Grant products: Course or Curricular Material (627)
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Assignments- Defining Creole
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Defining Creole
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Defining the term Creole
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- IRB Human Subject Research Training and Workshops
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Lynn Strong
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Dr. Lovell Agwaramgbo
Abstract: Course materials to provide students and faculty with IRB Human Research Training and Worskhops prior to interviews
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Ethnographies
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Ethnographies
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Materials to write an ethnography of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Workshopsand course materials- Filming techniques
Author: Mark Raymond
Abstract: Training and materials for filming of interviews. 2 sessions with hands-on work.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Assignments- Cultural Traditions
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Lesson plans and materials for documenting cultural traditions of New Orleans Creoles and/or of one's own family
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Defining Creole and Creole terms
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Defining Creole and Creole terms
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Author: Hannah Saltmarsh
Author: Nancy Dixon
Abstract: Material on the definitions of Creole and Creole terms such as "boo" or "beaucoup"
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Autobiography: Culture 2017
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Autobiography: Culture 2017
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This is the second assignment infusing culture into the curriculum for the first-year experience; this one refreshes the student autobiographical assignment adding lessons learned from the introduction to folklore, What is Culture?
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Introducing Folklore PowerPoint
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing Folklore to students, the field of folklore, what folklorists do, what we will do at Dillard University in Documenting and Defining Black Creole Culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Documenting Contemporary Creole Culture
Author: Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: Introducing students to Creole, the process, language, culture
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Folklore, an Intro: What's Culture
Author: Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: This undergraduate curriculum guide introduces students to Folklore through the lens of culture. It includes Faith as a cultural practice. From defining necessary concepts such as tales, fables, to demonstrating Tradition Bearers who create artifacts and cultural practice, this guide gives an overview with contemporary media links of examples.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Grant details: AB-226757-15
Title: Hip Hop as Black Cultural Practice
Author: Jeff Benjamin with Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy
Abstract: After introducing Folklore, this is one of two assignments given in the first-year seminar applying features of the introduction to Folklore, this assignment investigates Hip Hop as Cultural Practice.
Year: 2017
Audience: Undergraduate


Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Grant details: AB-253419-17
Title: Please see Appendix A for course syllabus as well as faculty reports for courses in the Public History program involved in this grant.
Author: Anthony Dixon, Ph.D.,
Author: Jeanette Ford, Ph.D.
Author: A. Preston, Ph.D.
Author: E. Mowatt, Ph.D.
Abstract: Please see Appendix A.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Seminar I Syllabus (Exhibition and Museum Studies)
Grant details: AB-258958-18
Title: Seminar I Syllabus (Exhibition and Museum Studies)
Author: Mr. Charles Williams
Abstract: The Museum Studies Minor has been approved. The title of the course has not been officially changed, but the content has.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Museum Studies Minor Curriculum Proposal
Grant details: AB-258958-18
Title: Museum Studies Minor Curriculum Proposal
Author: Charles Williams
Abstract: This is the proposal to change a course title, add an internship, and optional courses to fulfill the minor.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Grant details: AB-258964-18
Title: Lifting the Veil: Seeing the Built Environment through the Lens of the Humanities
Author: Dr. Carla J. Bell (PI) and Dr. Lisa Bratton (Co PI)
Abstract: (TSACS) in conjunction with the department of History was awarded a grant to develop humanities subject matter and content – architecture, education, history and philosophy – for a first-ever 18-credit-hour interdisciplinary minor in African American studies with a concentration in the Tuskegee Architects and the History of the Built Environment in the South. The minor will explore ways of thinking, researching and writing about the diverse experiences of African-Americans and human culture — such endeavors at an HBCU are often more limited in the curricular sense. The new minor seeks to extend African American history and liberal arts, formally into the architecture curriculum through new humanities offerings – and in so doing, provide a more focused historical perspective for students’ current educational and professional trajectories. The minor will be discipline specific to architecture and seeks to integrate humanities approach into the professional training of architects and builders. Unlike many historical arguments, this minor goes beyond documenting educational inequities and offers an alternative curriculum that will advance diverse issues and inclusiveness in architecture and humanities education. The product of the worksop will be the development of three new architecture course syllabi for classes beginning fall 2018. This minor will serve as a model for other HBCUs with Schools of Architecture and will unveil how to integrate the humanities into other professional disciplines as well as stimulate the revision of existing humanities courses to bridge humanities studies with professional schools.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.tuskegee.edu/Content/Uploads/Tuskegee/files/TSACS/Architecture/AfAmMinorApp-DanielsUpdate-Final-10.12.20.pdf
Primary URL Description: AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY IN ARCHITECTURE MINOR CURRICULUM SHEET
Audience: Undergraduate


History 375: Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past
Grant details: AB-269212-20
Title: History 375: Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past
Author: Edward Holt
Abstract: Upper-division course in Digital Humanities for History Department, Data Analytics Certificate, and Future DH Minor Digital Methods for the Geospatial Analysis of the Past develops a fundamental understanding of geospatial information management and analysis methods. The course will expose students to a variety of exemplary projects, applied methods, and tools for spatial history through which students will be able to define spatial problems and design solutions across a variety of disciplines.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


