Teacher Lesson Plans
Grant details: ES-261681-18
Title: 2019 Stony the Road Teacher Lesson Plans
Author: Dr. Andraya Anderson-James
Author: Beth Banning
Author: Bonnie Belshe
Author: Aimee Blanchette
Author: Jeffrey Boogaard
Author: Carol Burkhead-Fox
Author: Marian Doman
Author: Margaret Engman
Author: Sarah Ewell
Author: Christina Fanning
Author: William Frazier
Author: Francine Havard
Author: Ashley Hesseltine
Author: Jared Huhta
Author: Lynn Janik
Author: Andrea Javor
Author: Deidre Jenkins
Author: Erin Landvatter
Author: Sean McAtee
Author: Clarence McClung
Author: Calvin McFarland
Author: Kevin Mears
Author: Sydney Neville
Author: Anna Osborne
Author: Douglas Paul
Author: Thea Storz
Author: Lisa Stubenrauch
Author: Solomon Williams
Author: LaToya Snead
Abstract: These Civil Rights Movement lesson plans were developed along "concept" lines to allow them to work for teachers of different subjects and allow for collaboration across curricular borders.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.stonytheroad.org/2019-teacher-lesson-plans/
Primary URL Description: Civil Rights Movement lesson plans for K-12 classrooms
Audience: K - 12


NEH GAPE Teacher-Created Lesson Plans
Grant details: ES-261753-18
Title: NEH GAPE Teacher-Created Lesson Plans
Author: Bonnie Lewis
Author: Elizabeth McMichael
Author: Joy Sharp
Author: Christine McKinzie
Author: James Johnson
Author: Coleen Curry
Author: Shifa Ahmed
Author: Daniel Davis
Author: Teresa Shadoin
Author: Chassity Mahaska
Author: Terry Atkins
Author: John Hall
Author: Jennifer Rock
Author: E.M. Eisen-Markowitz
Author: Jennifer Hunter
Author: Kerry Brown
Author: Matthew Laney
Author: Judith Ganley
Author: Asra Ziauddin
Author: Raven Reed-Althimer
Author: Keri Swyden
Author: Krystal Davis
Author: Larissa Fillingham
Author: Jessica Murach
Author: Crystal Watkins
Author: Samantha Averett-Boyd
Author: Meera Gorawara
Abstract: Lesson plans with descriptive notes and links to resources the were developed by teachers drawing the content of the NEH GAPE Institute.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.gildedandprogressive.com/teacher-created-resources.html
Primary URL Description: Link to page hosting collections from all 5 years of GAPE Institutes.
Audience: K - 12


The Contexts and Legacies of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Lesson Plans and Curricular Materials
Grant details: ES-50042-04
Title: The Contexts and Legacies of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: Lesson Plans and Curricular Materials
Author: Department of History at Minot State University
Abstract: An edited collection of teaching materials, lesson plans and guides for grades 4-12, from the Lewis and Clark Institute held at Minot State University, July 2004. Formats include lesson plans, WebQuests, and DBQs. Themes include Exploration and Environment, Jefferson and Nation-Building, American West, and Native Cultures and Legacies.
Year: 2005
Audience: Other


Monumental Literacy
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Monumental Literacy
Author: Diane Hance
Abstract: This lesson will recreate one of the experiences of the 2015 Monuments of Rome in English Culture NEH Summer Teacher Institute. Students will explore a selection of Roman monuments and their history, essentially learning to “read” the messages the monuments are meant to convey. Students will then compare these messages with modern monuments connecting past to present. In Lesson 1 (Introduction to Classical Monuments) students will learn about several “tropes” or symbolic features that appear in classical monuments over time. In Lesson 2 (Understanding Classical Influence), students will apply this basic knowledge as they analyze the purpose of these Classical “tropes” in modern state and national monuments. Finally, students will select one of the state and local monuments to research in depth. The summative project asks students to analyze the architectural details of the monument as well as its history and purpose. Students will take a “guided tour” of the monuments in the Library as they present (and view) final projects, just as the NEH teacher scholars presented monuments to our institute peers at the ancient sites.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Mounuments of Rome in English Culture Website
Audience: K - 12


Rhetoric in the Monuments of Rome
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Rhetoric in the Monuments of Rome
Author: Claire Walter
Abstract: The classical tradition of rhetoric traces its history from Greece with Plato and Aristotle through to Rome and Cicero. The physical spaces constructed during these time periods, moreover, serve as a tangible reflection of the rhetorical styles, structures, and tenets of these early philosophers and orators. Both Cicero in the waning days of the Roman Republic and Augustus in his rise as Emperor of Rome employ rhetorical strategies and devices that are simultaneously reflected in the physical spaces around them. In studying the visual depiction of rhetoric in conjunction with the written form, students will build visual frameworks for identifying written rhetorical strategies and analyzing their use. In Lesson 1, students will explore and develop relationships between several related primary sources in order to build a synthesized argument on Augustus’s rhetorical strategies. In Lesson 2, students will follow the same format with new source materials from Cicero to build independence in the process and develop greater understanding of rhetorical analysis. Finally, in Lesson 3, students will apply the skills developed in Lessons 1 & 2 to write a rhetorical analysis essay.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English Culture Website
Audience: K - 12


Rhetoric of Rome in English Culture
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Rhetoric of Rome in English Culture
Author: Neva Coats
Author: Denise Scavitto
Author: Diane Hance
Author: Claire Walter
Abstract: Students will understand the importance of symbols used to convey specific messages in Classical literature, art and architecture.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Monuments of Rome in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


An Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: An Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Author: Amy Perez
Author: Ruban Sandoval
Abstract: Analyze and understand the story and significance of the Roman Pantheon throughout its existence and explain why it continues to be important today. Through the addition of units in art history, math and chemistry, to use the pantheon to demonstrate the interconnection of of the humanities and sciences in the understanding of history and culture.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


Art History Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Art History Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Author: Candace Printz
Abstract: The Pantheon is a building in Rome, Italy that has undergone numerous transformations throughout the years. This building has gone from being a pagan temple, to being used by local vendors to sale goods on the porch, then back to a place of worship in the form of a Christian church. Regardless of its purpose, the Pantheon is a fine example of ingenious architecture, even by today’s standards. In this lesson, students will learn about the history of the Roman Empire and the effects it has had on the Pantheon in the past 2,000 years. They will focus on the aesthetics of the building with the help of the elements of art and principles of design. Students will be asked to identify particular visual components of the Pantheon and see what modern-day architecture it may have influenced. Students will also do a hands-on project which will require them to write about, design and construct their own personalized building.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


The Secrets of Roman Concrete: Chemistry Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: The Secrets of Roman Concrete: Chemistry Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Author: Ruth Dominguez
Abstract: The Pantheon is remarkable for its size, construction, and its design. Two factors that have contributed to its success over time are: the quality of mortar used in the concrete and the careful selection and grading of the aggregate materials which range from basalt, tufa, pozzolana, and pumice.(2) Pozzolana is a fine, chocolate-red volcanic earth, which when mixed with hydrated lime forms an excellent cement that will set well even under water. Pozzolana beds are found at Pozzuoli, near Naples, and around Rome.(1) This unit will cover concepts of Materials Science and Technology and give students the opportunity to learn about cement hydration, material properties, and making concrete. Concrete is important to study in the context of chemistry because of its widespread uses.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English Culture webstie
Audience: K - 12


Studying Geometry Through the Pantheon: Math Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Studying Geometry Through the Pantheon: Math Curriculum to Accompany the Interdisciplinary Study of the Roman Pantheon
Author: Maria Rascon
Abstract: This lesson will allow students to explore various geometry concepts concentrating on the radius, circumference, diameter, volume, and surface area of a sphere through such magnificent piece of architecture. Students are expected to apply the geometric properties they have learned in the classroom to real life as we study interesting features of the Pantheon.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English website.
Audience: K - 12


Continuity of Culture Lesson Plan on Romans in Pompeii
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Continuity of Culture Lesson Plan on Romans in Pompeii
Author: Warren Soper
Author: Lori Howell
Author: Melody Nishinaga
Author: Sarah Poku
Abstract: Students will study Roman culture through various activities and be able to explain how the Ancient Romans in Pompeii are similar to people today. “A typical day in this town means going shopping, stopping by the laundry, catching a sporting event at the amphitheater, or maybe taking in a play – and that was 2000 years ago. Can you guess where you are? Not where you might expect: You’re in ancient Pompeii, an Italian village where life came to a fiery halt when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in AD 79. “ -Discover Kids Pompeii Magazine
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Roman Monuments in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


How to Read a Monument: Student Guide to Accompany Lesson on Rhetoric of Rome in English Culture
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: How to Read a Monument: Student Guide to Accompany Lesson on Rhetoric of Rome in English Culture
Author: Christina Pitcher-Cozzone
Abstract: DISSECT Detail:Upon viewing the monument, make a list of all the details you see without stopping- don’t feel a need to analyze or connect them to each other. Inscription:Carefully examine the monument for an inscription on or near the monument. To whom is this dedicated and why are they being remembered in this form? Structure:How are the pieces of this monument working together to create meaning? What is the monument made of? (Research this if you are not sure.) Examine the pieces of the monument. What is the style of it? (Research this.) Was the style inspired by another historical period? (For example- classical.) Symbols:Record possible symbolic elements of the monument. What associations did the society then make with these symbols? What associations does your society now make when examining these symbols? Emotion: What is the emotional impact of the monument? How should the audience feel when viewing it as a whole? What about the separate components of the monument? Context: What is the historical context of the monument? When was it built and what time period does it memorialize? Text: Now that you have explored the monument’s visual components, examine any text on or near the monument. Approach this text as you would any reading. Examine for thematic concepts, historical significance, and allusions that connect the monument to the time period and other historical or cultural icons.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Monuments of Rome in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


Studying Rome via Primary Sources and Artifacts (Symbols and Monuments)
Grant details: ES-50557-14
Title: Studying Rome via Primary Sources and Artifacts (Symbols and Monuments)
Author: Dennis Rogala
Author: Charles Diaz
Author: Kristen Van Der Linden
Author: Matthew Grant Potts
Author: Phillip Harvey
Abstract: Ask students to draw a symbol and use student symbols to introduce the concept of using primary sources and monuments as tools for studying the ancient Romans. Define essential vocabulary for the week. Briefly explain the three paradigms that will be used in the next three days to examine Roman history, then place students in groups and lead them in a discussion of primary source and artifact examples about Roman gladiator games. Emphasize that this will be the method employed in the next three days to examine the three paradigms. Finally, conclude the lesson by reemphasizing the week’s essential question and objectives, the three paradigms, and the upcoming final assessment project.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://romanmonuments.utep.edu
Primary URL Description: Monuments of Rome in English Culture website
Audience: K - 12


Undergraduate course: Spanish Frame Tales
Grant details: FA-52757-06
Title: Undergraduate course: Spanish Frame Tales
Author: Ignacio Navarrete
Abstract: The course examined Spanish frame tales, including both the Medieval tradition with its roots in Arabic and Jewish literature, and the Renaissance tradition with roots in Boccaccio and Italy.
Year: 2012
Audience: Undergraduate


Spanish graduate seminar: Spatial Approaches to narrative
Grant details: FA-52757-06
Title: Spanish graduate seminar: Spatial Approaches to narrative
Author: Ignacio Navarrete
Abstract: A survey of Spanish literature from Calila y Dimna and Cifar (13th c.) to Cela's La Colmena, emphasizing spatial metaphors that can be used to analyze and describe the narrative techniques, including frames and chains (Calila), loops (Cifar), labyrinths, (Don Quijote), Maps and houses (Galdos), and refractions (Cela).
Year: 2013
Audience: Graduate


Europeans in the Early Modern Atlantic World
Grant details: FA-52858-07
Title: Europeans in the Early Modern Atlantic World
Author: James Van Horn Melton
Abstract: This seminar focuses on aspects of European transatlantic migration and settlement from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. It attempts to integrate narratives of origin and settlement by exploring, on the one hand, circumstances the various motives that led Europeans to leave their native lands and forge new lives in an alien environment, and on the other, how their social, cultural, and political experiences in the “Old World” shaped their encounter with the “New.” Special attention is devoted to themes that have animated work in the field of Atlantic history, including transatlantic migration, encounters between European and non-European peoples, the environmental and epidemiological impact of European settlement, religious dimensions of European expansion, the rise of slavery, and the Atlantic revolutions of the later eighteenth century.
Year: 2012
Audience: Graduate


Hyperintensional Metaphysics
Grant details: FA-54195-08
Title: Hyperintensional Metaphysics
Author: Shamik Dasgupta
Author: Boris Kment
Abstract: This course will investigate a number of hyperintensional concepts that have been at the center of much recent discussion in metaphysics, such as the notions of grounding, ontological dependence, metaphysical explanation, metaphysical fundamentality, reducibility, and real definition. We are planning to strike a balance between giving an overview of recent philosophical developments and talking about our own work in progress. We will begin the semester with a discussion of recent work on grounding, followed by a detailed look at a number of more specific question about the grounding relation, e.g. about its formal properties, whether facts about grounding are fundamental, and the relationship between grounding and real definition. Next, we will focus on a specific question about fundamental reality, namely whether all fundamental facts are qualitative, or whether they include facts about which specific individuals exist and how the different qualitative roles are distributed over them. We will consider the commitments, attractions and drawbacks of different possible positions on this issue. This discussion will illustrate the connections between fundamentality and reduction on the one hand and supervenience on the other. That, in turn, will serve as an introduction to our next topic: the connection between hyperintensional and modal notions. Most likely, we will discuss the thesis—propounded by Kit Fine, among others—that modal distinctions can be explained in terms of essence. We will end the seminar by looking briefly at a few other hyperintensional notions, such as truth-making and constitution.
Year: 2010
Audience: Graduate


Dante's Hell and Its Afterlife [show prizes]
Grant details: FA-55993-11
Title: Dante's Hell and Its Afterlife
Author: Guy Raffa
Abstract: Dante Alighieri may not have invented Hell but he created the most powerful and enduring vision of the underworld as a place of eternal punishment for lost souls in the afterlife. This course takes you on a journey down through the nine circles of Hell presented in Dante's Inferno. "Danteworlds," a book and award-winning Web site created here at UT, will help guide you by portraying infernal creatures and scenes and by explaining the medieval poem's vast array of references to religion, philosophy, history, politics, and other works of literature. Along the way, you will encounter adaptations and echoes of Dante's Inferno in selected literary, artistic, cinematic, and popular works, ranging from Sandro Botticelli's illustrations, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and a silent Inferno film to T. S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," Vincent Ward's What Dreams May Come, and Dante-inspired music and video games.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~guyr/UGS3032013264395.pdf
Primary URL Description: Course syllabus
Audience: K - 12


Dante's Afterlives
Grant details: FA-55993-11
Title: Dante's Afterlives
Author: Guy Raffa
Abstract: Summarizing Dante's popularity in Italy in the early twentieth century, one critic amusingly observed that the medieval poet "was cooked in every sauce, served hot and cold, grilled and in gelatin, whole and ground, alone or with sides, with critical mayonnaise and historical croutons: there was something for all tastes, for strong stomachs and for dyspeptic ones, for women and for men, for kindergartners and for doddering academics." In this course we will seek intellectual nourishment at the banquet of Dante's legacy by closely examining a broad range of responses to the poet—the man and his works—from Giovanni Boccaccio's biography in the late Middle Ages to Roberto Benigni's recent performances of TuttoDante. Between the Dante-inspired works of Boccaccio and Benigni, we will study various, often conflicting, versions of "Dante" in literature, art, film, politics, history, and popular culture. After establishing a foundation for Dante's influence by discussing his political treatise (Monarchia) and selected cantos of his Commedia (most from Inferno), we will embark on an interpretive journey tracing Dante's evolution from a regional to a national (then nationalist) figure before he attained the global status he enjoys today. Giuseppe Mazzini famously called Dante—Ugo Foscolo's "Ghibelline fugitive"—the "Prophet of the Italian Nation": we will accordingly examine appeals to Dante's authority in promoting the liberation and unification of Italy, but we will also consider his role as a beacon of liberty in the United States. Among other areas of inquiry, we will discuss Catholic interpretations of Dante as a neo-Guelph advocate of papal political power, nationalist appropriations of the poet for territorial expansion and military interventions, and recent representations of Dante as an icon of Italian culture on the world stage.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12


Pacifica Black: Colloquium on the Diaspora
Grant details: FA-57763-14
Title: Pacifica Black: Colloquium on the Diaspora
Author: Quito Swan
Abstract: Pacifica Black is focused on the Black Diaspora in the Southern Pacific, particularly across Australia, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, New Zealand, Fiji and New Caledonia. It is an extension of a 2014 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Faculty, in which Professor Quito Swan conducted extensive research in the region. The Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Ocean have historically been in constant political dialogue. Movements for Black Power, sovereignty, decolonization, land rights, self-determination, women’s rights, environmental justice and indigenous culture critically impacted the South Pacific. Yet, this class is not simply about Blacks in the South Pacific. Pacifica Black asks what happens when we centralize—as opposed to marginalize—the Black Pacific experience in how we study the African Diaspora? And if we take the Pacific as a Diasporic “starting place,” major crossroads or “hub,” how does that impact how we view the global black experience, historically speaking and in the contemporary world? Even still, when we comparatively think from the archipelagoes of the Pacific, it puts us in direct conversation with the politics and cultural experience of the Caribbean and Indian Ocean worlds. As such, this class will explore the wider African Diaspora experience but thru the lens of the South Pacific ideas, worldviews and experiences.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Yale University, MUSI 245 Church Music in Early Cities, 700-1700
Grant details: FA-57954-14
Title: Yale University, MUSI 245 Church Music in Early Cities, 700-1700
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Course Description: This course explores the place and purpose of a great variety of Christian liturgical music in the European urban environment, its ever evolving and changing nature, and the economy of music as demonstrated by the practices of lay benefaction, from 700-1700. Expanded Course Description: In medieval and early modern Europe, Christian church music conveyed religious doctrine and often political messages by painting texts with sound, dramatizing liturgical movement or filling space, evoking devotion, memories, or emotions, and mirroring heaven, or hell. Often regulated and mostly fixed in writing (after ca 850), religious liturgical music was usually performed by professionals and taught or composed only by the best of those initiated in that art, even though most levels of society heard it. In this course, we explore Christian music in selected European cities, from 700-1700. We will identify the music heard by different religious communities and social classes, in spaces including cathedrals and parish churches, court and private oratories, monasteries and convents, and guild chapels and hospitals. Particular emphasis will be given to the place and purpose of liturgical music, its ever evolving and changing nature, and the economy of music as demonstrated by the practices of lay benefaction. Finally, we will discuss successes and failures in early church music in the urban environment and consider how these might improve music and its patronage in modern urban churches in the United States.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Music in the Early Modern City, 700-1700 (Univ Maryland College Park, School of Music, Fall 2018)
Grant details: FA-57954-14
Title: Music in the Early Modern City, 700-1700 (Univ Maryland College Park, School of Music, Fall 2018)
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Drawing on substantial scholarship in English, a wide range of historically informed sound recordings, my experience working in archives of this period across Europe (most recently Dresden, Hamburg, Utrecht, Lyon, Reims and others), and my preparations for a new historical performance project, I wish to compare the history of music in different cities in order to determine what is unique to particular cities, regional, or widespread, beginning with Rome (also Jerusalem and Istanbul for comparison), and closing with Venice, Amsterdam, Vienna, Paris, and again Rome. The topics to be discussed will be determined by the class, but can include strictly historical explorations of the professionalism of composing, performers of different ages (choirboys, adults), genders, and social standing; listeners, the spaces of musical performance and their social design, the economy of music: its producers, consumers, and advertisers; ethnomusicological approaches; philosophical approaches to the purpose of music, repetition vs creativity, music as sign, etc.; scientific approaches to music: the makeup of early instruments such as the organ; the use of music theory in education; numbers and notation; symbolism in public and religious music; and a range of other topics, including music manuscripts and archives, the writing, printing, transmission, and marketing of music, chant and liturgy, public ceremonies including processions and theater, and so on. There will be some transcription from early notation and some singing and acting in class. I also hope to organize a visit to the National Gallery of Art and bring in a speaker from the Art Department to discuss music in early paintings.
Year: 2018
Audience: Graduate


Global Film Exhibition
Grant details: FA-58552-15
Title: Global Film Exhibition
Author: Ross Melnick
Abstract: This course examines the industrial, social, and cultural practices employed in global film exhibition venues from the 19th to the 21st century and the local, national, and transnational film cultures developed around moviegoing and other consumption activities related to cinema.
Year: 2016
Audience: Graduate


Moviegoing in America
Grant details: FA-58552-15
Title: Moviegoing in America
Author: Ross Melnick
Abstract: History of film exhibition / moviegoing in the United States from the 19th to the 21st century.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Truth and Authenticity: Heidegger’s Being and Time
Grant details: FB-37593-02
Title: Truth and Authenticity: Heidegger’s Being and Time
Author: Lambert Zuidervaart
Abstract: Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time proposes a holistic conception of truth that can reconnect epistemology with cultural practices and social institutions. Yet his conception seems to make personal or communal “authenticity” the key to attaining truth. The seminar develops a constructive critique of Heidegger’s conception of truth by examining its internal logic and its hermeneutical role.
Year: 2005
Primary URL: http://courses.icscanada.edu/2011/05/truth-and-authenticity-heideggers-being.html
Audience: Graduate


Representing Chicago: the City in Art, Literature, and Music
Grant details: FB-55474-11
Title: Representing Chicago: the City in Art, Literature, and Music
Author: Liesl Olson (guest lecture)
Abstract: Invited guest lecture in course at the University of Chicago. Presentation on periodical culture in Chicago, particularly "little magazines": The Dial, Poetry magazine, The Little Review
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Photogrammetry and 3D modeling: Archaeological recording for buildings and objects
Grant details: FEL-257634-18
Title: Photogrammetry and 3D modeling: Archaeological recording for buildings and objects
Author: Philip Sapirstein
Abstract: While visiting Emory University for giving a public lecture, I developed and delivered a Master Class attended by graduate students and faculty at Emory and nearby universities. The class was a half-day event held on Feb. 1, 2019.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


Ponosakan Topical Dictionary
Grant details: FN-249649-16
Title: Ponosakan Topical Dictionary
Author: Jason William Lobel
Author: Ibrahim Tona
Abstract: Ponosakan - Manado Malay - Indonesian - English Quadrilingual Topical Dictionary
Year: 2017
Audience: General Public


“Multimodal Interaction in Cross-Cultural Perspective”
Grant details: FN-50065-10
Title: “Multimodal Interaction in Cross-Cultural Perspective”
Author: Mark A. Sicoli
Abstract: Face-to-face interaction in multimodal contexts involves the integration of linguistic constructions, voice qualities, gestures and gesticulation, eye gaze, as well as other embodied actions relevant to the ongoing discourse. Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic comparison of talk in interaction raises methodological concerns about just what is comparable across different ethnographic contexts, as well as what means researchers have to recognize actions as socially relevant to the flow of discourse when our own speaker-intuitions are not a viable source of knowledge. In this course we will survey theoretical literature on multimodal interaction and cross-cultural conversation analysis, and build analytical skills working with video data through a focus on less-commonly studied languages recorded in their natural discourse settings. Skills will involve tools for video editing, transcription, and the discourse coding of both verbal and non-verbal semiotic actions. Laboratory “data sessions” will be conducted throughout the term in which class participants will hone analytical skills through the formulation and testing of hypotheses grounded in the turn-by-turn sequences of the transcribed video data. Requirements are engagement of course readings, active participation in class discussions and data sessions, write-ups of data session findings, and a term project that can involve a student’s own data or data from archived sources. This course provides you with tools and experience working with interaction data different from your own language and culture and methods for productive comparison across the typological and cultural variability of the world’s languages.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12


The Medieval Book,
Grant details: FS-50092-06
Title: The Medieval Book,
Author: Deitch, Judith.
Abstract: York University, Department of English, 4th year seminar
Year: 2009
Audience: Undergraduate


Print Culture and History of the Book
Grant details: FS-50092-06
Title: Print Culture and History of the Book
Author: Deitch, Judith
Abstract: York University, Department of English, 4th year seminar 2009-2010, 2010-2011
Year: 2009
Audience: Undergraduate


Book of Faith: Print, Politics, Public Event
Grant details: FS-50092-06
Title: Book of Faith: Print, Politics, Public Event
Author: Krueger, Karl
Abstract: Offered Fall 2009 & Fall 2011). Krauth Memorial + Lutheran Theological Seminary 7301 Germantown Avenue + Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794
Year: 2009
Audience: Graduate


THE BLACK DEATH: PANDEMIC DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL WORLD
Grant details: FS-50283-11
Title: THE BLACK DEATH: PANDEMIC DISEASE IN THE MEDIEVAL WORLD
Author: Monica H. Green
Abstract: The on-going epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease, which originated in West Africa but has now reached Europe and the U.S., has reminded us forcefully of a premodern world many in the modern West had forgotten. Until vaccines, public health interventions, and then antibiotics helped us gained control over the major global infectious diseases, epidemics and pandemics were a fact of life. The most severe pandemic in human history was the Black Death, which struck Afroeurasia towards the end of the Middle Ages. Although total (absolute) mortality would be higher from the 1918-19 flu or the current HIV/AIDS pandemics, as a percentage of population the mortality from the Black Death (estimated between 40 and 60% in many areas) is the highest of any large-scale catastrophe known to humankind. Which makes it disconcerting that we still know so little about it. For example, while its demographic impact in western Europe and parts of the Middle East and North Africa is well known, we still know virtually nothing about its impact in Central Asia (where the microorganism, Yersinia pestis, evolved around 3000 or more years ago) or other parts of Eurasia; it may have even affected parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Genomics studies have now confirmed that Y. pestis was present in people who died during the Black Death, yet we are still unclear why the course of the disease (rate of spread, level of mortality) was so very different from plague epidemics in other periods.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://www.academia.edu/9014151/THE_BLACK_DEATH_PANDEMIC_DISEASE_IN_THE_MEDIEVAL_WORLD_-_syllabus_for_Spring_2015_course_final_
Primary URL Description: HST 304: The Black Death: Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World (Spring 2015 syllabus)
Secondary URL: https://www.academia.edu/11313253/THE_BLACK_DEATH_PANDEMIC_DISEASE_IN_THE_MEDIEVAL_WORLD_-_Reading_Lists_for_Group_Projects_Spring_2015_
Secondary URL Description: HST 304: The Black Death: Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World (Spring 2015 - Student Group Research Assignments)
Audience: Undergraduate


Art in Ancient/Medieval Rome
Grant details: FS-50342-13
Title: Art in Ancient/Medieval Rome
Author: Inglis, Erik
Abstract: Semester-long undergraduate course on art in ancient and medieval Rome offered at Oberlin College in Fall 2015
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Course, Art and Aesthetics in the Third Reich
Grant details: FT-254173-17
Title: Course, Art and Aesthetics in the Third Reich
Author: Morowitz
Abstract: AH 491 H: ART AND AESTHETICS IN THE THIRD REICH One of the most murderous regimes in history, the Third Reich was also one of the most deeply invested in all areas of art and aesthetics. Beyond the realm of producing propaganda in every medium, from posters to film to processions, the Nazis stole or destroyed millions of works of art throughout Europe, planned the redesign of many major cities, held the most highly attended “art” exhibit ever held and attempted to control every facet of the visual arts. This course proposes that we cannot fully understand National Socialism without understanding the aesthetic ideology of the party and of Adolf Hitler and shows how “culture was not only the end to which power should aspire, but the means of achieving it.” Topics to be explored include Hitler’s youth as a struggling painter in Vienna and his rejection from the Art Academy; the systematic expropriation of Jewish art collections and the works of foreign museums; Albert Speer’s plans for a newly designed Berlin; the 1937 Degenerate Art exhibit; the carefully designed parades, processions and rallies; and recent law cases to have stolen works of art restored to their rightful owners. The course ends with a look at memorials and museums dedicated to the Holocaust and ask whether it is possible for art, in any form, to illuminate one of the darkest chapters in human history,
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Crime and Punishment in the Atlantic World
Grant details: FT-255126-17
Title: Crime and Punishment in the Atlantic World
Author: Honor Sachs
Abstract: Course in development
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Lecture on Fascist Imperialism
Grant details: FT-255128-17
Title: Lecture on Fascist Imperialism
Author: Michael Ebner
Abstract: The produce examined Fascist atrocities in Libya.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


“Building Nature: Topics in the Environmental History of Seattle and Spokane—A Curriculum Project for the History of the Pacific Northwest in Washington State Schools”
Grant details: FT-52796-04
Title: “Building Nature: Topics in the Environmental History of Seattle and Spokane—A Curriculum Project for the History of the Pacific Northwest in Washington State Schools”
Author: Klingle, Matthew
Abstract: This project consists of particular episodes in the environmental history of two Washington cities: Seattle and Spokane. The project divides into four sections, each exploring particular facets of city’s history. These sections may be taught together as a unit, or used separately as individual lessons. Questions and teaching suggestions accompany each section, as well as more general activities at the end of the essay. A proper name and subject index is included as a finding aid. A timeline provides important dates in the environmental history of Washington and the Pacific Northwest. Finally, the project includes a bibliography, suggested videos, and on-line resources that teachers may consult for further information.
Year: 2006
Primary URL: http://www.washington.edu/uwired/outreach/cspn/Website/Classroom%20Materials/Curriculum%20Packets/Building%20Nature/Building%20Nature%20Main.html
Primary URL Description: Curriculum packet website
Secondary URL: http://www.washington.edu/uwired/outreach/cspn/Website/index.html
Secondary URL Description: Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, University of Washington, Department of History, primary website
Audience: K - 12


Active Analysis: Intensive
Grant details: FT-54229-06
Title: Active Analysis: Intensive
Author: Carnicke, Sharon Marie
Abstract: A ten day master class on the principles of Active Analysis. Taught at MetodiFestival, Italy, to professional actors from Itatly, Norway, and Britain.
Year: 2011
Audience: Other


In Anthropology of the Middle East at SCU, I required and used the book, DAYS OF REVOLUTION, prepared with the help of the NEH Summer Stipend.
Grant details: FT-59937-12
Title: In Anthropology of the Middle East at SCU, I required and used the book, DAYS OF REVOLUTION, prepared with the help of the NEH Summer Stipend.
Author: Mary Elaine Hegland
Abstract: I used my book, DAYS OF REVOLUTION to point to political dynamics, gender dynamics, changes in socio economics and contact with the outside world as involved in revolutionary readiness, etc.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Fighting Slavery
Grant details: FT-61131-13
Title: Fighting Slavery
Author: Richard Bell
Abstract: New undergraduate course
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


History of Science
Grant details: FT-61504-14
Title: History of Science
Author: Yovanna Pineda
Abstract: In this History of Science course, we analyze the global scientific events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that have had major social and cultural impact in Latin America, the United States, Asia, and Western/Eastern Europe. Such events include Darwin’s theory of natural selection, Eugenics, the “Nuclear Age,” food science, reproductive science, computer science, climate and hydrology science.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


MFJS 4912: Post-Socialist Media and Cultural Change
Grant details: FT-61931-14
Title: MFJS 4912: Post-Socialist Media and Cultural Change
Author: Nadia Kaneva
Abstract: This seminar examines the relationships between media and cultural change in the historical and political context of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union since the end of the Cold War. Adopting a cultural studies perspective, we will explore how the privatization and commercialization of the media industries led to changes in media content and, in turn, helped to bring about major shifts in the cultural and political environment of post-communist societies. The topics we will discuss include: the role of media ownership in journalistic freedom, the rise of advertising and consumerism in the former communist world; the media’s role in changing ideas about national identity, political participation, and gender relations; and the enduring legacies of communism and the Cold War on today’s cultural and political realities in the world.
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Course Enrichment Materials
Grant details: FT-62068-14
Title: Course Enrichment Materials
Author: Aaron Moreno
Abstract: A core curriculum course at Saint Mary's University, entitled "Foundations of Civilization," gives professors the opportunity to craft unique history courses that address historical periods of significant cultural interaction. My "Foundations of Civilization" course focuses on the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim worlds of the medieval Mediterranean. Thanks to my archival research, I can give more nuanced lectures about border regions of the Christian-ruled and Muslim world realms. I can also show students fascinating pictures of manuscripts with Greek, Latin, and Arabic signatures - a perfect example of the mixing of cultures.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Poetry as a Form of Life, Life as a Form of Poetry
Grant details: FV-50118-06
Title: Poetry as a Form of Life, Life as a Form of Poetry
Author: Helen Vendler
Abstract: Course taught high school English teachers how to become better teachers and readers of poetry.
Year: 2007
Audience: Other


Poetry as a Form of Life, Life as a Form of Poetry
Grant details: FV-50155-07
Title: Poetry as a Form of Life, Life as a Form of Poetry
Author: Helen Vendler
Abstract: Course taught high school English teachers how to become better teachers and readers of poetry.
Year: 2008
Audience: Other


Translating Beowulf for the Highschool Classrom
Grant details: FV-50353-12
Title: Translating Beowulf for the Highschool Classrom
Author: Sally Pearsal Southall
Abstract: A power point comparing various translations of Beowulf which then works through the paleography for all students to try translating various excerpts on their own and to appreciate the difficult decisions translators must make.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12