English 375: Digital Methods for Literary Text Mining
Grant details: AB-269212-20
Title: English 375: Digital Methods for Literary Text Mining
Author: James Clawson
Abstract: Upper-division course in Digital Humanities for English Department, Data Analytics Certificate, and Future DH Minor For newspapers, social media, product reviews, and poetry, text is the medium of meaning. But its unstructured format demands unique strategies for bringing order to chaos: discovering general information, identifying distinctive details, recognizing topics or themes, and evaluating sentiment. In this project-based course, students will use tools and methods of data analysis to ask questions about texts and communicate the answers. Students will learn progressively complex applications of text data mining to understand the information that can be found within sets of documents. With special emphasis on literary texts, the course will also discuss and provide opportunities to study the relevance of text mining to fields like public health, business, science, and security.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Grant details: AB-50120-12
Title: Celebrating Lincoln Heritage: A DVD with Teaching/Viewing Guide
Author: Dr. Philip J. Merrill & Mrs. Betty Merrill; Veronica Carr; Dr. Marilyn D. Button
Abstract: This DVD offers six modules, each covering a different aspect of the global heritage and legacy of Lincoln University of Pennsylvania. It includes interviews with well known Lincoln University alumni, including Carol Black, Hersey Gray and explores current student perspectives on their Lincoln University education. This DVD is of general interest, and designed specifically for classroom use to enhance student awareness of the unique roles that Lincoln alumni have played in important national and international developments, including and especially Civil Rights.
Year: 2015
Audience: General Public


Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Grant details: AC-226779-15
Title: Revised Syllabi of participating workshop BMCC faculty
Author: See participating faculty names in "Accomplishments" section
Abstract: Upon completion of the Faculty Development workshops, faculty participants revised their syllabi to integrate at least three (3) assignments/activities cultivating two (2) or more of the project's designated global competencies into their classes.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://bmcc.libguides.com/global; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503377; http://bmcc.libguides.com/c.php?g=503127
Primary URL Description: fall 2015, summer 2016, and fall 2016 faculty cohort information.
Audience: Undergraduate


Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Grant details: AC-234283-16
Title: Trauma Track within Medical Humanities Minor
Author: Emily Clark (professor and grant cohort member)
Author: Zenon Culverhouse
Abstract: Trauma Studies Minor, a track that stems from the proposed Medical Humanities Minor, housed in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. CHASS faculty is uniquely positioned to understand and lead transformative work in the rapidly growing area of trauma studies. Currently existing programs in trauma studies world-wide focus exclusively on psychological and psychiatric approaches. The multi-disciplinary, intersectional approach to Trauma Studies that has emerged from the grant work at UIW will be unique in that it leverages the scholarship and deep expertise across several disciplines to work together to share knowledge, develop innovative ways to address trauma, and to share these findings with our local community as well as with academic communities within and outside of UIW. In essence, the trauma track of this minor allows students to develop a broad and nuanced understanding of traumatic experience and, more importantly, apply that knowledge in their careers and daily lives. The trauma track also requires that students complete some of their service hours at an organization that aids traumatized populations (such as combat veterans, immigrants, and victims of sexual or domestic violence).
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: The Aesthetics of South Texas Women Artists
Author: Susan Roberson
Abstract: Using literary and theoretical texts this course will explore the characteristics of South Texas Women Writers. Doing so, students will read key literary texts, some critical essays about the borderlands and women's writing. They will write reflection papers on the texts and construct a cultural project that demonstrates their understanding of the culture from which the literature arises.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Chicana/o Literature
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: Chicana/o Literature
Author: Jody Marin
Abstract: This course contextualized the Chicano Movement and explored issues of subjectivity, identity, and agency as they pertain to Chicanidad through the study of Chicana/o literature.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


South Texas Women Artists
Grant details: AC-253204-17
Title: South Texas Women Artists
Author: Stephanie Salazar-Amaro
Abstract: • In her high school Humanities class, Stephanie Salazar-Amaro used poetry from the Entre Malinche y Guadalupe collection, art from Carmen Lomas Garza, and passages from La Frontera/Borderlands by Gloria Anzaldúa. She did some cross curricular work with the Spanish teacher to help the students understand the Spanish language portions of the passage and was able to guide the students through an analysis of the texts/art pieces. The students enjoyed looking at familiar scenes, and those who were unfamiliar with the material asked questions. As a class, they were able to discuss the family traditions in South Texas and how they were portrayed in art. Stephanie intends to use more poetry and passages in her AP Literature class next six weeks
Year: 2018
Audience: K - 12


Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Revised Curriculum for ENGL 1302 course
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: This is a collaborative writing assignment. You will collaborate with an interview participant in building content for your paper. Also keep in mind that your fellow 1301 students and I are your audience. Tell your story in a way that will be interesting to those outside of your story—your readers.Select from one of the following topics. If you have an idea beyond what's listed below, send me a message.?Interview a family member about a specific family recipe or food tradition. Family recipes could be something unique to your family, or your family's background. Or maybe it's a common dish you eat regularly, but it has special associations for you. (These are just examples - you may use any family food story that's interesting to you!)?Interview someone from your community about a food tradition. Do you have a neighbor who takes pride in their BBQ? Have you ever wondered how that Cambodian donut shop owner started their business? Interview them and write about it.?Explore the roots of a family meal. How does it come together? What's its significance for you and your family? Who prepares it? Are there any rituals surrounding it?
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Learning to Write Using Methodologies
Author: Michael Berberich
Abstract: You need to begin by writing an opening paragraph that provides your readers with an overview of what the project is about. [Summer semester 2018 the container was filled with multiple colored peppercorns.] You can be creative here if you want. That means you can imagine and invent a context for the assignment that goes beyond information I have provided; you cannot change or alter the rules of the assignment, however. To begin, you should define any key terms that will be implemented in any your methodologies. After all, readers need to know what it is exactly that you are counting. So, for example, what will count as a red peppercorn? This is what is known as an existential question, i.e., something that addresses the very nature of a thing. All explanations in the assignment must be written in full sentences.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Food History
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: Food History
Author: Larry Blomstedt
Abstract: Selections from various authors discussing historical foodways.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Grant details: AC-253445-17
Title: ENGL 1302 Service Learning Option
Author: David Shane Wallace
Abstract: I am offering students the option of participating in a service learning project, which will substitute for some of the required elements of the course. For fall semester 2019, students can choose to complete two full shifts (these vary in length) with one of the following local food-related projects: Before you select a Service Learning project, click on the links below to learn more about these excellent Galveston community organizations. Galveston’s Own Farmer’s Market Sunday shifts from 8:00-1:00 Galveston College Food For Thought: Food Scholarship Program, Wednesday shifts on 9/18 and 10/23 from 9:30-1:30 GOFM Young Gardeners Program, Select Saturday Shifts at Rosenberg Elementary, Oppe Elementary, L.A. Morgan Elementary, and Crenshaw Elementary TBA Seeding Galveston, Shifts/Workdays TBA
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Minor in Religious Studies
Grant details: AC-253456-17
Title: Minor in Religious Studies
Author: C. Moreman
Abstract: The Religious Studies minor is for students who are curious about the religions of the world, the impact of religious belief on the world at large, and the nature of belief. As an interdisciplinary minor, students can take courses in Philosophy, History, Ethnic Studies, Sociology, and other programs. This minor provides a deeper understanding of other cultures, helps students read and write about complex ideas, develop logical thinking skills, and become people capable of thinking through ethical dilemmas. These are traits that employers need and want. This minor can provide depth to any major program. The courses that students can take in this minor will help them understand the diversity of ideas and human experience that we all need to understand and respond to no matter our professions. For example, many nursing and health care programs require at least one course in Religious Studies to help their graduates better understand the religious beliefs that people hold that impact the health care that they seek or refuse.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://catalog.csueastbay.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=27&poid=11451
Audience: Undergraduate


2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Teaching Guide Framework
Author: Sufian
Abstract: revised the teaching guide framework document in response to feedback from experts in year one and from faculty core and team members at end of year one.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Grant details: AC-258909-18
Title: 2019 Framework for Building a Health Humanities Portrait
Author: Sufian
Abstract: Revised HHP Framework document, responsive to project team, experts, and faculty core feedback.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


Teaching the History of Slavery and Enslaved People
Grant details: AC-258915-18
Title: Teaching the History of Slavery and Enslaved People
Author: Caleb Dagnall, Jonathan Mercantini, Elizabeth Hyde
Abstract: Website with teaching resources, including primary and secondary sources, on slavery and the enslaved in Revolutionary America.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://https://sites.google.com/kean.edu/williamlivingstonsworld/teaching-with-livingston/teaching-the-history-of-slavery-and-enslaved-persons?authuser=0
Primary URL Description: The resources on this page – drawn from the archived letters of William Livingston and his family, John Kean and Susan Livingston Kean Nemciewicz, and Liberty Hall more broadly – allow for the exploration of a range of facets related to the history of the institution of slavery and the experiences of the enslaved in Revolutionary era America. While efforts to reconstruct the history of the enslaved at Liberty Hall are ongoing there is much work to be done before we will fully understand their lives and labor. The sources we do have must be used carefully as they are all from the perspective of white slaveholders. The Livingston family and Liberty Hall from the period of 1772-1790 provides an example of slavery in the north and the impact and limits of revolutionary ideas and rhetoric with regard to the institution of slavery. Recapturing this history is essential to understanding the institution of slavery and its impact, nationally, regionally, and locally. The resources available
Audience: General Public


US History & EN105 Assignments/Syllabus
Grant details: AC-258929-18
Title: US History & EN105 Assignments/Syllabus
Author: Brozyna, Martha & Della Fera, Alexandra
Abstract: USI History Assignment USII History Assignment EN105 Syllabus
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