Existentialism Webpages
Grant details: FV-50357-13
Title: Existentialism Webpages
Author: Multiple
Abstract: Various webpages for books that could be used to teach Existentialism in schools were developed by participants in the seminar and posted on the EdSitement site as well as plato-philosophy.org.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.plato-philosophy.org/toolkitcategory/existentialism/
Secondary URL: http://edsitement.neh.gov
Audience: K - 12


Appendix: Course and Curricular Materials
Grant details: FW-50198-10
Title: Appendix: Course and Curricular Materials
Author: Kristin Koptiuch
Abstract: Supporting course materials for Final Report for NEH Grant # 20091001-FW. Contains twelve supporting documents, including syllabus, migration profiles of four world regions, course unit, sample assignment instructions, student evaluations of the course, and flyers. I see no way to upload these here, so I will append them to the Final Report.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://crossingthevalley.com
Primary URL Description: Crossing the Valley: Interviews with Immigrants & Refugees in Metropolitan Phoenix 2004-2013. Digital portfolios created by students for Migration & Culture of selected course assignments, including final interview project telling stories of global immigrants and refugees living in metropolitan Phoenix.
Secondary URL: http://migration2011.jimdo.com/
Secondary URL Description: Web site for Migration & Culture 2011. Digital portfolios created by students from the semester immediately following the fellowship period. NOTE: These web sites are addressed to the General Public--but the buttons below keep reverting to K-12 only, no matter what other button i select.
Audience: General Public


Philosophy of Crime and Punishment
Grant details: FW-50288-11
Title: Philosophy of Crime and Punishment
Author: David Lefkowitz
Abstract: Syllabus and curricular materials
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://philosophy.richmond.edu/_common_KP3/files/faculty-staff-bio/as/lefkowitz-syllabus.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to PDF containing course materials
Audience: Undergraduate


HIST 286/ARHA 264 Photography and Law: Mugshots, Privacy and Publicity, Obscenity, Evidence
Grant details: FZ-231520-15
Title: HIST 286/ARHA 264 Photography and Law: Mugshots, Privacy and Publicity, Obscenity, Evidence
Author: Jennifer Tucker
Abstract: Course Description: This seminar is designed as an introduction to the major developments in the legal history of photography in transatlantic (US-UK especially) society from the first law cases involving photography in 1840 through to contemporary legal debates about such topics as cameras in the courtroom, sexting, surveillance, photographing police, dash cam and body cam videos, admissibility of photographs as evidence, obscenity and moral boundaries of subject matter, and copyright. A range of secondary historical and theoretical writings will anchor the discussions, but the course will focus primarily on student analysis and interpretation of primary and archival sources (texts of legal cases, law reviews and dissertation, news articles and documentary and video footage). Students will gain knowledge of how legal history has shaped the history of photography, and new perspectives on the historical origins of contemporary issues in photography and digital imaging. It should be of interest especially to history majors and non-majors who are interested in law, photography, and culture and will also contribute to the "Visual and Material Studies" module in History.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Literature in the Public Interest -- Muckraking and American Realism
Grant details: FZ-231666-16
Title: Literature in the Public Interest -- Muckraking and American Realism
Author: Carla Kaplan
Abstract: This course, on the “long Twentieth Century” of American realism and muckraking will consider the American muckraking tradition, as a literary tradition, with particular attention to the ways in which muckraking writers have employed rhetorical and realist techniques to persuade readers and engage audiences. Our discussion will begin with the question of why slave narrators are not considered muckrakers, using “cultural work” as an analytical framing device, and continue with some of the earliest works of the accepted tradition of American muckraking, such as Nellie Bly’s “madhouse” exposé (1887), Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives (1890) and the American muckrakers associated with McClure’s magazine: Upton Sinclair, Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens, and Ida Tarbell. Attention to a second generation of mid-century muckrakers will begin with social protest works which expose social conditions but are considered far from muckraking; Fannie Hurst’s sentimental stories (1916; 1925) and Richard Wright’s classic work of realism, Native Son (1940). With those works as a backdrop, our reading will then track two very different social activists, Rachel Carson (widely credited with instigating the environmental movement) and radical writer Jessica Mitford (whose advocacy of working and poor people earned her the honorific “Queen of the Muckrakers”). Our reading will continue with more recent works of popular muckraking, such as Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed (2001), Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation (2001), and Naomi Klein’s No Logo (2009), and conclude with issues raised by the recent case of The WikiLeaks Files (2015).
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Literature in the Public Interest -- Muckraking and American Realism
Grant details: FZ-231666-16
Title: Literature in the Public Interest -- Muckraking and American Realism
Author: Carla Kaplan
Abstract: This course, on the “long Twentieth Century” of American realism and muckraking will consider the American muckraking tradition, as a literary tradition, with particular attention to the ways in which muckraking writers have employed rhetorical and realist techniques to persuade readers and engage audiences. Our discussion will begin with the question of why slave narrators are not considered muckrakers, using “cultural work” as an analytical framing device, and continue with some of the earliest works of the accepted tradition of American muckraking, such as Nellie Bly’s “madhouse” exposé (1887), Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives (1890) and the American muckrakers associated with McClure’s magazine: Upton Sinclair, Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens, and Ida Tarbell. Attention to a second generation of mid-century muckrakers will begin with social protest works which expose social conditions but are considered far from muckraking; Fannie Hurst’s sentimental stories (1916; 1925) and Richard Wright’s classic work of realism, Native Son (1940). With those works as a backdrop, our reading will then track two very different social activists, Rachel Carson (widely credited with instigating the environmental movement) and radical writer Jessica Mitford (whose advocacy of working and poor people earned her the honorific “Queen of the Muckrakers”). Our reading will continue with more recent works of popular muckraking, such as Barbara Ehrenreich’s Nickel and Dimed (2001), Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation (2001), and Naomi Klein’s No Logo (2009), and conclude with issues raised by the recent case of The WikiLeaks Files (2015).
Year: 2016
Audience: Graduate


RELI 10 What is Religion? Introduction to Religious Studies
Grant details: FZ-261493-18
Title: RELI 10 What is Religion? Introduction to Religious Studies
Author: Julie Byrne
Abstract: Revised syllabus for intro to religious studies class included material on and discussion of 9/11 as informed by my research.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


RELI 33 Religion and Business
Grant details: FZ-261493-18
Title: RELI 33 Religion and Business
Author: Julie Byrne
Abstract: New course on Religion and Business that will include material on 9/11, the world of finance, and Catholic families as informed by my research.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


The Humanities and the Experience of War
Grant details: GA-254198-16
Title: The Humanities and the Experience of War
Author: National Resource Center for Osher Institutes
Abstract: The following material is designed to support community-led discussion groups in exploring the experience of modern U.S. American wars from the Vietnam era through the present. By reviewing letters, memoirs, fiction and film, groups can explore how these modern wars both reflect and challenge the American tradition. They can also examine how individuals have met the challenge of communicating these unique experiences to a broader circle through personal and public work. As these community groups may include participants from a variety of backgrounds and generations, and both veterans and the general public, discussion leaders and are encouraged to modify the materials to best meet the interest of the members.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://nrc.northwestern.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/The-Humanities-and-the-Experience-of-War-Workbook-Final.pdf
Primary URL Description: The following material is designed to support community-led discussion groups in exploring the experience of modern U.S. American wars from the Vietnam era through the present. By reviewing letters, memoirs, fiction and film, groups can explore how these modern wars both reflect and challenge the American tradition. They can also examine how individuals have met the challenge of communicating these unique experiences to a broader circle through personal and public work. As these community groups may include participants from a variety of backgrounds and generations, and both veterans and the general public, discussion leaders and are encouraged to modify the materials to best meet the interest of the members.
Audience: General Public


Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow Educational Curriculum
Grant details: GI-259343-18
Title: Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow Educational Curriculum
Author: Marjorie Waters
Author: Dylan Yeats
Abstract: These materials, produced in connection with the 2018 exhibition Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow, explore the contested efforts toward full citizenship and racial equality for African Americans that transpired in the fifty years after the Civil War. The period between the end of slavery in 1865 and the end of World War I in 1919 saw African Americans champion their rights as the “separate but equal” age of Jim Crow began. Examining both the activism for and opposition to black citizenship rights, the works of art, political cartoons, photographs, documents, primary accounts, and timelines in this curriculum underscore how ideas of freedom and citizenship were redefined by government and citizen action, and challenged by legal discrimination and violence. TOPICS: Reconstruction, Jim Crow, citizenship rights, voting rights, segregation, lynching, sharecropping, disenfranchisement, exodusters, racial stereotypes, Lost Cause mythology, Confederate monuments, white supremacy, black activism, the NAACP, the Great Migration, military service STRUCTURE: three units—Reconstruction, 1865-1877; The Rise of Jim Crow, 1877-1900; and Challenging Jim Crow, 1900-1919
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.nyhistory.org/education/professional-learning/curriculum-library
Primary URL Description: New-York Historical Society Free Curriculum Library
Audience: K - 12


HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Interpretive Plan
Grant details: GI-50074-09
Title: HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Interpretive Plan
Author: Margaret L. Vetare
Author: Jessa J. Krick
Author: Kathleen Eagen Johnson
Abstract: The attached Interpretive Plan has been created to serve as one of the primary training tools for interpreters whose job it is to communicate the history of Montgomery Place to the visiting public. Like most historic sites, Montgomery Place has the potential for exploring many different themes or points in time and for using different methods to convey that information. However, a particular set of themes and methods has been established for Montgomery Place and it is essential that all interpretation should present a consistent message to the visitor. The Interpretive Plan is designed to explain the themes and background information for each area, or station, of the museum. The Interpretive Plan also states the desired learner outcomes (DLOs) we hope will be achieved by visitors at each station, and, where the experience is interpreter-guided as opposed to self-guided, provides suggestions for visitor participation opportunities (VPOs) and dialogue questions in some of the stations. The Interpretive Plan does not attempt to cover all the information that is needed for the effective presentation of Montgomery Place’s themes. Instead, it is one component among several training documents and resources that are important for a thorough understanding of the site and each of its areas. Many people helped in the creation of the Installation Plan, in particular Kathleen Eagen Johnson and Jessa J. Krick. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Installation Plan
Grant details: GI-50074-09
Title: HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Installation Plan
Author: Kathleen Eagen Johnson
Author: Jessa J. Krick
Author: Margaret L. Vetare
Abstract: This Installation Plan for Montgomery Place focuses on rooms and spaces that will be interpreted as part of the mansion tour. The Installation Plan works in conjunction with the Interpretive Plan. It does not attempt to cover all the information that is needed for the effective presentation of Montgomery Place’s themes. Instead, it is one component among several training documents and resources that are important for a thorough understanding of the site and each of its areas. The photographs included suggest the general atmosphere of the mansion’s interiors and represent many of the objects on display. For a complete list of objects installed in each room, as well as complete documentary photography, see the corresponding set of Montgomery Place Object Information Books. The Installation Plan also contains information about the sixteen interpretive panels installed throughout the Montgomery Place landscape. Many people helped in the creation of the Installation Plan, in particular Margaret L. Vetare and Jessa J. Krick. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Interpreter Training Guide
Grant details: GI-50074-09
Title: HHV - Montgomery Place American Arcadia - Interpreter Training Guide
Author: Margaret L. Vetare
Author: Kathleen Eagen Johnson
Abstract: This Interpreter Training Guide serves as a road map for Montgomery Place tour guides. It incorporates themes of the new interpretation, best practices for museum interpretation, and a recommended reading list.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


Taking Action
Grant details: GI-50192-10
Title: Taking Action
Author: Adam Davis
Abstract: Edited by Adam Davis. The Great Books Foundation, 2012. Taking Action inspires a wide range of service professionals to take a step back from their daily work, and think and talk to one another about their values, aspirations, and challenges. Fifty-five short readings and six visual images provide thought-provoking discussion material for educators, social workers, community organizers, law enforcement personnel, medical professionals, and others who work to make the world a better place. The anthology contains texts and images that address the following six topics: Need and Care Teaching and Learning Difference and Connection Serving and Protecting Action and Outcomes Here and Now In addition to 55 texts and 6 images, Taking Action provides discussion questions and opening activities for each selection, and tips for conducting reflective discussions.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://civicreflection.org/resources/publications/taking-action
Audience: K - 12


Revolution! The Atlantic World Reborn
Grant details: GI-50384-11
Title: Revolution! The Atlantic World Reborn
Author: New-York Historical Society
Abstract: 2001, New-York Historical Society. U.S. Department of Education and Cultural (URR) Program. Classroom Materials for the Exhibition 1- MS, 1- KSM, 1- library, 2- common room (inside accompanying book)
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/revolution-the-atlantic-world-reborn
Audience: K - 12


Lift Every Voice Reader and Discussion Guide
Grant details: GW-259323-18
Title: Lift Every Voice Reader and Discussion Guide
Author: Kevin Young, Editor
Abstract: The Reader will be a resource for libraries and other institutions participating in Lift Every Voice to offer public programming in their local communities. Organized by the project's featured humanities themes, the Reader will present select poems from the anthology along with contextual aids and discussion questions that will promote inquiry and conversation and will facilitate comparison of historical and contemporary African American poetic expression. Additionally, the Reader will include a brief chronology of the African American poetic tradition and suggestions for further reading.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://www.africanamericanpoetry.org
Primary URL Description: The Reader will be available for free download on the project website, africanamericanpoetry.org.
Audience: General Public


American Creed: Writing Our Future Project
Grant details: GW-259383-18
Title: American Creed: Writing Our Future Project
Author: National Writing Project
Abstract: The American Creed broadcast on PBS (February 27, 2018) launched a robust public engagement campaign beginning with this youth publishing opportunity, and including community conversations, classroom activities, an essay contest, and a suite of digital shorts—all designed to foster reflection and dialogue about freedom, fairness, opportunity, and the meaning of citizenship.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/projects/125
Primary URL Description: This URL is the landing page to navigate the National Writing Project's "American Creed: Writing Our Future Project".
Secondary URL: https://writingourfuture.nwp.org/americancreed/pages/start-writing
Secondary URL Description: This URL links to five prompts available as an open invitation for youth to write in response to American Creed.
Audience: K - 12


Educator Resources for American Creed
Grant details: GW-259383-18
Title: Educator Resources for American Creed
Author: Facing History and Ourselves
Abstract: In the film American Creed, former US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David M. Kennedy come together from remarkably different life experiences, backgrounds and points of view to explore American ideals and identity. Their spirited inquiry frames the stories of a wide range of citizen-activists striving to realize their own visions of America’s promise across deep divides. Just as the film frames the stories of different kinds of activists who wrestle with America’s promise, Facing History hopes to inspire young people to engage deeply in a conversation about who we are, and who we want to be.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.facinghistory.org/american-creed
Primary URL Description: This URL is a landing page for Facing History and Ourselves' American Creed curriculum and resources.
Secondary URL: http://https://www.facinghistory.org/american-creed/for-educators
Secondary URL Description: This URL includes the four lesson plans designed by Facing History and Ourselves to support educators to embrace the larger questions featured in American Creed in their classrooms.
Audience: K - 12


Workshop: Pedagogy and the Digital Humanities
Grant details: HAA-256146-17
Title: Workshop: Pedagogy and the Digital Humanities
Author: Suzanne Churchill
Author: Susan Rosenbaum
Abstract: Short presentation on the Index of Modernist Magazines as a model of sustainable DH research involving undergraduates, followed by design thinking session for participants to develop their own ideas for collaborative DH projects.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://www.duq.edu/assets/Documents/english/_pdf/DH%20SERIES%20EVENTS.pdf
Primary URL Description: program of events, including workshop.
Secondary URL: http://https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1EgqiRJISvjLMure6TKJlSzJrksjqoaW5J5dBj1Tpv2k/edit?usp=sharing
Secondary URL Description: Google slides used in workshop.
Audience: Graduate


Biography Project - cross institutional collaboration
Grant details: HAA-256146-17
Title: Biography Project - cross institutional collaboration
Author: Susan Rosenbaum
Author: Linda Kinnahan
Author: Suzanne Churchill
Author: Emily McGinn
Author: Gesina Philips
Author: Sundi Richard
Abstract: During the fall of 2017, Rosenbaum, Kinnahan, and Churchill each taught a course relevant to the project, giving us an opportunity to pilot a cross-institutional project with students and digital librarians at our respective schools (Emily McGinn, UGA; Gesina Philips, Duquesne; Sundi Richard, Davidson). The “Biography Project,” as it came to be called, involved students at Davidson, Duquesne, and UGA in researching and writing short biographies of figures connected to the historic avant-garde (chiefly Dada, Futurism, Surrealism) who were associated with Loy. A truly collaborative effort, we established and followed a shared template for the project and involved students in peer-reviews of at least two biographies authored by students from other schools. In workshops conducted by digital librarians at each school, students considered the technical and conceptual particularities of gathering and “cleaning” data, writing for a digital platform, and conducting peer review through the open platform Hypothes.is.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://loybioproject.wordpress.com/
Primary URL Description: This website (not open to the public) was used for students to post their biography drafts and peer critique one another's writing using a Hypothes.is group we created for the occasion.
Secondary URL: http://courses.suzannechurchill.com/eng394-f17/assignments/biography-project/
Secondary URL Description: This is the assignment given to students at Davidson taking Suzanne Churchill's class ENG 394: The Avant-Garde. Assignments for students at UGA and Duquesne were nearly identical.
Audience: Undergraduate


Art and Art History for Children: Indigenous Art
Grant details: HAA-261214-18
Title: Art and Art History for Children: Indigenous Art
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: In "Art Workshops for Children," Herve Tullet maintains that “[c]hildren are masters of creation—they are very intuitive and it is this instinct and their unedited ability to create art that [is inspiring] . . . collective energy and a great group dynamic is a result in itself. [Teaching art classes] with multiple participants creates an energy that empowers each artist to do new and unexpected things. When we improvise as a group, we work from a place of freedom, where all mistakes are permissible and there’s no such thing” as wrong. Barbara Rucci makes the case that learning about art develops children’s intellectual capacity in all realms: “the value of exposing your children to a world of art runs deep . . . you are helping them strengthen the connection between hemispheres of the brain.” In this class we will read texts on art history and create lesson plans to prepare you to teach children about art, focusing particularly on Indigenous culture. We will be making art in class together to exercise our own creativity and experience the energy and freedom of art, while learning about Indigenous history and culture. You will leave this class with a large number of lesson plans, experience in making and teaching art, a strong grasp of art history globally, and increased knowledge in teaching Indigenous art history.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Course Materials for Teaching Introductory Programming for Text Analysis
Grant details: HD-228732-15
Title: Course Materials for Teaching Introductory Programming for Text Analysis
Author: LeBlanc, M.D.
Abstract: Five assignments in a semester-long CS-1-like course named Computing for Poets to introduce students to programming within one area of the digital humanities: the application of computing to the study of digitized texts. The course exposes students to leading markup languages (HTML, CSS, XML) and teaches computer programming (Python) as a vehicle to explore and “data mine” digitized texts. Programming facilitates top-down thinking and practice with computational thinking skills such as problem decomposition, algorithmic thinking, and experimental design - topics that humanities students in our experience rarely see. A learning objective for students in this course is to articulate how computational analyses of digitized texts enables both a “close reading” of a single text and as well as a “distant reading” of many texts across time. The goal for each student is to master enough programming to modify digitized texts to help in a computational experiment that explores a question of a text or set of texts.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://www.engage-csedu.org/search/site/LeBlanc
Audience: Undergraduate


ODU Ditance Learning Web Conference and Video Launch Pages
Grant details: HD-50088-07
Title: ODU Ditance Learning Web Conference and Video Launch Pages
Author: Schulman, Peter
Author: Marken, Minori
Author: Steitz, Kirstin
Author: Sewick, Andrew
Abstract: Recorded Course Content (RCC). This project is a continuation of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant-funded research study on Academic Podcasting by Betty Rose Facer, Dr. M'hammed Abdous, and Dr. Cherng-Jyh at Old Dominion University that provides students with the opportunity to (re)listen to course content as a review tool in order to hone their language skills development. It serves as a model replicated by faculty members in the Department of World Languages and Cultures that is contributing to a rich repository of resource materials for our students in French, German, Hebrew, Japanese, and Spanish.
Year: 2016
Secondary URL: https://online.odu.edu/video/class-archives
Audience: Undergraduate


Digital Publishing
Grant details: HD-51088-10
Title: Digital Publishing
Author: Cheryl E. Ball
Abstract: This course is all about digital publishing, with a particular focus on digital media scholarship — a niche area of scholarly publishing that will allow us to focus on a lot of cutting-edge issues and concerns that relate to all kinds of publishing, both print and digital and linear and nonlinear. We will cover all of the following topics in perhaps random but always-overlapping ways: scholarship, peer-review, metadata, open-access, globalization, copyright, creative commons, media, materiality, mode, database, distribution, Deep Web, labor, economy, funding models, sustainability, workflow, reading patterns, research, reader tools, accessibility, usability, Internet, Web, HTML, XML, Dublin Core, FTP, online communication, open-source, Open Journal Systems, OAI-PMH, rhetoric, technology, pedagogy Our main project will be to work on creating metadata for an actual publication, Kairos (the scholarly journal I edit), which recently won a $50,000 NEH grant to build a new content-management system for similar publication venues. One of the most important parts of this new CMS will be the journal’s ability to offer robust metadata for readers, librarians, etc. But we need to build the metadata so they will come. This project is resume-worthy, so get your metadata hats on!
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.ceball.com/classes/354/spring11/
Primary URL Description: Course blog/syllabus for English 354: Digital Publishing at Illinois State University
Audience: Undergraduate


Case Study for the course Introduction to Digital Humanities, HSE, Moscow
Grant details: HD-51128-10
Title: Case Study for the course Introduction to Digital Humanities, HSE, Moscow
Author: Mikhail Gronas
Author: Roman Leibov
Author: Anastassia Bonch-Osmolovskaya
Author: Anna Rumshisky
Abstract: The project has been used as a case study in the course "Digital Humanities", Department of Computational Linguistics, Division of Philology, Higher School of Economics, Moscow
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12


GeoHistorian Curriculum
Grant details: HD-51129-10
Title: GeoHistorian Curriculum
Author: Mark van 't Hooft
Abstract: Four-week curricular unit for K-12 teachers and students that teaches students how to create digital stories about local history in four steps: 1. digital storytelling 2. historical research 3. storyboarding and script writing 4. creating the digital story The curriculum and its support materials are available online, free of charge.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://www.rcet.org/geohistorian/curriculum
Primary URL Description: GeoHistorian Project page where curriculum can be downloaded
Secondary URL: http://geohistoriandemo.wikispaces.com
Secondary URL Description: GeoHistorian demo wiki (curricular support materials)
Audience: K - 12


Learn about Kent's History Using QR Codes and Your Mobile Phone!
Grant details: HD-51129-10
Title: Learn about Kent's History Using QR Codes and Your Mobile Phone!
Author: Mark van 't Hooft
Abstract: Two-part brochure that educates the general public about QR codes, how to access their embedded information, and how they were used in the GeoHistorian Project. The brochures also show the locations of the 29 markers installed at historical sites in Kent, Ohio. Part 1 of the brochure contains a scavenger hunt for 10 of the historical sites
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://www.rcet.org/geohistorian/publications-presentations/
Primary URL Description: Publications and Presentations page of the GeoHistorian Project website. Digital versions of the brochure can be downloaded here.
Secondary URL: http://www.rcet.org/geohistorian/2012/05/01/geohistorian-brochures/
Secondary URL Description: Blog post announcing the brochures, with links to digital versions.
Audience: General Public


DTC 354 Digital Storytelling
Grant details: HD-51330-11
Title: DTC 354 Digital Storytelling
Author: Greg Shine
Author: Dene Grigar
Abstract: DTC 354 Digital Storytelling is using the Women & Domestic Life at the Village of Fort Vancouver module as a case study for the semester. Class members are helping to create content for the module as they learn the art and strategies of digital storytelling.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://dtc-wsuv.org/wp/fvm/dtc-354/
Audience: Undergraduate


Teaching App Design and Development
Grant details: HD-51330-11
Title: Teaching App Design and Development
Author: Will Leurs
Author: Dene Grigar
Author: John Barber
Author: Brett Oppegaard
Abstract: A growing area of interest in the digital humanities is the mobile environment, especially projects that take advantage of the affordances of smart phones and tablets. This course, derived from the Mobile Tech Research Initiative of The Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver (http://van-dtc356.vancouver.wsu.edu/appcamp/), is aimed at assisting participants to: 1) conceptualize the space and special features of mobile devices; 2) develop the architecture, design, and multimedia content production for a mobile project; and 3) understand the coding and programming requirements for mobile devices. By the end of the course, participants will have the information they need for creating projects for the mobile environment and will have completed steps toward the development of their own projects
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://dtc-wsuv.org/wp/dhsi/
Primary URL Description: This is the website for the course.
Secondary URL: http://dhsi.org/courses.php
Secondary URL Description: This is the website for the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria
Audience: Graduate


Spanish Intellectual Climate: Developing the Gnovis Prototype
Grant details: HD-51343-11
Title: Spanish Intellectual Climate: Developing the Gnovis Prototype
Author: Lucia Binotti
Author: Chris Smith
Abstract: “The Intellectual Climate of Spain” is a laboratory where students will be gathering and organizing materials to create a prototype version of a software tool, Gnovis, for visualizing entities and the relationships between them in well-defined domains of knowledge. We will generate our own highly detailed dataset for a limited subset of Spanish Renaissance literature. This detailed example will help us understand the types of interface necessary to allow navigation through the many attributes and connections between the entities under consideration. In addition, the seminar will serve as a crucible for testing our ideas about developing different modes of visualization, and about the usefulness of including or excluding certain attributes.
Year: 2011
Audience: Graduate


Immigrant Stories for College Instructors
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories for College Instructors
Author: Elizabeth Venditto and Erika Lee
Abstract: Story-making curriculum for college instructors using the Immigrant Stories website, http://immigrantstories.umn.edu
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1eIDteoJgugMDRxdzZwRkd5Mms/view://
Audience: Undergraduate


Immigrant Stories for English Language Learners
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories for English Language Learners
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Story-making curriculum for teachers of English language learners using the Immigrant Stories website, http://immigrantstories.umn.edu
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1eIDteoJgugSTY3eTRwdUw0WW8/view
Audience: Undergraduate


Immigrant Stories for High School Instructors
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories for High School Instructors
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Story-making curriculum for high school teachers using the Immigrant Stories website, http://immigrantstories.umn.edu
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1eIDteoJgugb1NyWHl1TjNoS0E/view
Audience: K - 12


Immigrant Stories for Public Workshops
Grant details: HK-230916-15
Title: Immigrant Stories for Public Workshops
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Abstract: Story-making curriculum for public workshop facilitators using the Immigrant Stories website, http://immigrantstories.umn.edu
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1eIDteoJgugYzhEYlY5WGlVWXc/view
Audience: General Public


Early Modern Mobility: Knowledge, Communication, and Transportation, 1500-1800
Grant details: HT-251006-16
Title: Early Modern Mobility: Knowledge, Communication, and Transportation, 1500-1800
Author: Rachel Midura
Abstract: Research team received $50,000 grant from The UPS Endowment Fund for Transportation, Logistics and Urban Issues or multi-university research and curriculum development. The history of roads and the history of postal systems are often invisible elements of the past because they seem so obvious. Roads lead somewhere but not everywhere; they make local, regional, and long-distance communities, economies, systems of governance, and human mobility possible. Yet we do not often think that they have a history. Similarly, despite the existence of postal museums in different parts of the world, including the National Postal Museum at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., most people never contemplate how postal systems came into being. In fact, the creation and control of infrastructure providing reliable delivery of mail is a key means of fostering and controlling society across distance. It requires logistical planning, an understanding of how people and things move through space and the rate at which they can travel by various means of transportation. During the early modern period (1500-1800), individuals and communities experienced dramatic changes in communication and transportation, establishing practices, institutions, and infrastructure that opened up new political and economic possibilities, and changed the way people understood the world.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://emmobility.github.io/emm_site/related/description.html
Audience: Undergraduate


Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data
Grant details: HT-251006-16
Title: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data
Author: Rachel Midura
Abstract: Co-design and teach digital humanities course with Prof. Giovanna Ceserani with grants from Stanford Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and Department for Languages and Comparative Literature
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://explorecourses.stanford.edu/search?view=catalog&filter-coursestatus-Active=on&q=CLASSICS%20115:%20Mapping%20the%20Grand%20Tour:%20Digital%20Methods%20for%20Historical%20Data&academicYear=20182019
Audience: Undergraduate


Network Narratives
Grant details: HT-251006-16
Title: Network Narratives
Author: Jillian Linster
Abstract: This honors seminar course at the University of South Dakota leads students through an introduction to network analysis in the humanities, with a focus on the plethora of exciting and accessible new tools for network analysis that have been developed in recent years. Network Narratives will expose students to theories about and approaches for conducting network analysis in a variety of fields; guide them in the basic use of some of the tools available online for identifying, visualizing, and analyzing networks; and foster discussion and interpretation of the role and impact of networks in our academic, professional, and personal lives. Major assignments include data cleaning and data visualization exercises and an essay on network analysis.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Digital Texts and Textual Data: A Pedagogical Anthology
Grant details: HT-256977-17
Title: Digital Texts and Textual Data: A Pedagogical Anthology
Author: Lauren Coats
Author: Emily McGinn
Abstract: This collection features pedagogical artifacts created by the participants of the 2018-2019 NEH Institute for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities, “Textual Data and Digital Texts in the Undergraduate Classroom.” The artifacts--assignments, syllabi, sample student work, rubrics, workshops, and more--are grouped thematically in four sections: digital exhibits and narratives, textual analysis, distant reading and data visualization, and data-driven research. Each artifact begins with an overview in which the creator summarizes the artifact type, the intended audience, the time required, and the DH method and tool used, and provides a brief description of the artifact.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://dhlvideo.libs.uga.edu/neh_PDFs/DigitalTextsAndTextualData.pdf
Audience: Undergraduate


Computer vision and machine learning
Grant details: HT-50046-11
Title: Computer vision and machine learning
Author: Kenton McHenry
Abstract: Course material for computer vision and machine learning
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://isda.ncsa.illinois.edu/~kmchenry/tmp/IADTH/Lectures/
Audience: K - 12


Social network analysis and visualizations/3d Visuals
Grant details: HT-50046-11
Title: Social network analysis and visualizations/3d Visuals
Author: Michael Simeone
Abstract: Course material for social network analysis and visualization
Year: 2012
Secondary URL: http://isda.ncsa.illinois.edu/~mpsimeon/notes/
Audience: K - 12


"EEBO Histories and Research Strategies"
Grant details: HT-50092-14
Title: "EEBO Histories and Research Strategies"
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: Guest Lecture for LC 343: Pop Culture and "Bibliodigigogy," with Kristen Abbott Bennett (course co-taught with Janelle Jenstad and Kim McLean-Fiander of the Map of Early Modern London, or MOEML), Stonehill College, Easton, MA. 22 March 2016.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://kristenabbottbennett.com/2016/01/20/pop-culture-and-bibliodigigogy-in-early-modern-england-class-starts-tomorrow/
Audience: Undergraduate


"Migration and Digital Storytelling Toolkit"
Grant details: LD-234222-16
Title: "Migration and Digital Storytelling Toolkit"
Author: Saengmany Ratsabout
Author: Erika Lee
Author: Elizabeth Venditto
Author: Bryan Pekel
Abstract: This toolkit was produced for the four-day summer institute for instructors by the same name with particular emphasis on how to create and produce an Immigrant Story. Within the toolkit, educators will find the information they need to produce their own Immigrant Story, as well as to teach students how to create their own. Sections of the toolkit include: how to write a script for an Immigrant Story; the importance of photos, video, and music to the final product; how to find media with a Creative Commons license; the importance of story-boarding; recording and editing audio using Audacity; importing audio and other media into iMovie; post production tips and tricks; and how to submit Immigrant Stories to the IHRC.
Year: 2016
Audience: Other


Violence and Belonging: : The 14th Amendment and American Literature (a reading & discussion series)
Grant details: LD-234311-16
Title: Violence and Belonging: : The 14th Amendment and American Literature (a reading & discussion series)
Author: Maine Humanities Council with Eden Osucha, Karen Eger, and Marcela Peres
Abstract: In examining the legacies of the Fourteenth Amendment for the nation’s literary history, this reading and discussion series looks at books that address issues of diversity, identity, and inequality in exploring how, for many Americans, the promise of citizenship falls short of their reality.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://mainehumanities.org/programs/lets-talk/violence-and-belonging-the-14th-amendment-and-american-literature/
Primary URL Description: This is a link to the Maine Humanities Council's webs page with the full description of the series.
Audience: General Public


Race & Justice in America- a 14th Amendment related reading and discussion series for libraries
Grant details: LD-234311-16
Title: Race & Justice in America- a 14th Amendment related reading and discussion series for libraries
Author: Maine Humanities Council with Leroy Rowe and Elizabeth Hartsig and Holly Williams
Abstract: This series explores the complex, and often uneasy, relationship between black Americans and the American justice system. Developed by project scholar Leroy Rowe, Assistant Professor of African American History and Politics, University of Southern Maine, and librarian consultants Elizabeth Hartsig (Portland Public Library) and Holly Williams (Pittsfield Public Library), the books selected for Race and Justice in America provide historical analyses of selected events, court rulings, and public policies that help to explain the black American struggle for citizenship, civil rights, and equal treatment under the laws. Race and Justice in America also explores the changing boundaries and content of state and national citizenship. The core questions that the series engages are: how was membership in the social and political community defined for African Americans and whites in the United States? How have those definitions changed over time? And in what ways did individuals and communities exercise rights as citizens and experience those rights differently?
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://mainehumanities.org/programs/lets-talk/race-and-justice-in-america/
Primary URL Description: This links to Maine Humanities Council's web page with a full description of the series
Audience: General Public