HUA196 Latin American Art
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUA196 Latin American Art
Author: Liena Vayzman
Abstract: This course introduces students to the visual art traditions of Latin America through lecture, readings, and discussion. Topics include: pre-Hispanic art and architecture, Latina/o art, Spanish/Portuguese colonial-era art, Mexican moderism, and post-colonial art. Students analyze the meaning and techniques of selected artworks in Latin American art history through written assignments and oral presentations.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM107 Music of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUM107 Music of Latin America
Author: William Fulton
Abstract: This course is a survey of the music of Latin America, from Brazilian samba to Dominican bachata and more. Latin American musical developments from the past and present will be studied to show the individual characteristics as well as the common elements within various styles, while considering the global impact of Latin Music genres. This course will expand students' understanding of world cultures and global issues through an interdisciplinary lens.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America
Author: Ryan Mann-Hamilton
Abstract: This course will focus on the different peoples and cultures of Latin America, including Indigenous groups, Afro descendant communities, European emigrants and other communities engaged in the formation of the category of mestizo. The social and cultural organization of each of these groups will be examined, particularly in their relationship to the larger society. The impact of the global economy on Latin American cultures will also be examined.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ENG249 Caribbean Literature
Author: Belkis González
Abstract: This course examines the literary and cultural production of hispanophone, francophone, and anglophone regions of the Caribbean and of the Caribbean diaspora in the U.S. It surveys the variety of Caribbean writing, exploring how its texts represent community, class, race, gender, culture, nation, and ethnicity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will analyze literature alongside visual culture, musical genres, and historical narratives.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUN192 Art and Society
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUN192 Art and Society
Author: Arianne Fernandez
Abstract: Students will create a reaction piece that will highlight an issue of their choosing in a particular neighborhood of NYC. The work must be influenced in some way by the body of work of at least one Latin American artist from the list provided by the instructor.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: ELS250 Latin American Literature in Translation
Author: Ernesto Menéndez-Conde
Abstract: This low stake assignment was developed upon attending to the Seminar Enriching Latin American Studies. This seminar helped me to understand cultural processes in Latin American in a deeper manner. It particularly helped me to be more aware of the connections between the Marvelous Real -as Cuban writer Alejo Carpentier defines the term- and transculturation, as defined by Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz. I am also interested in developing interdisciplinary approaches in my Latin American Fiction in Translation (ELS250) class. With this assignment, I would like to explore the links between Alejo Carpentier’s writing and music, while helping students to appreciate Carpentier’s prose, and the links between Baroque aesthetics, transculturation and the concept of Latin American Marvelous Real.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: HUT220 Theater of Latin America Syllabus
Author: Juan Recondo
Abstract: This course will introduce students to theatre and performance practices throughout the Americas (U.S. Latinx community, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Hispanophone Caribbean). We will examine how the drama reflects the different histories and cultures of Latin America. Furthermore, we will explore an intercultural dialogue between national dramas to identify connections between the different Americas. The course will delve into topics dealing with politics, history, dictatorship and revolution, imperialism and colonialism, identity (gender, sexual, national, and racial/ethnic, among others), borders, mestizaje, and indigenous performances. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the scholarship and drama of Latin America and the artists’ relation to U.S. and European cultural practices.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate


Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Integrative Learning Assignment: Paper Cadavers
Author: Cory Rowe-Feldman
Abstract: Dr. Rowe-Feldman's assignment uses excerpts from Kirsten Weld's Paper Cadavers: The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala to explore history, memory, and justice in Guatemala and the United States. In a multi-part assignment, she asks students to compare excerpts from Paper Cadavers with materials in LaGuardia's archive collection. Ultimately students examine how societies forget and remember political violence.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate


Program Articulation Agreement with Brooklyn College
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Program Articulation Agreement with Brooklyn College
Author: Arthur Lau
Author: Paul Arcario
Author: Alejandro Alonso
Author: Anne Lopes
Abstract: This document is ann articulation agreement of thr Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option at LaGuardia with thr Soanish Department at Brooklyn College.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Curriculum Map for the Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option
Grant details: AC-258966-18
Title: Curriculum Map for the Latin American Studies Liberal Arts Option
Author: Ana Maria Hernandez
Author: Hugo Fernandez
Author: William Fulton
Author: Rebecca Tally
Abstract: This map, to be used by college advisors, serves as an advisement tool to locate the best times when students can take courses in the option.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


ENGL 1B: Argument and Analysis
Grant details: AC-264007-19
Title: ENGL 1B: Argument and Analysis
Author: Richard McNabb
Author: Faith Kirk
Author: Colton Saylor
Author: Sheree Kirby
Author: Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite
Abstract: ENGL 1B is a writing course that focuses on argumentation and analysis. Students will approach argument from an historical perspective. Through the study of literary, rhetorical, and professional texts, you will be introduced to different theories from ancient times to the twenty-first century. You will also learn how to apply this literacy to write persuasively in different rhetorical situations. You will learn to write arguments using the logical, ethical, and emotional strategies of classical Greece, the theological and socio-cultural techniques of the Middle Ages, the courtly and political strategies of the Renaissance, the psychological and gendered techniques of the Enlightenment, the negotiation and collaborative strategies of the twentieth century, and the stylistic and grammatical structures of the twenty-first century.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


ENG335 Community Writing: Great Falls revised syllabus
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ENG335 Community Writing: Great Falls revised syllabus
Author: Dr. Julie O'Connell
Abstract: Course: ENG 335: Community Writing: The Great Falls, 3 c Semester: Fall 2020 Each of us is a member of a variety of communities (neighborhood, workplace, house of worship, team, town, state, country, world, just to name a few). We navigate these communities daily: transitioning between them and often defining ourselves by them. Writing gives all of us an opportunity to extend audience outside of the traditional and sometimes constricting academic context. Community Writing promotes citizenship. In general, the course is theme based depending on the instructor’s preference. Themes might include economic inequality, race, gender, the local food revolution, climate change, human suffering, immigration, homelessness, prisons, etc. Over the course of the semester, students read the perspectives of a variety of thinkers (social scientists, biologists, educational theorists, journalists, citizens, etc.). Texts are posted in the Brightspace shell for the course. The class assumes a workshop format with in-class discussion and regular reading and writing assignments outside of the classroom. Students write papers and keep a weekly journal. For this particular class, students conduct interviews with individuals from  Paterson. They complete a variety of research and writing tasks that may include articles, interviews, profiles, histories, reports, fact sheets, reviews, and web-based writing of use to audiences outside of the University. Some of the writing for the course will be published and distributed to a much larger audience and to different kinds of readers than the student is accustomed to, allowing them to experience how their writing affects the community.  In addition to making a difference in the community, the course aims to make impressive additions to students' résumés and, in many cases, help them obtain internships and other work opportunities for the future.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://N/A
Audience: Undergraduate