Pioneers & Frontiers : a reading and discussion series raising issues related to the 14th Amendment and its effects on our lives
Grant details: LD-234311-16
Title: Pioneers & Frontiers : a reading and discussion series raising issues related to the 14th Amendment and its effects on our lives
Author: Maine Humanities Council with Mary Alice Crosby and Julia Walkling
Abstract: Pioneers and Frontiers is a reading and discussion series designed for participants in the Maine Humanities Council’s NEW BOOKS, NEW READERS program: low-literacy adults who are working to improve their reading and those who are not in the habit of reading. The books are carefully chosen from the best of children’s literature to relate to participants’ own lives and to broaden their perspectives in discussions led by a humanities scholar/facilitator. It is an important part of the program that participants receive the books to keep. Participants come from adult basic education, GED programs, Literacy Volunteers, family literacy programs, and correctional facilities around the state.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://mainehumanities.org/programs/new-books-new-readers-full-series-list/pioneers-and-frontiers/
Primary URL Description: This is a link to the Maine Humanities Council webpage with the description of the series
Audience: Other


NEH Bridging Cultures Projects 2015-2017: World Religions Course Modules
Grant details: ME-228623-15
Title: NEH Bridging Cultures Projects 2015-2017: World Religions Course Modules
Author: Edward E. Curtis IV
Author: Arthur Farnsley II
Author: John Cooney
Author: Jonathan Arbuckle
Author: Al Atkins
Author: Rachel Barrett Knight
Author: Courtland Blade
Author: Jeff Dodge
Author: Amy Guess
Author: Doug Hammerling
Author: • Audrey Jefferson
Author: Barry LeBlanc
Author: Tanya Martin
Author: Josh Phillippe
Author: Janet Rhodes-Carlson
Author: Joe Skvarenina
Author: Allen Smith
Author: Joanna Wos
Abstract: These 140 course lesson plans for various community college humanities classes offer readings, study questions, and assignments for teaching about Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism and their immigrant practitioners in the history and life of the United States. Edited by Edward E. Curtis IV and Arthur Farnsley II, the lesson plans were composed by Ivy Tech Community College instructors who were NEH scholar participants in the "World Religions in Greater Indianapolis: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project" from 2015 to 2017.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://raac.iupui.edu/teaching-resources/neh-bridging-cultures-projects-2015-17/
Primary URL Description: This is the landing page for the lesson plans written for the "World Religions in Greater Indianapolis: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project."
Secondary URL: http://raac.iupui.edu/professional-development/2015-2017-world-religions-greater-indianapolis-neh-program/
Secondary URL Description: This is the landing page for the "World Religions in Greater Indianapolis: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project."
Audience: Undergraduate


Memory and History of the U.S. in Atlantic and Pacific Contexts
Grant details: ME-50005-12
Title: Memory and History of the U.S. in Atlantic and Pacific Contexts
Author: Shannon Bontrager
Abstract: Created a U.S. Colonial America Honors history class (Freshmen and Sophomores) focused on the Memory and History of the U.S. in Atlantic and Pacific contexts, Fall 2014, Cartersville, GA.
Year: 2014
Audience: Undergraduate


Audience and Perspective: Colonial Famines in India
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Audience and Perspective: Colonial Famines in India
Author: Aiden Kosciesza
Abstract: This module is part of a larger reimagining of my English 101: Composition I course. The objective of this new style is to rewrite ENGL 101 into a course that combines global material with English composition skills, presented in a modular format with content units that can be switched out year to year according to the needs of the instructor, the interests of the students, or College-wide projects for regional study. This approach intends to heighten students’ global consciousness, making them more culturally aware, and instill in them a greater sense of world citizenship. As such, this reimagining is in line with CCP’s Mission Statement
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


ModuleTitle: Colonialism and Tea
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: ModuleTitle: Colonialism and Tea
Author: Nicholas L. Peterson
Abstract: 1. To examine the production and consumption of beverages as a historical process with significant social ramifications and effects, and to connect student consumption with the history of these beverages. 2. To defamiliarize everyday material such as common beverages by revealing the social and economic context in which these beverages became popular. In terms of tea specifically, to reveal the origins of tea in the context of the social and economic history of the British Empire and its colonial project.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Unit Title: “Cultural Aesthetics of Revolt and Rebellion”
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Unit Title: “Cultural Aesthetics of Revolt and Rebellion”
Author: Christine Corrigan
Abstract: As any ESL teacher knows, ESL students comprise numerous nationalities with a variety of cultural backgrounds, including a good number from Asian and African cultures. Subject matter based on Indian and African topics would therefore be of interest to students from these backgrounds as well as to other ESL students who wish to gain more intercultural perspectives. An ESL classroom can be said to be a multi-cultural microcosm of the world and students often have a natural interest in familiarizing themselves with their classmates’ backgrounds and cultures. In addition, a goal for most ESL students is to learn about the country where they are learning English; thus, another component of the module focuses on the United States. Students at this level must improve their skills in writing various kinds of essays, paraphrasing, summarizing, and critical thinking. Students will practice these skills with embedded assignments in the context of rebellions against the British in India, Nigeria, and the U.S.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Module Title: Nationalism and Theater in South Asia
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Module Title: Nationalism and Theater in South Asia
Author: Faculty: Peggy Mecham, Associate Professor of Theater
Abstract: This module will integrate the significant theater and performance forms of South Asia into our student’s understanding of theater history, cultural theory and practice. One of the issues with survey courses is the inevitable generalizing because of time constraints that lead to a superficial presentation of content and analysis. One approach is to include unifying forms and theories to explore multiple historical theater forms and practices. Concepts and constructs of nationalism and its relationship to identity can provide a framework for examining how the stage and scripts support a study and critique of national cultures and identity. All cultures present and represent their history and values in performance. Disruptions of notions of history or cultural and social mores are also often performed, for example, in dada or intercultural performance. An exploration of significant scripts and theatrical periods and styles, reflecting multiple styles of performance in South Asia, will contribute to student’s understanding of the history and culture of particular regions and groups. These studies will also introduce students to conflicts and issues, both historical and current, in South Asia. Additionally, students will increase their understanding of the relationship of theatrical practices and genres historically and in intercultural performance.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Module Title: An Introduction of the South Asian Concept of Arranged Marriages
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Module Title: An Introduction of the South Asian Concept of Arranged Marriages
Author: Name: Prof. Joanna Labov
Abstract: Rationale: The purpose of this module is to discuss the continued custom of arranged marriages in order to introduce South Asian cultural values to advanced ESL writing/ reading students. It is an excellent way to bridge cultures in a course designed to improve ESL students’ writing, reading and critical thinking skills. An arranged marriage is a custom that is not understood by many people across the globe. It is important for students to examine the custom of arranged marriages because it helps them to understand the values, beliefs and practices of people who come from other cultures. It helps them to understand the concept of marriage from a broader perspective and communicate empathetically with people from other cultures. The students will learn how to write reaction papers, conduct a debate, write a persuasive essay, and a critical analysis essay about the topic. They will read chapters about arranged marriages, view recent films, video clips and read a novel. The module will be four weeks in duration.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Nonverbal Communication in Art: Hybridity in the Visual Art of India
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Nonverbal Communication in Art: Hybridity in the Visual Art of India
Author: Elizabeth Catanese
Abstract: Course looks at how culture broadly define, influences, and challenges communication.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Module Title: A Case Study of the Architecture of South Asia as Cultural Bridge
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Module Title: A Case Study of the Architecture of South Asia as Cultural Bridge
Author: Michael Stern
Abstract: Course Description: This course explores the major historical design movements and theoretical concepts of architecture and interiors from pre-historical times through the end of the Renaissance (ca. 1600). Lectures and discussions will explore ways of interpreting built forms, as well as illustrative sculpture and painting, so that specific building projects can be understood in the context of the major issues that are central to each historical period. Interior spaces as well as exterior forms will be investigated in order to illuminate the relationship between the container and the contained. While this course focuses predominantly on western architecture, Islamic, Asian and indigenous American architectural history will be investigated as well. This is a writing intensive course.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Learning About Indian History Through Temples, Art, and the Ramayana
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Learning About Indian History Through Temples, Art, and the Ramayana
Author: Nicholas Molnar
Abstract: Goals of Unit: To give first-year students a broader understanding of cultures across South Asia, using the topic to discuss the study of the discipline of history in general. The importance of other disciplines to the study of history will be discussed. The students will have many opportunities to write about these topics.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Course Modules: Violence, Ethics and the Mahabharata
Grant details: ME-50046-14
Title: Course Modules: Violence, Ethics and the Mahabharata
Author: W.Esposito
Abstract: This course teaches undergraduates how to research and how to incorporate research materials into a sustained argument having the form of an academic essay. To assist students to these ends, I have chosen the topic of violence and its variants: pacifism, non-violent direct action, etc. Students are assessed primarily through two research papers which they draft and complete. The first explores the social and psychological origins of violent behavior. The second asks whether violence (or non-violence) continues to be useful as an agent of social change. I have therefore written two modules pertaining to South Asian materials for this course. The first revisits the idea of non-violence as understood by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. The second looks at the uses and regrets which attend violent action in the Indian epic The Mahabharata. For a more-nuanced and complete look at how the South Asian materials are integrated with texts originating elsewhere, I refer the reader to the “Introduction of Modules for Faculty” section below.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Pitt-CCBC "Bridging Cultures" Course Modules
Grant details: ME-50053-14
Title: Pitt-CCBC "Bridging Cultures" Course Modules
Author: Community College of Beaver County (CCBC) Faculty Members
Abstract: Each course module was developed by a faculty member from the Community College of Beaver County, with guidance from University of Pittsburgh faculty, through the NEH-sponsored "Bridging Cultures" partnership project between CCBC and Pitt. The modules were designed in response to a series of faculty development sessions led by Pitt's Center for Russian and East European Studies. In developing the modules, CCBC faculty made connections between East European history, culture, and contemporary life and the important questions of their respective disciplines. These modules are freely available for faculty from other institutions to view, download, and use as models for internationalizing their own courses or as a way of discovering material that may benefit their students. Some of the modules are accompanied by a personal reflection written by the module designer.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://tinyurl.com/BridgingCulturesCCBC
Primary URL Description: This is the website of the NEH-funded "Bridging Cultures" partnership project between Pitt and CCBC. From the homepage, click the Modules tab to access the course modules.
Audience: Undergraduate


Children of Hangzhou: Connecting with China, DVD-ROM
Grant details: MI-50090-08
Title: Children of Hangzhou: Connecting with China, DVD-ROM
Author: Boston Children's Museum
Abstract: Join 4 teens from Hangzhou, China to gain insight into Chinese life and culture. Through 4 video diaries, viewers will experience a school day, visit the countryside, see the training of an opera student, and share in a birthday celebration. Video diaries are in English and Mandarin, complete with Chinese vocabulary lists and pronunciation guides, making them ideal for language learning and cultural studies. Interactive maps of China and the world offer lessons in geography. Cultural curricula activities make this DVD-ROM an engaging classroom resource.
Year: 2010
Primary URL: http://www.cheng-tsui.com/search/node/children+of+hangzhou
Primary URL Description: Children of Hangzhou - DVD ISBN/SKU: 9780887277634 Join four teens from Hangzhou, China—Doudou, Weicheng, Gangzheng, and Qianyun—and gain insight into Chinese daily life. China is in the news every day, but not in a way that gives Westerners a true sense of the different facets of Chinese people's lives. Through these four video diaries, viewers will experience a school day, visit the countryside, see the training of an opera student, and share...
Audience: K - 12


Walden, A Game – Curriculum Guide
Grant details: MN-234066-16
Title: Walden, A Game – Curriculum Guide
Author: Journeys in Film
Abstract: Five lesson plans for using Walden, a game in classrooms. Can be scaled from K-12 to university level courses. Lesson 1: Playing a Serious Game (Media Literacy) Lesson 2: Henry David Thoreau: A Life in Context (United States History, Environmental Science) Lesson 3: The Hudson River Painters (Visual Arts, Art History) Lesson 4: Modern Writing about Nature (English Language Arts) Lesson 5: A Wild Lens: Learning to Record Nature (Science, Language Arts, Art, Math)
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.waldengame.com/educators
Primary URL Description: Educators page on Walden, a game website.
Secondary URL: https://journeysinfilm.org/download/walden-a-game/
Secondary URL Description: Download page on Journeys in Film website.
Audience: K - 12


Farm and Ranch Life and Oral History in the Classroom
Grant details: MR-50102-11
Title: Farm and Ranch Life and Oral History in the Classroom
Author: Teri Hedgpeth
Author: Martha Karavitis
Author: Erin Rose
Abstract: Fort Caspar Museum hosted a TEacher Workshop series in six classes during the month of April. FCM collaborated with the American History Cowbody Coalition (AHCC) with the Natrona County School District and the Western History Center (WHC) at Casper College. Drawing on inspiration from the exhibit, the workshop focused on strengthening knowledge of local history sources, agricultural and community history, demonstrating the basic principles of oral history as a primary source, strategies for conducting oral histories, and developing lessons that build on content knowledge through oral history. The AHCC arranged for two graduate credits through Adams State College in Colorado or credits with the Professional Training Standards Board in Wyoming. This workshop was open to K-12 teachers.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Chrono Cards American Revolution Curricular Support
Grant details: MT-234029-16
Title: Chrono Cards American Revolution Curricular Support
Author: Game Innovation Lab
Abstract: Curricular support for the Chrono Cards American Revolution games.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://history.gameinnovationlab.com
Primary URL Description: Chrono Cards website
Audience: K - 12


English Broadside Ballads, 1500-1800 and the Making of a Pepys Ballad Edition, English 231
Grant details: PA-52089-06
Title: English Broadside Ballads, 1500-1800 and the Making of a Pepys Ballad Edition, English 231
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Abstract: N/A
Year: 2007
Audience: Graduate


Ballad Culture 1500-1800, English 197
Grant details: PA-52089-06
Title: Ballad Culture 1500-1800, English 197
Author: Patricia Fumerton
Abstract: N/A
Year: 2008
Audience: Undergraduate


Alliance for Response Forum Planning Guide
Grant details: PE-252926-17
Title: Alliance for Response Forum Planning Guide
Author: FAIC
Abstract: A step-by-step guide to planning and operating an initial forum to establish an Alliance for Response network.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.culturalheritage.org/docs/default-source/resources/emergency-resources/alliance-for-response-documents/plan-an-alliance-for-response-forum/updated-forum-planning-handbook-1.pdf?sfvrsn=4
Primary URL Description: PDF
Audience: General Public


Digital Print Preservation Educators’ Materials
Grant details: PE-258388-18
Title: Digital Print Preservation Educators’ Materials
Author: Image Permanence Institute
Abstract: IPI Digital Print Preservation Educators Materials are a set of instructional tools for previous attendees of IPI’s Digital Print Preservation workshops (funded recently by the National Endowment for the Humanities and previously by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation) to review and use to pass on their new knowledge and skills on this important topic to their institutional and local colleagues. Since this content is a summary of those workshops, a basic knowledge of the subject matter from having attended one is mandatory. Included in the set is a PowerPoint presentation and a recommended reading list. The individual subsections (such as inkjet or dye sublimation) can be taught by themselves, in selected groups, in their entirety, or with additional materials provided by the instructor as desired. In addition, this website (dp3project.org) provides significant additional content on this topic as well as illustrations and images that may be of use. The PowerPoint presentation summarizes the key content such as technologies, materials, sensitivities to damage, care strategies, and naming conventions. There are instructor notes under each slide (if used in presentation mode) that provide recommended commentary; however, these can be modified to serve individual instructor needs. The presentation can also be printed out in a handout layout with three slides per page and accompanying ruled lines for attendee note taking. The recommended reading list is for the instructor to become more knowledgeable on the topic, as well as for the attendees to further their study in this area. It is in no way and exhaustive list of available references, but these titles can be used to develop a basic reference library on this topic for institutions as well as act as a guide for further inquiry and research on the topic.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.dp3project.org
Primary URL Description: IPI Digital Print Preservation Educators Materials are a set of instructional tools for previous attendees of IPI’s Digital Print Preservation workshops (funded recently by the National Endowment for the Humanities and previously by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation) to review and use to pass on their new knowledge and skills on this important topic to their institutional and local colleagues. Since this content is a summary of those workshops, a basic knowledge of the subject matter from having attended one is mandatory. Included in the set is a PowerPoint presentation and a recommended reading list. The individual subsections (such as inkjet or dye sublimation) can be taught by themselves, in selected groups, in their entirety, or with additional materials provided by the instructor as desired. In addition, this website (dp3project.org) provides significant additional content on this topic as well as illustrations and images that may be of use.
Secondary URL: http://www.dp3project.org/resources/
Secondary URL Description: The Resources section of IPI’s DP3 Project website contains a variety of important support materials for those charged with caring for these unique materials including a FAQ, our DP3 Project newsletter archive, recommended reading, videos, a glossary, and our new Digital Print Preservation Educators Materials (graciously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities)
Audience: Other


Digital POWRR Workshop Curriculum Slides
Grant details: PE-50129-15
Title: Digital POWRR Workshop Curriculum Slides
Author: Lynne Thomas
Author: Jaime Schumacher
Author: Drew VandeCreek
Author: Stacey Erdman
Abstract: 115 slides containing Digital POWRR project workshop curricular materials.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://digitalpowrr.niu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/POWRRWorkshopSlides_Master.pdf
Primary URL Description: This is a web page making project workshop curricular slide materials available to all parties at no charge.
Audience: Graduate


Only in New Jersey! New Jersey's History in Newspapers
Grant details: PJ-250083-16
Title: Only in New Jersey! New Jersey's History in Newspapers
Author: Caryn Radick
Abstract: : Politics. Wars. Crimes. Scandals. Shark Attacks. Celebrations. New Jersey had it all. Before the advent of radio, television, and the Internet, newspapers were vital for the sharing and dissemination of information. New Jersey had hundreds of local newspapers, each providing a unique snapshot of the community it was published in. These resources are still widely used by historians and genealogists and provide important insight into the daily life of another time. In 2016, New Jersey joined the National Endowment for the Humanities’ National Digital Newspaper Program, an effort to digitize historical New Jersey newspapers from microfilm. These newspapers are now available online at the Library of Congress’s Chronicling America website (https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/) and are being added to. This seminar will look at the efforts of this project and consider how New Jersey’s history was portrayed in the mid-to-late 19th and early 20th centuries, including news stories, society news, advertisements, and illustrations and photographs.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers
Grant details: PJ-50035-08
Title: Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers
Author: Joan Hori
Author: Dore Minatodani
Abstract: Describes Chronicling America, Hawaii newspapers available, explains search techniques and provides topic guides and technical information
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://guides.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/content.php?pid=124921&sid=1073115
Primary URL Description: University of Hawai'i at Manoa LibGuide for Chronicling America
Audience: Undergraduate


The German-American Experience During World War I
Grant details: PJ-50039-08
Title: The German-American Experience During World War I
Author: Ohio History Connection
Abstract: Education materials created to engage students with digitized German-American newspapers. Students will learn how to research using Chronicling America, how to translate and analyze foreign-language texts, and gain a deeper understanding of the German-American experience in Ohio during World War I (WWI). Each lesson contains educator outline, student worksheets and answer key, if applicable. (Lesson 1: The Growth of Anti-German Sentiment During World War I in the United States; Lesson 2: Assault on German Language; Lesson 3: Anti-German Hysteria; Lesson 4: Researching WWI and the Attack on German-American Culture; Lesson 5: German-American Letters to the Editor During WWI)
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://ndnpohio.ohiohistory.org/outreach
Audience: K - 12


External and Internal Perceptions of United States Immigrants
Grant details: PJ-50039-08
Title: External and Internal Perceptions of United States Immigrants
Author: Ohio History Connection
Abstract: Education materials created to engage students with digitized Polish-American newspapers. Students will learn how to search the Chronicling America website to find evidence of the past, detect bias in newspaper articles, and place current immigration issues in a historical context. Each lesson contains educator outline, student worksheets and answer key, if applicable. (Lesson 1: Polish-Americans React to President William McKinley’s Assassination; Lesson 2: United States Immigrants Respond to Significant Late 19th-Early 20th Century Events)
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://ndnpohio.ohiohistory.org/outreach
Audience: K - 12


The 1920s Ku Klux Klan from an Immigrant Perspective
Grant details: PJ-50039-08
Title: The 1920s Ku Klux Klan from an Immigrant Perspective
Author: Ohio History Connection
Abstract: Education materials created to engage students with digitized foreign language newspapers. Students will learn how to search the Chronicling America website to find evidence of the past, detect bias in newspaper articles, and analyze the activities of the 1920s Ku Klux Klan in a historical context and from an immigrant perspective. Each lesson contains educator outline, student worksheets and answer key, if applicable. (Lesson 1: Background on the Ku Klux Klan; Lesson 2: The 1920s Ku Klux Klan and Ohio Immigrant Reaction; Lesson 3: Newspaper Editorial for Immigrant Newspaper)
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://ndnpohio.ohiohistory.org/outreach
Audience: K - 12


To Strike or Not to Strike: A Worker's Choice During World War II
Grant details: PJ-50039-08
Title: To Strike or Not to Strike: A Worker's Choice During World War II
Author: Hannah Brevoort
Author: Jen Cabiya
Abstract: You can learn a lot about a time period from newspapers published at that time – anxieties, sources of entertainment, local and national events and more. A variety of publishers produced newspapers, each with their own point of view. This activity focuses on articles from newspapers published by labor unions during World War II in the 1940s. Learning objectives include: (1) students will learn to analyze newspaper articles to understand the past, evaluate different perspectives and make decisions; and (2) students will work together with their peers to make decisions.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://ndnpohio.ohiohistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ClassroomActivity_Strike.pdf
Primary URL Description: Classroom Activity: To Strike or Not to Strike: A Worker's Choice During World War II (PDF)
Audience: K - 12


And Now, the News! Exhibiting Inclusion at the 1939 World's Fair
Grant details: PJ-50039-08
Title: And Now, the News! Exhibiting Inclusion at the 1939 World's Fair
Author: Jen Cabiya
Author: Samantha Rubino
Author: Ryan Rindler
Abstract: Newspapers are often a key part of historical research. In the mid-1800s, World’s Fairs (also known as World Expositions) were a way for nations around the world to communicate their recent advancements. Newspapers captured who was there, what was displayed, and how it was received by the world. In this activity, students will examine newspaper clippings from the Dayton Forum, an African-American newspaper, to explore the first African-American exhibit held at a World’s Fair in the United States. They will consider what role they had in creating the exhibit, what their intentions were, and what their participation at the World’s Fair can tell us about American race relations on the eve of World War II. This lesson plan may also serve as a jumping off point for National History Day and the 2021 contest theme of Communication in History: The Key to Understanding.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://ndnpohio.ohiohistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ClassroomActivity_WorldsFair.pdf
Primary URL Description: Classroom Activity: And Now, the News! Exhibiting Inclusion at the 1939 World's Fair (PDF)
Audience: K - 12


Beyond Obits: Uncovering Past Lives in Montana's Early Newspapers
Grant details: PJ-50040-09
Title: Beyond Obits: Uncovering Past Lives in Montana's Early Newspapers
Author: Christine, Kirkham
Abstract: A handout to accompany a presentation on using Chronicling America to conduct genealogical research.
Year: 2014
Audience: K - 12


Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Introduction to Chronicling America and TNDP
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: Guest lecturer for the Digital Libraries class, MS Information Sciences, University of Tennessee. Talked to students about the data created for TNDP, and gave a demonstration of Chronicling America.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12


Indexing and Retrieval of Non-textual Material in Digitized Newspapers
Grant details: PJ-50061-10
Title: Indexing and Retrieval of Non-textual Material in Digitized Newspapers
Author: Louisa Trott
Abstract: Presentation for the Information Representation and Organization class, MS Information Sciences, University of Tennessee. Discussed the issues relating to indexing and retrieving non-textual material in digitized newspapers.
Year: 2013
Audience: K - 12


Vermont Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Committee Briefing Book, Phase 1 (2010-2012)
Grant details: PJ-50070-10
Title: Vermont Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Committee Briefing Book, Phase 1 (2010-2012)
Author: with contributions from members of the VTDNP Project Management Group
Author: Lorraine Lanius, compiler
Abstract: The purpose of the briefing book is to provide information about the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, to guide Advisory Committee members in the selection of newspapers on microfilm to be digitized, and to offer suggestions for other activities the committee might pursue. It also includes a tutorial on using Basecamp Project Management software, an essential tool for project communication. The intended audience of this work is VTDNP Advisory Committee members. It may also be interesting to a general audience, or to other NDNP state projects. The Briefing Book is modeled on the Minnesota Digital Newspaper Project's Advisory Board Briefing Book, graciously shared with us by Anne Levin of the Minnesota Historical Society.
Year: 2010
Primary URL: http://library.uvm.edu/vtnp/VTDNP-BriefingBookRev20110426.pdf
Primary URL Description: Direct link to the Advisory Committee Briefing Book via the VTDNP web site. Briefing Book last revised, Apr. 26, 2011.
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12


Searching Online Newspapers for K-12 Educators
Grant details: PJ-50070-10
Title: Searching Online Newspapers for K-12 Educators
Author: Tom McMurdo
Abstract: A half-day seminar given by Tom McMurdo on July 26, 2012 as part of an interactive class for the Vermont K-12 teacher professional development program, Turning Points in American History. The presentation examines UVM Libraries resources, walks through a tutorial for searching online newspapers, and poses research questions about the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, with practical applications for using Chronicling America's digitized newspaper content to find some answers. Audience: K-12 teachers and educators.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://library.uvm.edu/vtnp/publicity/July_26_2012_TPAH_class.pdf
Primary URL Description: Presentation slides used for the seminar.
Secondary URL: http://www.turningpointsinamericanhistory.org
Secondary URL Description: The website for Turning Points in American History provides an overview of the program and calendar of activities.
Audience: K - 12


Vermont Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Committee Briefing Book, Phase 2 (2012-2014)
Grant details: PJ-50070-10
Title: Vermont Digital Newspaper Project Advisory Committee Briefing Book, Phase 2 (2012-2014)
Author: Lorraine Lanius
Abstract: Revised and updated for Phase 2, the purpose of the briefing book is to provide information about the Vermont Digital Newspaper Project, to guide Advisory Committee members in the selection of newspapers on microfilm to be digitized, and to offer suggestions for other activities the committee might pursue. In addition to Vermont historical time lines and title lists, it also includes a tutorial on using Basecamp Project Management software, an essential tool for project communication. The intended audience of this work is VTDNP Advisory Committee members. It may also be interesting to a general audience, or to other NDNP state projects. The Phase 1 and Phase 2 Briefing Books are modeled on the Minnesota Digital Newspaper Project's Advisory Board Briefing Book, graciously shared with us by Anne Levin of the Minnesota Historical Society.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://library.uvm.edu/vtnp/VTDNP-BriefingBookRev20121121.pdf
Primary URL Description: Phase 2 VTDNP Advisory Committee Briefing Book, via the project web site.
Audience: K - 12


HIST 353 The Worlds of Franklin
Grant details: PJ-50106-13
Title: HIST 353 The Worlds of Franklin
Author: Douglas McElrath
Abstract: University of Maryland class. In a guest-lecture on March 28, 2019, Doug McElrath used historic newspapers and other sources to illustrate how printed matter informed the communications networks of revolutionary America.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


History of Baltimore Libraries
Grant details: PJ-50106-13
Title: History of Baltimore Libraries
Author: Douglas McElrath
Abstract: Goucher College Class: History of Baltimore Libraries, April 4, 2019. Doug McElrath's guest lecture, "In the Beginning: Baltimore's First Libraries" relied on historic newspapers to chronicle subscription and membership libraries in Baltimore in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


HIST 408W Votes for Women in Maryland
Grant details: PJ-50106-13
Title: HIST 408W Votes for Women in Maryland
Author: Eric Lindquist
Author: Douglas McElrath
Abstract: A key project for HIST 408W was to conduct biographical research on obscure suffragists from Maryland, and historic newspapers were a major resource for the undergraduate students in this class. Douglas McElrath and Eric Lindquist taught research instruction sessions and performed individual reference sessions for students in the class during the semester. The result was biographical essays for potention inclusion in the online subscription resource "Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States." The project is coordinated out of SUNY Binghamton, and the online product is distributed by Alexander Street Press: https://chswg.binghamton.edu/WASM-US/crowdsourcing/online_biographical_dictionary.html
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


HISP 611 Historical Research Methods
Grant details: PJ-50106-13
Title: HISP 611 Historical Research Methods
Author: Douglas McElrath
Abstract: A graduate-level course required of all students in the University of Maryland's Historic Preservation Program in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. Assignments include using historic newspapers in Chronicling America to search for contextual information about people and events associated with historic sites.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


How Connecticut Experienced the Sinking of the Lusitania
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: How Connecticut Experienced the Sinking of the Lusitania
Author: Austin Sullivan
Abstract: A topic guide that links to articles about the Connecticut passengers and Connecticut-made munitions involved in the tragedy.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/03/how-connecticut-experienced-the-sinking-of-the-lusitania/
Primary URL Description: CDNP Website
Audience: Undergraduate


Connecticut Women and World War I
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Connecticut Women and World War I
Author: Allison Noire
Abstract: A topic guide with links to articles illuminating the voluntarism, factory work, nursing, and other contributions of Connecticut women to the World War I mobilization.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/04/connecticut-women-and-world-war-i/
Primary URL Description: CDNP Website
Audience: Undergraduate


Polish Immigrant Lives in Connecticut, 1909-1922
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Polish Immigrant Lives in Connecticut, 1909-1922
Author: Damon Luna
Abstract: A topic guide that links to sample searches that illuminate the lives of Polish immigrants in Connecticut in the Progressive Era.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/05/polish-immigrant-lives-in-connecticut-1909-1922/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


African Americans and Civil Rights in Progressive Era Connecticut
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: African Americans and Civil Rights in Progressive Era Connecticut
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: A topic guide with links to sample searches that illuminate the many efforts to achieve civil rights in Progressive Era Connecticut.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/05/african-americans-and-civil-rights-in-progressive-era-connecticut/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief in World War I-Era Connecticut
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: American Committee for Armenian and Syrian Relief in World War I-Era Connecticut
Author: Amy Fallas-Kerr
Abstract: A topic guide that links to sample coverage of Near East relief work on the part of Connecticut residents during World War I.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/05/american-committee-for-armenian-and-syrian-relief-in-world-war-i-era-connecticut/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


The American Labor Party Movement in Connecticut, 1918-1921
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: The American Labor Party Movement in Connecticut, 1918-1921
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: A topic guide on the subject of the role of Connecticut machinists in the American Labor Party movement of 1918-1921.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/06/the-american-labor-party-movement-in-connecticut-1918-1921/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


African Americans in Progressive-Era CT: The Battle over the Jack Johnson Fight Film
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: African Americans in Progressive-Era CT: The Battle over the Jack Johnson Fight Film
Author: Frank Jonientz
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on the reactions in Connecticut to the censorship of a film of the Jack Johnson-Jim Jeffries boxing match.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.org/high-school-african-americans-in-progressive-era-connecticut-the-battle-over-the-jack-johnson-fight-film/
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


The Immigrant Experience During World War I: Enemy Aliens
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: The Immigrant Experience During World War I: Enemy Aliens
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on the topic on the ways in which the immigrant community experienced the homefront security measures associated with World War I.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.org/high-school-the-immigrant-experience-during-world-war-i-enemy-aliens/
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Roots of Labor Unrest in Progressive Era Connecticut
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Roots of Labor Unrest in Progressive Era Connecticut
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on topic of the pre-World War I labor upsurge in Connecticut and its causes as debated in the press.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.orghigh-school-roots-of-labor-unrest-in-progressive-era-connecticut/
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Industrial Education, North and South: The Connecticut Connection
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Industrial Education, North and South: The Connecticut Connection
Author: Allison Horrocks
Abstract: Study guide: Connecticut newspapers covered the role of the Connecticut-based John F. Slater Fund in Booker T. Washington's educational experiments in the South, but also to the industrial education in the North.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2018/03/industrial-education-north-and-south-the-connecticut-connection/
Primary URL Description: CDNP Website
Audience: Undergraduate


Library War Service, 1917-1920
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Library War Service, 1917-1920
Author: Mary Margaret Mahoney
Abstract: Study guide: Caroline Hewins, librarian at Hartford Public Library and Secretary of the Connecticut Public Library Campaign, served as chairman of the Connecticut Library War Service.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2018/03/library-war-service-1917-1920/
Primary URL Description: CDNP Website
Audience: Undergraduate


Free Speech & Seditious Speech in World War I era Connecticut
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Free Speech & Seditious Speech in World War I era Connecticut
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: A topic guide that links to sample search results on the subject of civil liberties on the World War I Connecticut homefront.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/07/free-speech-seditious-speech-in-world-war-i-era-connecticut/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