ART245 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: ART245 Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson
Author: Prof. Michael Kyklewicz
Abstract: • Course (number & name): ART-246-R Computer Imaging: Prism Paterson • Semester: Fall 2020 This course is dedicated to image construction and manipulation. Students will begin to work with traditional art materials, moving on to experiement and elaborate within the digital realm and finally realizing their completed project in printed form. •
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


Paterson: Texts and Contexts
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: Paterson: Texts and Contexts
Author: Dr. Robert McParland
Abstract: This course of the history and literature of Paterson includes a summary of the fiction, non-fiction, oral, and journalistic materials that constitute a living history of this city.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Travel Writing Syllabus (ENG131)
Grant details: AC-264090-19
Title: Travel Writing Syllabus (ENG131)
Author: Dr. Kristen Abbey
Abstract: Description of course focusing on creative travel writing based on visits to Paterson, NJ.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, course syllabus
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Author: Dr. Déborah Gómez
Abstract: This is the new Spanish 1 curriculum at Florida Memorial University, our HBCU partner. Please see the attached syllabus.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HwvffJ4c5DKTV8ObSoq3HuZQj2bvq3Xx/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: Link to new syllabus
Audience: Undergraduate


Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Grant details: AC-264174-19
Title: Florida Memorial University - New Spanish I Curriculum, sample unit (Unit on food)
Author: Dr. Melissa Baralt
Abstract: This is an example unit that shows the pedagogical tasks that we are creating for the FMU new Spanish language curriculum.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1eUM8ISuCKRUlXNa8skcOGgPsjykpQHj5?usp=sharing
Audience: Undergraduate


Beginning Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish I
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-101. Beginning Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This beginning level language course is an introduction to the Kurdish language and the student will develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing Kurdish. Additionally, the student will acquire cultural appreciation.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: World Languages and Cultures department houses this course.
Audience: Undergraduate


Beginning Kurdish II
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Beginning Kurdish II
Author: Denise Cloonan
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: KURD-102. Beginning Kurdish II. 3 Hours. A continuation and further development of the basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing of Kurdish, and cultural appreciation, introduced in KURD-101: Beginning Kurdish I.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Intermediate Kurdish I
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Intermediate Kurdish I
Author: Ibrahim Bor
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: KURD-201. Intermediate Kurdish I. 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach intermediate-level Kurdish to enable students to function in informal, formal, and academic contexts where Kurdish is spoken or used as a medium of communication and/or research.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Introduction to Kurdish Culture and Society
Author: Mucahit Bilici
Author: Denise Cloonan
Abstract: WLC-200K. Kurdish Culture. 3 Hours. This course introduces students to various aspects of Kurdish society. The course incorporates a number of perspectives: anthropological, sociological and cultural studies. It provides an overview of Kurdish society with special attention given to questions of identity, history, important literary and cultural texts and figures, music and dance, food and folkways. Finally, contemporary challenges faced by various parts of Kurdish society will be explored in relation to statelessness and diaspora.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://catalog.neiu.edu/arts-sciences/world-languages-cultures/#coursestexthttp://
Primary URL Description: This course is housed in the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
Audience: Undergraduate


Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Grant details: AC-264292-19
Title: Kurdish Language Teacher Training Workshop
Author: Ibrahim Demir
Author: Mustafa Durmaz
Abstract: The teacher training workshop will present practices and techniques related to the teaching of foreign and second languages to both children and adults. The workshop will further train teachers who are competent in implementing standards-based Kurdish language instruction in their classrooms. The participants will learn how to integrate culture, content, and language in Kurdish instruction at various proficiency levels and needs. The workshop will also address effective practices and innovative language teaching and will disseminate some of the materials developed for the Summer School of Kurdish Language and Culture conducted at Northeastern Illinois University.
Year: 2019
Audience: Graduate