Play, Recreation, and Childhood in Progressive Era Connecticut
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Play, Recreation, and Childhood in Progressive Era Connecticut
Author: Allison Horrocks
Abstract: A topic guide that links to sample search results on the subject of children and social reform in Connecticut during the Progressive Era.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/07/play-recreation-and-childhood-in-progressive-era-connecticut/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


Hungarian Immigrant Lives in Connecticut, 1909-1922
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Hungarian Immigrant Lives in Connecticut, 1909-1922
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: A topic guide that links to sample search results on the subject of Hungarian immigrant lives in Connecticut.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://ctdigitalnewspaperproject.org/2016/07/hungarian-immigrant-lives-in-connecticut-1909-1922/
Primary URL Description: Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project website
Audience: Undergraduate


Making Munitions is a Woman's Job
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Making Munitions is a Woman's Job
Author: Edward Dorgan
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on women and World War I created by a teacher out of a workshop in which CDNP showed how Chronicling America content could be used.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.org/high-school-making-munitions-is-a-womans-job-during-world-war-one/
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Black World War I Veterans Demand Civil Rights
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Black World War I Veterans Demand Civil Rights
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on the topic of the fight for an end to discrimination in public accommodations that was led by African American World War I veterans.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.org/high-school-black-world-war-i-veterans-demand-civil-rights
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


Free Speech and Sedicious Speech on the CT World War I Homefront
Grant details: PJ-50116-13
Title: Free Speech and Sedicious Speech on the CT World War I Homefront
Author: Christine M. Gauvreau
Abstract: "Teach It" unit on the contested issue of civil liberties on the World War I homefront.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://teachitct.org/high-school-free-speech-and-seditious-speech-on-the-connecticut-world-war-i-home-front/
Primary URL Description: Teach It CT website, a project of CT Humanities
Audience: K - 12


PBCore for Public Media Organizations
Grant details: PR-253384-17
Title: PBCore for Public Media Organizations
Author: Rebecca Fraimow
Abstract: This workshop is designed for staff at public media organizations who are looking to better track information about their content. The two-day workshop will include an introduction to the PBCore metadata standard; hands-on practice time with tools and utilities to support the creation and storage of PBCore metadata; and demo walk-throughs of WGBH’s PBCore-based databases, as well as collaborative small group time to trade best practices with users from other stations.
Year: 2019
Audience: Other


Teaching PBCore: Resources for A/V Metadata in the Classroom
Grant details: PR-253384-17
Title: Teaching PBCore: Resources for A/V Metadata in the Classroom
Author: Rebecca Fraimow
Abstract: This workshop is designed to support educators teaching metadata at library and archival science programs in developing curriculum materials around PBCore. The two-day workshop will include an introduction to the PBCore metadata standard; an overview of the available tools and utilities that support the use of PBCore at archival organizations; a review of available crosswalks and mappings; and collaborative small group time to workshop lesson plans and syllabi.
Year: 2019
Audience: Other


Cataloging the Moving Image: Data Modeling, FRBR, BIBFRAME, and PBCore
Grant details: PR-253384-17
Title: Cataloging the Moving Image: Data Modeling, FRBR, BIBFRAME, and PBCore
Author: Rebecca Fraimow
Abstract: This highly-interactive workshop will provide participants with real-world strategies to evaluate and implement data models, descriptive standards, controlled vocabularies, and shared data atuhorities, through practical hands-on exercises. Dynamic presentations will illustrate the role and purpose of putting in place a strong data model for bibliographic description, using BIBFRAME and FRBR examples, and the value of implementing standards such as LCSH, LCGFT, and AAT as data authorities. Participants will put these cataloging and metadata concepts directly into practice utilizing tools emerging from the NEH-funded PBCore Development and Training Project.
Year: 2019
Audience: Other


Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for Grades K-3
Grant details: PR-258543-18
Title: Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for Grades K-3
Author: April Kamp-Whittaker
Abstract: These are curricular materials, designed for Grades K-3, designed to teach various skills using the Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database as its foundation. K-3 students explore visual analysis and look at database images to consider what animals they represent. Included are supporting material for teachers and worksheets for students.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://core.tdar.org/collection/69827/education-resources-mimbres-pottery-images-digital-database?selectedResourceTypes=PROJECT&startRecord=0
Primary URL Description: Education Resources - Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database
Audience: K - 12


Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for Grades 4-12
Grant details: PR-258543-18
Title: Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for Grades 4-12
Author: April Kamp-Whittaker
Abstract: These are curricular materials, designed for Grades 4-12, designed to teach various skills using the Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database as its foundation. Students learn about the scientific process. Specifically, they access images to test the hypothesis that the animals depicted on the pottery are food.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://core.tdar.org/collection/69827/education-resources-mimbres-pottery-images-digital-database?selectedResourceTypes=PROJECT&startRecord=0
Primary URL Description: Education Resources - Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database.
Audience: K - 12


Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for College Students
Grant details: PR-258543-18
Title: Mimbres Pottery Education Resources for College Students
Author: April Kamp-Whittaker
Abstract: These are curricular materials, designed for college students, that teach various skills using the Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database as a foundation. Students interact with the database using the search function. They search for data to test ideas proposed in the archaeological literature. One lesson teaches about attribute analysis and coding, a second tests hypotheses about the presence of feasting. Included are material for teachers and student worksheets.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://core.tdar.org/collection/69827/education-resources-mimbres-pottery-images-digital-database?selectedResourceTypes=PROJECT&startRecord=0
Primary URL Description: Education Resources - Mimbres Pottery Images Digital Database
Audience: Undergraduate


Transcribing the John Torrey Papers: Transcription Guidelines
Grant details: PW-234827-16
Title: Transcribing the John Torrey Papers: Transcription Guidelines
Author: Richard Jones
Author: Susan Lynch
Author: Susan Fraser
Author: Stephen Sinon
Author: Lenge Hong
Abstract: This product constitutes the guidelines by which volunteer transcribers for the Digitizing and Transcribing the John Torrey Papers Project will follow. The product outlines how users should transcribe the material step by step, and includes instructions on formatting, solutions for dealing with shorthand and indecipherable words, and making note of issues within the collection as they arise.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://drive.google.com/file/d/1avGjATLLXfDztKXrCPFW4w2hXJ7YibAA/view
Primary URL Description: Main URL for transcribers to access Transcription Guidelines
Secondary URL Description: N/A
Audience: General Public


PEN Teaching Guides
Grant details: PW-253678-17
Title: PEN Teaching Guides
Author: Reid Echols
Author: Adrienne Sockwell
Author: Jennifer Follen
Author: Sarah Gutberlet
Author: Christopher Mendez
Author: Chido Muchemwa
Abstract: The PEN Teaching Guides contain materials for the use of instructors to support teaching on human rights, politics, literature, and cultural history. These materials include manuscripts, drafts, clippings, correspondence, official publications, books, posters, video recordings, and additional items from the PEN Digital Collections and related collections held at the Harry Ransom Center. These guides are designed to allow students to engage not only with evolving conversations surrounding human rights and free speech in the twentieth century, but also with landmark events and broad historical trends, from the rise of fascism in the interwar years, through the intensification of the Cold War, and into the era following the collapse of the Eastern Bloc in the late 1980s and 1990s.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.hrc.utexas.edu/teaching/pen/
Audience: Undergraduate


Fall 2013 Issue of American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage
Grant details: PW-50551-10
Title: Fall 2013 Issue of American Speech: A Quarterly of Linguistic Usage
Author: Joan Houston Hall
Author: Michael Adams
Author: George H. Goebel
Author: Thomas Purnell
Author: Kelly D. Abrams, Erin E. Leary, and Trini Stickle
Author: Michael B. Montgomery
Author: Mark Johnson
Abstract: The Fall 2013 Issue was entirely dedicated to articles about DARE written by DARE staff, graduate students, and colleagues interested in promoting DARE as an academic resource to linguists, lexicographers, and other interested scholars
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://americanspeech.dukejournals.org/
Primary URL Description: Home page of the academic journal, American Speech
Audience: K - 12


African Americans at Work in Post - WWII Los Angeles
Grant details: PW-51305-13
Title: African Americans at Work in Post - WWII Los Angeles
Author: David Moguel
Abstract: African Americans at Work in Post-WWII Los Angeles: To what extent were African Americans marginal workers needed in times of economic prosperity, and to what extent were they an integral part of the Los Angeles economy, laying the basis for social and political integration? Teachers and students are provided with (a) historical background information on the employment conditions of African Americans in Los Angeles before, during, and after World War II; (b) a set of photographs with useful information on each time period; and (c) resources for further study. A suggested lesson activity encourages students to investigate the employment and working conditions of their own parents, then compare those to that of the individuals portrayed in the photographs.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/african-americans-work-post-wwii-los-angeles
Primary URL Description: Four sets of lessons ask challenging questions and provide teachers and students access to the Center's photographs — digitized with the assistance of a federal grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities — video and audio oral history interviews, maps, and interesting ideas for classroom activities.
Secondary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/african-americans-work-post-wwii-los-angeles
Secondary URL Description: A curriculum set of 4 units, including multiple lessons, that are aligned with the History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools in the 11th grade: United States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century
Audience: K - 12


Race, Housing and the Fight for Civil Rights in Los Angeles
Grant details: PW-51305-13
Title: Race, Housing and the Fight for Civil Rights in Los Angeles
Author: David Moguel
Abstract: The lesson suggests a provocative warm-up for students, and provides historical background information on the living and housing conditions of African Americans in Los Angeles before, during, and after WWII, and on the legal struggles surrounding racially restrictive housing covenants. The lesson features map activities that enable students to locate landmarks such as the neighborhoods and residences of African-American celebrities and persons of influence on historical, aerial, and modern maps.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/race-housing-and-fight-civil-rights-los-angeles
Primary URL Description: The lesson suggests a provocative warm-up for students, and provides historical background information on the living and housing conditions of African Americans in Los Angeles before, during, and after WWII, and on the legal struggles surrounding racially restrictive housing covenants. The lesson features map activities that enable students to locate landmarks such as the neighborhoods and residences of African-American celebrities and persons of influence on historical, aerial, and modern maps.
Secondary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/bradley-digital-history-project
Secondary URL Description: A curriculum set of 4 units, including multiple lessons, that are aligned with the History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools in the 11th grade: United States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century.
Audience: K - 12


The Struggle to Desegregate Los Angeles Schools, 1940-1970
Grant details: PW-51305-13
Title: The Struggle to Desegregate Los Angeles Schools, 1940-1970
Author: David Moguel
Abstract: The lesson suggests a thought-provoking warm-up for students, and provides historical background information on and photographs of African American students and segregated schools before and after World War II. The lesson features map activities enabling students to locate still existing schools in various regions of Los Angeles, using historical, aerial, and modern maps. The lesson also features a look at efforts to desegregate schools in the 1970s and 1980s, oral and written recollections of those efforts, and a collection of compelling quotes on efforts to integrate schools.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/struggle-desegregate-los-angeles-schools-1940-1970
Primary URL Description: The lesson suggests a thought-provoking warm-up for students, and provides historical background information on and photographs of African American students and segregated schools before and after World War II. The lesson features map activities enabling students to locate still existing schools in various regions of Los Angeles, using historical, aerial, and modern maps. The lesson also features a look at efforts to desegregate schools in the 1970s and 1980s, oral and written recollections of those efforts, and a collection of compelling quotes on efforts to integrate schools.
Secondary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/bradley-digital-history-project
Secondary URL Description: A curriculum set of 4 units, including multiple lessons, that are aligned with the History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools in the 11th grade: United States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century.
Audience: K - 12


https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/intentional-civility-mayor-tom-bradley
Grant details: PW-51305-13
Title: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/intentional-civility-mayor-tom-bradley
Author: David Moguel
Abstract: In the Los Angeles of the 1960s and 1970s, more than 50 years ago, it can be argued that poverty, crime, racism, and racial and ethnic strife were even worse than they are today. In that context, how was a single African-American man able to get so many people of all different backgrounds to work together? On the other hand, given that he was a former police officer, why did he experience such a difficult relationship with the Los Angeles Police Department? This lesson recommends a useful introductory exercise in which students are asked to define key terms related to civility, then provides resource information on the availability and authorized documentaries of the work and life of Mayor Tom Bradley, including extensive curricula aligned with the Common Core Standards. The lesson takes a special look at the difficult relationship between an African-American mayor, who was a former police officer, and the Los Angeles Police Department, during the years that led, and the years that followed, massive civil disturbances in the city. Photographs and essays support activities that enable teachers and students to look to the future and imagine a city and a society in which fellow citizens are intentionally civil to each other.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/intentional-civility-mayor-tom-bradley
Primary URL Description: The lesson takes a special look at the difficult relationship between an African-American mayor, who was a former police officer, and the Los Angeles Police Department, during the years that led, and the years that followed, massive civil disturbances in the city. Photographs and essays support activities that enable teachers and students to look to the future and imagine a city and a society in which fellow citizens are intentionally civil to each other.
Secondary URL: https://www.csun.edu/bradley-center/bradley-digital-history-project
Secondary URL Description: A curriculum set of 4 units, including multiple lessons, that are aligned with the History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools in the 11th grade: United States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century.
Audience: K - 12


Workshop on Cavafy
Grant details: RA-228627-15
Title: Workshop on Cavafy
Author: Gregory Jusdanis
Abstract: not available
Year: 2015
Audience: Graduate


Full and Plain Evidence: Science, Tradition, and Religion
Grant details: RA-50004-03
Title: Full and Plain Evidence: Science, Tradition, and Religion
Author: Kathryn A. Edwards
Abstract: AP European History, Thematic Approaches: Curriculum Module
Year: 2010
Audience: K - 12


“The New History of Archives: Early Modern Europe and Beyond.”
Grant details: RA-50079-09
Title: “The New History of Archives: Early Modern Europe and Beyond.”
Author: Randolph Head
Author: Prof. Dr. Markus Friedrich (Hamburg)
Author: Prof. Diego Navarro Bonilla (Madrid)
Author: Mr. Michael Riordan (Oxford)
Author: Prof. Maria de Lurdes Rosa (Lisbon)
Author: Prof. Natalie Rothman (Toronto)
Author: Prof. Megan Williams (Groningen)
Abstract: Organizer and Instructor: 41st International Wolfenbüttel Summer Course (Sponsored by the MWW Consortium: Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel; Literaturarchiv Marbach; Göethe-Archiv Weimar), “The New History of Archives: Early Modern Europe and Beyond.” Course offered to 17 advanced PhD students from Argentina, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States.
Year: 2017
Audience: Graduate


Art and/as Direct Action seminar
Grant details: RA-50143-14
Title: Art and/as Direct Action seminar
Author: Nadja Millner-Larsen
Abstract: The relationship between art and political action is a topic of heated debate. Likewise, the question of the use of art—or its supposed uselessness—is a matter of continued controversy. In this graduate-level course, we ask how art might be said to act directly upon the world. How have critical art practices tested the categorically self-contained boundaries of art by asking challenging questions about art's purpose in the world, its separation from everyday life, its anti-instrumentality, or its ability to intervene in the politics of representation? The task of this course is two-fold: to both map some key post-war interventionist art practices and to query the conceptual parameters of what constitutes a "critically engaged" art practice. Throughout this course, we will examine a series of aesthetic strategies that have placed art at the center of political interventionism.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://as.nyu.edu/departments/xe/curriculum/courses-spring-2020/art-and-as-action.html
Primary URL Description: This URL leads directly to the course listing in the NYU online catalogue.
Audience: Graduate


Theories of Truth
Grant details: RQ-255700-17
Title: Theories of Truth
Author: Saul Kripke
Abstract: The topic of this seminar is truth in the sense formulated by Tarski, that is, as a semantic notion (if one doesn’t like the idea of truth being a semantic notion, one could think of it as the notion of ‘expressing a truth’). As is well known, there are problems, generated by various paradoxes, the most famous being the Liar. We will discuss, among other things, Tarski’s original approach and how it might be extended. The relevance of Gödel’s work, and alternative ways of looking at the (first) Gödel incompleteness theorem. And, of course, my own work in this area, which in addition to a treatment of truth, mentions some other ways of looking at the Gödel incompleteness theorem. I also hope to discuss the relevance of various fixed points and alternative valuation schemes. In addition, the view, advocated by Yablo and others, that Truth Tellers ought to be definitely false, not indeterminate, and how this might be developed in my own approach. If time permits, we may discuss later developments, alternatives or extensions of my own work (such as the revision theory of truth, Hartry Field’s approach, our own Graham Priest’s dialetheist treatment, etc.)
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Philosophy/Courses/Spring-2018#kripke
Audience: Graduate


Truth and the Liar Paradox
Grant details: RQ-255700-17
Title: Truth and the Liar Paradox
Author: Hartry Field, Saul Kripke, and Graham Priest
Abstract: Between the 1930s and the 1970s there was a general consensus amongst logicians that the best solution to the Liar and related paradoxes was Tarskian: no language can be allowed to contain its own truth predicate. In the 1970s this consensus disappeared, and it is now more generally held that an appropriate solution should accommodate a language with its own truth predicate. How that should be done is, of course, another matter. In this course, we will be reading and discussing a number of papers that deal with that issue from a variety of different perspectives. Topics to be discussed include (hopefully): classical vs non-classical logic, definitions of truth vs axiomatic theories, fixed point constructions, dialetheism, conditionals and restricted quantification, revenge paradoxes, sub-structural solutions.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://as.nyu.edu/philosophy/philosophy-courses/Graduate-Courses-Fall-2019.html
Audience: Graduate


Elementary Recursion Theory and its Applications to Formal Systems
Grant details: RQ-255700-17
Title: Elementary Recursion Theory and its Applications to Formal Systems
Author: Saul Kripke
Abstract: This class will consist in my own introductory approach to recursion (computability) theory. Some of its basic results, though very easily recognized as true by experts, are not usually given as foundational in textbooks. My approach tries to tie recursion theory to basic ideas in formal logic. Topics to be covered include: the intuitive concept of computability and its formal counterparts, the status of Church’s Thesis, my RE language, the basic ‘generated sets theorem’ and the ‘upwards generated sets theorem’, the enumeration theorem, the road from the inconsistency of the unrestricted comprehension principle to the Gödel – Tarski theorems, the narrow and broad languages of arithmetic, Cantor’s diagonal principle, different versions of Gödel’s Theorem, an enumeration theorem for partial recursive functions, languages with a recursively enumerable but non-recursive set of formulae, the uniform effective form of Gödel’s theorem, the second incompleteness theorem, the self-reference lemma, the Tarski-Mostowski-Robinson theorem, the enumeration operator fixed-point theorem, the first and second recursion theorems, and the jump operator. If time permits, we may be able to cover the arithmetical hierarchy and the jump hierarchy, the ω-rule, hyperarithmetical and ∆_1^1 sets, Borel sets, Π_1^1 sets, normal form theorems, the Baire category theorem, incomparable degrees, and related topics. Requirements: a solid background in first order logic and a degree of mathematical sophistication will be presupposed.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/Philosophy/Courses/Spring-2020#kripke
Audience: Other


Power Points and Handouts
Grant details: RQ-255700-17
Title: Power Points and Handouts
Author: Saul Kripke
Abstract: Power Points or handouts were made for the three relevant seminars, "Theories of Truth" (Spring 2018), "Truth and the Liar Paradox" (Fall 2019), and "Elementary Recursion Theory and its Applications to Formal Systems" (Spring 2020).
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://saulkripkecenter.org
Primary URL Description: Available at the Saul Kripke Center upon request.
Audience: Graduate


History of the Spanish Language (SPAN 6600)
Grant details: RQ-50285-07
Title: History of the Spanish Language (SPAN 6600)
Author: Pablo Pastrana-Pérez
Abstract: A selection of facsimiles of documents pertaining to Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's exploration of South America was added to the course content in order to show the scribal practices of different notaries and scribes. They illustrate the different and personalized scribal techniques of sixteenth century Chancillería shorthand and the use of notarial jargon.
Year: 2008
Audience: Graduate


• Topics in Spanish Culture: Origins and Evolution of the Spanish Language (SPAN 5400)
Grant details: RQ-50285-07
Title: • Topics in Spanish Culture: Origins and Evolution of the Spanish Language (SPAN 5400)
Author: Pablo Pastrana-Pérez
Abstract: A selection of facsimiles of documents pertaining to Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's exploration of South America was added to the course content in order to show the scribal practices of different notaries and scribes. They illustrate the different and personalized scribal techniques of sixteenth century Chancillería shorthand and the use of notarial jargon.
Year: 2010
Audience: Undergraduate


The Commentary genre: From Classic Antiquity to Early Modern Times (SPAN 7100)
Grant details: RQ-50285-07
Title: The Commentary genre: From Classic Antiquity to Early Modern Times (SPAN 7100)
Author: Pablo Pastrana-Pérez and Jerusa Carvajal
Abstract: Using Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's 1555 imprint of his expeditions in both the North American and South American continents, titled "Comentarios," this independent study course follows the history of the commentary as a literary genre from classical antiquity into early modern Spain. Graduate student Jerusa Carvajal produced a term paper on the subject and served as the stepping stone to her pursuing doctoral studies with emphasis on the Spanish literary production of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. She is currently writing a Ph.D. dissertation on early modern Spanish drama of historical material.
Year: 2011
Audience: Graduate


“Ancient Epic and the Renaissance”
Grant details: RQ-50431-10
Title: “Ancient Epic and the Renaissance”
Author: Spence, Sarah
Abstract: Spence devoted a Spring 2012 course to study and analysis of the poems edited and translated in our project. The course was cross-listed in the departments of Classics and Comparative Literature (catalogue numbers CLAS 4220/6220 and CMLT 4070/6070, respectively), and included both undergraduates and graduate students.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12


English 19 Early American Literatures: Writing, Resistance, and Revolution
Grant details: RQ-50470-10
Title: English 19 Early American Literatures: Writing, Resistance, and Revolution
Author: Ivy Schweitzer
Abstract: In 1492, the scholar Antonio de Nebrija published the first grammar of the Spanish language, dedicated to Isabella I, of Castille. When the queen asked why she would want a work like this, Nebrija responded: “Majesty, language is the perfect instrument of empire.” The conquest of the Americas, which would change history forever and precipitate the modern era, is inextricably bound up with language and its various modes of transmission. This course explores a multicultural history of the technologies of “writing,” broadly understood, in North America--Native American, Spanish, French, and English, from 1500 to 1800. We will study three strands of that history: The Pre-columbian world and the oral vs. scribal debate; Conquest and religion, especially Puritanism/Protestantism; European settler colonialism, especially relations with Indigenous peoples and Atlantic slavery. In the second half of the course, we will focus on four figures: Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Samson Occom, and Phillis Wheatley, all of whom used writing in different ways to make “revolutions.” Finally, we will consider the recent turn to digital archives and work with the Occom Circle and other digital sites to explore how digital tools open networks of associations masked by maleness and whiteness.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


The Caroline Chronicles: A Story of Race, Urban Slavery, and Infanticide in the Border South
Grant details: RQ-50813-14
Title: The Caroline Chronicles: A Story of Race, Urban Slavery, and Infanticide in the Border South
Author: Patrick A. Lewis
Author: Matthew C. Hulbert
Author: Anthony P. Curtis
Author: Whitney R. Smith
Abstract: The Caroline Chronicles is a unique, document-driven learning activity. It can be used in an AP U.S. History classroom, undergraduate survey, or topical seminar on race and slavery, gender history, law and civics, the Civil War era, or Southern history. Instructor and student packets include:17 rich primary source documents, 3 contextualizing secondary readings, 3 prompts for writing assignments, with grading guides for instructors, Instructions for an in-class courtroom activity
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://civilwargovernors.org/the-caroline-chronicles/caroline-teach/
Primary URL Description: Caroline Chronicles teaching home page
Audience: Undergraduate


"Where I Now Stand": The Trials of Robert Buffum
Grant details: RQ-50813-14
Title: "Where I Now Stand": The Trials of Robert Buffum
Author: Patrick A. Lewis
Abstract: What did the Civil War do to its veterans? How did they cope with the horrors they suffered and inflicted? What trauma did soldiers bring home to their families after 1865? How relevant are these stories to our present? Robert Buffum makes us confront each of these questions. To help guide thoughtful discussions in classrooms and communities, CWGK has assembled a guided primary source reader that presents the story of a veteran struggling with loss, physical scars, substance abuse, a crumbling domestic life, and lack of support from the government he fought to defend.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://discovery.civilwargovernors.org/exhibits/show/where-i-now-stand/intro
Primary URL Description: Online exhibit accompanying the reader
Audience: Undergraduate


A Pilgrim Discovery.
Grant details: RZ-230461-15
Title: A Pilgrim Discovery.
Author: Scholastic news grade 3
Abstract: A worksheet for students based on the project results.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://sn3.scholastic.com/issues/2017-18/112017/a-pilgrim-discovery.html
Audience: K - 12


A Pilgrim Puzzle.
Grant details: RZ-230461-15
Title: A Pilgrim Puzzle.
Author: Scholastic news grade 4.
Abstract: A worksheet for students based on project results.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://sn4.scholastic.com/issues/2017-18/112017/a-pilgrim-puzzle.html
Audience: K - 12


Materializing Salvation in Late Antique and Medieval Egypt: the Case of the Red and White Monasteries
Grant details: RZ-50431-05
Title: Materializing Salvation in Late Antique and Medieval Egypt: the Case of the Red and White Monasteries
Author: Elizabeth Bolman
Abstract: I taught a graduate class on the White Monastery (and its associated community at the Red Monastery) at Temple University. The class was designed to familiarize the students with the monuments, and also plan an exhibition on them.
Year: 2009
Audience: Graduate


Interpreting Nature: Environmental Thinking and Practice in Europe 1500 to the Present
Grant details: RZ-50577-06
Title: Interpreting Nature: Environmental Thinking and Practice in Europe 1500 to the Present
Author: Robert M. Schwartz
Abstract: A course website with links to materials used to introduce undergraduate students to the use of GIS in historical research.
Year: 2010
Primary URL: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/hist256/
Primary URL Description: website with links
Audience: Undergraduate


Aquinas vs. Buridan on the Soul – Phil 7090 – 2012 Spring
Grant details: RZ-50988-09
Title: Aquinas vs. Buridan on the Soul – Phil 7090 – 2012 Spring
Author: Gyula Klima
Abstract: This course compares and contrasts the respective “philosophies of mind” of the moderate realist Thomas Aquinas (ca. 1225-1274) and the nominalist John Buridan (ca. 1300-1361). Since Buridan knew, understood and respected, but respectfully disagreed with, Aquinas’ doctrine, the discussions focus especially on Buridan’s deviations from and criticisms of Aquinas’ characteristic theses and arguments concerning the Aristotelian doctrine of the soul (such as the unity of substantial forms, the distinction of the powers of the soul, the co-formality of object and subject in intentional reception, the role of intelligible species in concept formation, the provability of the immateriality of the intellect, etc.) to find out exactly where Buridan’s nominalist Aristotelianism parts company with Aquinas’ consistent hylomorphism, why it does so, and whether with good reason. Also discussed is how Buridan’s ideas prepared the ground for many recalcitrant dilemmas of modern philosophies of mind, quite justifiably invalidated by Aquinas’ approach (dualism vs. materialism; freedom vs. determinism; representationalism vs. direct realism; externalism vs. internalism, etc.). The basic texts used are Aquinas’ “Questions on the Soul” and “Commentary on Aristotle’s De Anima”, and the critical text and English translation of books II and III of Buridan’s “Questions on Aristotle’s De Anima”, being prepared by an international team in the framework of an NEH-funded project (for more info, see: http://buridanica.org). While focusing primarily on the philosophical content, the course offers opportunities for students to experience in practice the work involved in the preparation of a critical text and translation.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://faculty.fordham.edu/klima/
Primary URL Description: Faculty web site.
Secondary URL: http://buridanica.org
Secondary URL Description: The Buridanica project web site.
Audience: Graduate


Picturing Alaska - social studies 3rd grade
Grant details: SP-50009-09
Title: Picturing Alaska - social studies 3rd grade
Author: Dr. Patricia H. Partnow
Abstract: This is the student text for a yearlong study of Alaska. It was designed for third grade students and teachers in the Anchorage School District. The unit is grounded in Alaska content and cultural standards an is multi-disciplinary, with social studies concepts, language arts skills, and social and emotional learning activities.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Picturing Alaska Teacher's Guide: social studies 3rd grade
Grant details: SP-50009-09
Title: Picturing Alaska Teacher's Guide: social studies 3rd grade
Author: Dr. Patricia H. Partnow
Abstract: This is the teacher's guide for a yearlong study of Alaska. It was designed for third grade students and teachers in the Anchorage School District. The unit is grounded in Alaska content and cultural standards an is multi-disciplinary, with social studies concepts, language arts skills, and social and emotional learning activities.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Picturing Anchorage - social studies 2nd grade
Grant details: SP-50009-09
Title: Picturing Anchorage - social studies 2nd grade
Author: Dr. Patricia H. Partnow
Author: Clare Gauster
Abstract: This is the student text for a yearlong study of Alaska. It was designed for second grade students and teachers in the Anchorage School District. The unit is grounded in Alaska content and cultural standards an is multi-disciplinary, with social studies concepts, language arts skills, and social and emotional learning activities.
Abstract: 2011
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


Picturing Anchorage Teacher's Guide: social studies 2nd grade
Grant details: SP-50009-09
Title: Picturing Anchorage Teacher's Guide: social studies 2nd grade
Author: Dr. Patricia H. Partnow
Author: Clare Gauster
Abstract: This is the teacher's guide for a yearlong study of Alaska. It was designed for second grade students and teachers in the Anchorage School District. The unit is grounded in Alaska content and cultural standards an is multi-disciplinary, with social studies concepts, language arts skills, and social and emotional learning activities.
Abstract: 2011
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


PBS Learning Media Collection: Korea: The Never-Ending War
Grant details: TR-250079-16
Title: PBS Learning Media Collection: Korea: The Never-Ending War
Author: Greg Timmons
Abstract: Students will explore the ways Korea was divided at the end of World War II and how that division separated families, disrupted lives, and laid the foundation for the Korean War. They will examine President Harry Truman’s decision to send U.S. troops to Korea without a declaration of war. They will investigate the conditions that led to Kim Il Sung's rise to power, and they'll explore the challenges that President Truman faced.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/korea-the-never-ending-war/
Primary URL Description: A collection of media and lesson plans developed to accompany the film, available on the PBS Learning Media site.
Audience: K - 12


"Man vs. the Machine" Backstory Podcast Lesson Set
Grant details: TR-259293-18
Title: "Man vs. the Machine" Backstory Podcast Lesson Set
Author: Backstory staff
Abstract: This lesson set uses the Inquiry Design Model (IDM), a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers’ knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for State Social Studies Standards (2013). Unique to the IDM is the blueprint, a one-page representation of the questions, tasks, and sources that define a curricular inquiry. This lesson asks the compelling question How do people react to rapid technological economic change? and instructs students to write, using specific historical evidence, a response to the following questions: How did American’s respond to the rapid changes of the Market Revolution? What changed and what stayed the same? In addition to the C3 Framework, it uses both AP US Thematic Standards and AP US Content Standards.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12


Publicly Engaged Fellows Program--the Land-Grant Seminar
Grant details: ZA-260708-18
Title: Publicly Engaged Fellows Program--the Land-Grant Seminar
Author: Todd Butler
Abstract: Sixteen weekly workshops designed to train selected graduate students in arts and humanities in skills and mindset needed to conduct equitable and effective public engagement projects.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


Celebrating Our Heritage of Games and Playing
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Games and Playing
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Games and Playing.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/games1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Games and Playing.
Audience: General Public


Celebrating Our Heritage of Wood and Crafting
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Wood and Crafting
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating our Heritage of Wood and Crafting.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/wood1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating our Heritage of Wood and Crafting.
Audience: General Public


Celebrating Our Heritage of Baskets, Rugs, and Weaving
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Baskets, Rugs, and Weaving
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Baskets, Rugs, and Weaving.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/weave1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Baskets, Rugs, and Weaving.
Audience: General Public


Celebrating Our Heritage of Chickens
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Chickens
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Chickens.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/chicken1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Chickens.
Audience: General Public


Celebrating Our Heritage of Rocks and Collecting
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Rocks and Collecting
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Rocks and Collecting.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/rocks1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Rocks and Collecting.
Audience: General Public


Celebrating Our Heritage of Fish and Fishing
Grant details: ZH-252774-17
Title: Celebrating Our Heritage of Fish and Fishing
Author: Annette Lamb
Abstract: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Fish and Fishing.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://iu.box.com/v/fish1a
Primary URL Description: A community dinner booklet Celebrating Our Heritage of Fish and Fishing.
Audience: General Public


PRINTMAKING, PRINTING HISTORY AND HISTORIC BRATTLEBORO
Grant details: ZR-256766-18
Title: PRINTMAKING, PRINTING HISTORY AND HISTORIC BRATTLEBORO
Author: Julie Ferrari
Abstract: In a special offering from River Gallery School and the Brattleboro Words Project, Julia Ferrari, Co-Founder and Operator of Golganooza Letter Foundry and Press, will lead a workshop on Printmaking, Printing History and Historic Brattleboro on Sunday September 29, 2019 from 10 am to 2 pm at the River Gallery School’s Main Street Studio, 36 Main Street, Brattleboro, VT 05301.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://brattleborowords.org/events/
Primary URL Description: Brattleboro Words Project website
Audience: General Public