HUM 305: Art and Power
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 305: Art and Power
Author: C. Martin Caver
Abstract: This course is an introduction to aesthetics, the philosophical study of beauty. Specifically, we will examine beauty’s relationship to the political sphere. We will begin by examining some theories of aesthetic judgment, before turning to look at the relationship between art and politics, the way art is central in both propaganda and protest, and how we make sense of art’s relationship to political power. In particular we look at aesthetic movements such as the Black Arts Movement (BAM), the Chicano movement, and others to evaluate how aesthetic judgment relates to political judgment.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 306: A People's History of Chicago
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 306: A People's History of Chicago
Author: Bethany Harding
Abstract: This course examines the history and culture of Chicago through the experiences of ordinary people of all races and backgrounds who have lived and worked here. How did Chicago go from a minor outpost on the frontier to a major metropolis? What social and cultural conditions inspired Chicago’s great artists, writers, and activists, and how did those individuals drive the events that define the city’s past? What made Chicago into a cradle of progressivism, home to racial and social justice movements that have inspired the nation and the world? These and other questions inform our study of the “City of Big Shoulders.”
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 311: In Search of the Meaning of Life
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 311: In Search of the Meaning of Life
Author: Sarah Syed
Abstract: This course engages with the following fundamental questions: What is the meaning of life (and death)? What is the value of life? How do we define death? What aspects of our humanity are visible in how we confront life’s temporal limitations? Students in this course apply philosophical theories to humanistic exemplars from history, art, and literature. They do this through a variety of student-centered activities, close readings of texts, and in-class debates. In particular they are called to reflect on their own experiences and encounters with birth, life, and death, grappling with the status of both our natality and our mortality.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 308: Mass Incarceration
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 308: Mass Incarceration
Author: Karin Steinbrueck
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary study of mass incarceration in the modern world. Using interpretive analyses of history, literature, philosophy, and other humanistic disciplines, students will examine, explore, and debate the role of the modern nation-state in establishing and maintaining carceral systems. This will include the historical role of state-sponsored police and the experiences of people imprisoned. Students develop an understanding of mass incarceration and state-sponsored policing through case studies from the United States and comparative global contexts. They will engage with a variety of media, including content created by and about incarcerated people. In so doing, students will consider the community impact of these carceral systems. The course uses a variety of student-centered activities, close readings of texts, in-class debates, and reflection.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 309: Grind, Hustle, & Flow: Humanity at Work
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 309: Grind, Hustle, & Flow: Humanity at Work
Author: Martin Caver
Abstract: This course is an examination of the role of work in society and the ethical implications of its organizational patterns. Students will engage with a variety of texts that serve to historically ground the rise of the division of labor, its disparate effects on individuals and communities, and the ethical dilemmas raised in changing patterns of domestic and global economic activity. In doing so, students will develop their own views on work’s relationship to civic life and democracy, evaluating and deliberating on ideas and proposals discussed in class. They will do this while reflecting on work experiences they or community members have had, and they will relate these and other ethnographic narratives discussed to their own professional goals.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 307: Digital Humanities and Narrative Storytelling
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 307: Digital Humanities and Narrative Storytelling
Author: Suzanne Clores
Abstract: This course features a broad examination of the field of digital humanities, its methods, and its relationship to various careers alongside a specific engagement with narrative storytelling and digital civic journalism. In this course, students gain a deeper impression of how digital tools are used in humanistic forms of expression and research, and they have the opportunity to create narrative artifacts and stories that engage with their communities or are identified as relevant to their individual contexts. Through this exploration, creation, and reflection, students will gain exposure to a variety of storytelling techniques that help them hone their oral and written skill sets, while exploring the relevant connections of the digital humanities to potential career paths.
Year: 2022
Audience: Undergraduate


HUM 490: Independent Study in the Humanities
Grant details: AC-269129-20
Title: HUM 490: Independent Study in the Humanities
Author: Martin Caver
Abstract: This course is designed for students participating in the Humanities Minor to complete their research or internship requirement. Students will spend a term further exploring a theme or topic from their humanities courses or a relevant question or topic pertinent to their professional interests. Working independently with the guidance of an instructor, students will engage in humanities-related research while developing career skills within a professional setting, incorporating at least two humanistic fields or exemplars. This will culminate in the production of a summative work presented in a public forum.
Year: 2022
Audience: Undergraduate


East Asia and Global Capitalism
Grant details: AC-269245-20
Title: East Asia and Global Capitalism
Author: Jiang Wu
Abstract: This course explores the Weberian thesis on the relation between culture and capitalist economy by investigating East Asia and its connection with global capitalism. Special attention will be paid to the formation of the dominating East Asian intellectual and religious traditions such as Confucianism and Buddhism and their impact on business ethics and practices in East Asia. Expected Learning Outcome: Students are expected to make enlightened judgments about the depth and scope of East Asian thought and business culture and to situate the current subject in the global context. Through reading translations of primary sources and writing term papers and response papers, students will develop analytical skills to interpret the following issues and topics in this class: 1. The formation of global capitalism and the role of East Asia 2. Life and thought of influential East Asian thinkers 3. Impact of their thoughts on East Asian business culture 4. Cultural and ethical aspects of East Asian economy and business.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Portuguese for Healthcare Professionals
Grant details: AC-269245-20
Title: Portuguese for Healthcare Professionals
Author: Ana Carvalho
Abstract: Portuguese for Healthcare Professionals is a course designed to help professionals develop the skills necessary to communicate efficiently with Portuguese-speaking patients in a culturally competent manner. This course aims at offering a fast-paced, step-by-step course for students with no or very little previous knowledge of Portuguese to develop proficiency to communicate with Portuguese speakers in a healthcare setting. Different Portuguese-speaking cultures will be taught through a variety of activities that will bring awareness to differential personal space, dietary preferences, communication styles, symptom management, activities of daily living, and religious and health practices. Thus, in addition to developing the linguistic skills necessary for communication, students enrolled in this course will enhance awareness about their attitudes, knowledge, commitment, and skills to effectively practice culturally responsive medicine during interactions with Portuguese-speaking patients.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Italian Business
Grant details: AC-269245-20
Title: Italian Business
Author: Letizia Bellocchio
Abstract: Course Description Italian business is an advanced seminar in Italian language and general business culture for 400 level students. It will be structured in weekly modules in which students explore both cultural and practical aspects of the Italian economy within the European Union. For example, they will investigate how traditions and customs affect the country economy as well as they will learn commercial terminology and business practices. Moreover, the seminar will include an Italian film dealing with the world of business. These films aim at familiarize students not only with business situations but also with pivotal moments in Italian economic history such as the economic boom, the Mattei case, and the Parmalat scandal. The seminar will provide an introduction to Italian economy from the 1950 to the present, focusing on key factors in the transition from an agricultural based economy to a leading country in word trade and exports (‘Made in Italy’ brand, vehicles, clothing, furniture, food, wine etc.). The seminar will also aim at the acquisition and reinforcement of the essential, practical content, vocabulary and style to every-day business situations and transactions. Each module will offer a specific business situation in which students in pairs or small groups introduce themselves in a business meeting, make travel arrangements, write their resume and cover letter, prepare for a job interview, create a business plan and launch a new product. Finally, while students will be familiarizing themselves with the language and the practices of Italian business, they will also review advanced grammatical structures in writing and speaking.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate


German for Professional Purposes
Grant details: AC-269245-20
Title: German for Professional Purposes
Author: Barbara Kosta
Abstract: This upper intermediate language course is designed to combine knowledge about language and culture with skills to navigate German professional contexts. The language of instruction and communication is German. During the course of the semester, students will learn to express themselves more effectively in professional settings by expanding their vocabulary and broadening their oral and written proficiency (i.e. phone calls, emails, letters, applications, job interviews, interpersonal situations, product/business and cultural presentations). In particular, this course will introduce students to the tourism/ hospitality industry, a multifaceted field that is essential to local and regional economies. It is designed to teach students about the local hospitality industry and to combine knowledge about language and culture with skills to navigate professional contexts. During the course of the semester students will learn to express themselves more effectively in professional settings by expanding their vocabulary and broadening their oral and written proficiency. Through different types of media (i.e. newspapers, commercials, advertisements) students will gain critical awareness of cultural practices pertaining to professional contexts within the hospitality industry as well as German companies. Students will read, write, research and critically discuss business related topics such as economic issues in Germany, the promotion of local attractions for a German-speaking audience and possible cultural similarities and differences between the German-speaking countries and the U.S. They will create itineraries for tours featuring Tucson and vicinity, practice marketing skills based on our and most importantly, learn about intercultural competence, a skill taught in the humanities, that is essential for the hospitality industry and in the international business arena. Since the Southwest is a main attraction for German and German-speaking tourists according to the PIMA CO
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


Historical Skills Crosswalk and Rubric
Grant details: AC-269265-20
Title: Historical Skills Crosswalk and Rubric
Author: Lane Sobehrad
Author: Mellinee Lesley
Author: Rene Saldana
Author: Julie Smit
Author: Elizabeth Stewart
Abstract: Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this project, the project team developed a historical skills crosswalk for project stakeholders that aligns national standards, state standards, and professional standards across relevant fields. The project team stratified these skills into three general categories: (1) Reading Skills; (2) Thinking Skills; and (3) Writing Skills. These skills were then adapted into an overall rubric to assist teachers participating in establishing practical student learning outcomes and proficiency standards.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ek0cVrgydB-3NBZqjfq5HlYc_Qf44N3-JskhR7fcfBg/edit?usp=sharing
Audience: K - 12


Table of Lab Day Topics
Grant details: AC-269265-20
Title: Table of Lab Day Topics
Author: Mellinee Lesley
Abstract: This table captures the curricular design of the lab days leading up to the NHD projects
Year: 2022
Audience: K - 12


Miami Studies: Unpacking & Curating Stories from the Past
Grant details: AC-277755-21
Title: Miami Studies: Unpacking & Curating Stories from the Past
Author: Julio Capó Jr. and Rebecca Friedman
Abstract: This interdisciplinary honors seminar focuses on what we call “Miami Studies,” a field of inquiry and urban studies that centers Miami and its many surrounding communities, cultures, and histories. Miami is one of the most important cities in the United States and the Americas. Yet its history, culture, politics, and overall meaning are still largely caricatured through myth, stigma, and hyperbole, all of which are deeply rooted in the region’s layered past and relationship to colonial processes and empire. Although the region and the millions of people who reside in and traverse it every year remain woefully understudied and misunderstood, community and grassroots efforts have long created, fostered, and studied local knowledges that serve as a corrective to this broader national narrative that has marginalized and underscored Miami as a site of significant cultural and intellectual inquiry and impact. This course will ask you to dig deeper into Miami’s past by not only unpacking its difficult and untold histories, but also by inviting you to learn through immersive experiences, particularly through visits to museums, historic sites, archives, and cultural institutions. Visits tentatively include the Historic Hampton House, the Black Archives, HistoryMiami Museum, and the Museum of Graffiti. We will also benefit from lectures and workshops with practitioners and curators.
Year: 2021
Audience: Undergraduate


The Water and Culture Reader
Grant details: AC-50067-09
Title: The Water and Culture Reader
Author: Department of English, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio
Abstract: This anthology is being used as a required text book in English Composition I and II and World Literature Studies. It contains articles that are divided into the following chapters: Sacred Water, Global Water, Water in San Antonio and the Southwest, Water in Asia, Water in Africa, Water in Literature: Poetry, and Water in Literature; Prose. Thus, it reflects the thematic and geographical scope of the lecture series over the past three years. The proceeds from this book are directed to a restricted fund and will allow us to sustain the lecture series and related activities the grant afforded us well into the future.
Year: 2011
Audience: K - 12


GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: GWS315: Gender, Sexuality and Islam in the US
Author: Nayereh Tohidi
Abstract: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: This interdisciplinary course examines the gender dimension of social contours of Islamic communities in North America with an emphasis on the United States. After a brief review of the geopolitics and historical background, immigration trends, and acculturation process of communities, the course will explore what it means to be a Muslim person in the United States today. Special attention will be paid to social activism and feminist discourse among the diaspora Muslims and their cross-pollination or transnational impacts on the processes of globalization, reformation, and democratization in the Muslim-majority countries
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/ws
Audience: Undergraduate


JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JS496: Israel's History and Peoples
Author: Jody Myers
Abstract: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A history of the modern State of Israel, from the emergence of modern Jewish nationalism to the present time. The conflicts between Jews, Palestinians, and imperial and regional powers will be examined, as well as the relations between the diverse peoples that constitute Israel’s multicultural, multireligious, and multinational society
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Graduate


PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: PERS202: Intermediate Persian II
Author: Homa Esfarjani
Abstract: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: Intermediate course designed to strengthen existing communicative skills and cultural knowledge developed in PERSIAN 201. Emphasis on oral expression, vocabulary expansion, spelling, grammar, composition and, more specifically, reading and writing and culture. Conducted in Persian.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/mcll/
Audience: Undergraduate


RS346: Sufism
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: RS346: Sufism
Author: Mustafa Ruzgar
Abstract: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: A historical and critical study of emergence and development of the mystical tradition of Islam, Sufism, with particular attention to literary and artistic works that are informed by Sufism as well as the relevance of Sufism to the modern world.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/religious.studies/
Audience: Undergraduate


JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: JOUR495MAM. Muslims and the Media
Author: Melissa Wall
Abstract: In this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Year: 2011
Primary URL: http://www.csun.edu/meis
Primary URL Description: n this course we will create multimedia news content, which can include audio, video, photographs, text and social media content about Muslims. In creating this content, students will learn how Muslims and Islam have been traditionally covered in the news media and what the challenges with this coverage have been. The goal is to overcome the common stereotypes and problems with such coverage while learning online journalism skills.
Secondary URL: http://www.csun.edu/journalism/index.html
Audience: Graduate


ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
Author: Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and on the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, etc.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Grant details: AC-50089-11
Title: ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic
Author: Dr. Ahmed Bouguarche
Abstract: This course is an introduction to the Arabic language. The focus will be on the Arabic alphabet and the linguistic skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and culture. Basic conversational skills will deal with everyday life and concrete topics such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, exchange of common courtesies, places of origin, weather, etc. This section is mostly lab work.
Year: 2012
Primary URL Description: NA
Secondary URL Description: NA
Audience: K - 12


New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Grant details: AC-50146-12
Title: New and Revised Undergraduate, Masters, and Doctoral Courses at Mount St. Mary's College
Author: Dr. Montserrat Reguant
Author: Dr. Julie Feldman-Abe
Author: Dr. Jane Crawford
Author: Dr. Paul Green
Author: Dr. Michelle Fine
Author: Dr. Alan Lee
Author: Dr. David Leese
Author: Patty Melnick
Abstract: As a result of the activities carried out during this grant period (AC-50146-12), and pursuant to the grant outcomes, Mount St. Mary's College faculty members revised and created a total of 15 new courses with the goal of internationalizing the curricula of said courses. Courses created and revised were: BUS 183, CS 117, CS 120, CS 280, EDU 199/299, ENG 126, HUM 264, HUM 269H, HUM 271, CS, NUR 160, NUR 161, PHIL 15, PHIL 21, PHIL 152, PT 476.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.msmc.la.edu/academics/neh-grant-experience/grant-outcomes.asp
Primary URL Description: This URL links to a site that houses the syllabi for the new and modified courses.
Audience: Graduate


The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Mind, Conciousness, and Computers
Author: Dr. Anderson Brown
Author: Dr. J. Fernando Vega
Author: Dr. Ana Nieves
Abstract: A team taught course titled "Mind, Consciousness, and Computers" is a General Education Course that explores the philosophical, psychological, and technological interdisciplinary aspects and uses of Artificial Intelligence.
Year: 2012
Audience: K - 12
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Detailed Course Description
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana L. Collins
Abstract: Appropriate Technology: Detailed description for second offering of course Following the appropriate technology tradition and philosophy of technology as theoretical frameworks, this course examines practices of technology innovation and engineering design, and conceptions of human progress. The student develops skills in scientific reasoning and philosophy to be able to critique contemporary technological culture and compare alternative technological options that are oriented to achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally. A partir de la tradición en tecnología apropiada y la filosofía de la tecnología como marcos teóricos, este curso examina prácticas de innovación en tecnología y de diseño ingenieril, y conceptos de progreso humano. El estudiante desarrolla habilidades en razonamiento científico y en filosofía para poder hacer un análisis crítico de la cultura tecnológica contemporánea y poder comparar opciones tecnológicas alternas que están orientadas a lograr sustentabilidad y a promover el bienestar humano en las comunidades y globalmente.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: Appropriate and Alternative Technologies: Revised Syllabus
Author: Christopher Papadopolous
Author: Hector Huyke
Author: Marcel Castro
Author: Dana Collins
Abstract: The second offering of the course Appropriate and Alternative Technologies required a revised syllabus that responded to the student evaluations for the first offering of the course. This revised syllabus included a revised reading list for the students as well as revising the objectives of the course. The fifth objective was revised as follows: 5. Students will be encouraged to develop a shared sense of responsibility for choosing and for collaborating in bringing about the technologies that go with achieving sustainability and fostering human wellbeing in communities and globally.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: ecourses.uprm.edu
Primary URL Description: This is published on the moodle page for the University.
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities I
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture from ancient times (including the Babylonian and Egyptian cultures) through the Renaissance will be examined. This course will address the enduring questions of "What is progress", What defines us as human beings", and "How does technology affect our culture".
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate


The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Grant details: AC-50156-12
Title: The Convergence of Science, Technology, and the Humanities II
Author: Dana L Collins
Abstract: This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the links between the sciences, technology, and the humanities. The impact of technology and science on human culture f