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Products for grant AC-50169-13

AC-50169-13
Somos Indios, We Are Indian: Bridging Indigenous Identities
Winona Wynn, Heritage University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=AC-50169-13

Seminar 1: Our Spirituality Is Sung: Song as a Catalyst for Power and Healing in India and Native America (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Seminar 1: Our Spirituality Is Sung: Song as a Catalyst for Power and Healing in India and Native America
Abstract: The "Somos Indios (We are Indian)" guest lecture series features four academic presenters engaging indigenous identity through a comparative global dialogue. In this first seminar, the Pacific Northwest Columbia Plateau spirituality is the primary focus; however, songs of meditation in the Indian sub-continent are brought into a comparative space as the musical expertise of the speaker engages the audience, exploring what is meant by spiritual reflection and practice.
Author: Chad Hamill
Date: 3/15/2013
Location: Heritage University Donald North Library, Toppenish WA
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9y06zSAOtQ8&feature=youtu.be
Primary URL Description: This first seminar public lecture can be accessed through the YouTube site as well as through the main page of Heritage University (search term--Somos Indios). Additionally, the lecture and related information and resources can be found on the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning (CILT) site at Heritage University (search term-CILT)

Seminar 2: Finding the Right Words: Studying Indigenous 'Gender' Through an Indigenous Method of Enquiry (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Seminar 2: Finding the Right Words: Studying Indigenous 'Gender' Through an Indigenous Method of Enquiry
Abstract: This second lecture in the "Somos Indios" series references the Mayan Calendar as the center of a global paradigm shift through which gender roles are reconsidered and challenged. Gender roles, which are socially and culturally constructed denote personal power, status, attributes and the extent to which contribution is defined and acknowledged within specific communities. Stories from several North American Indian groups are used as examples of gender reassigning or the altering of gender personas to ensure survival or to enhance the community experience. The Pueblo People's story of "Laughing Warrior Girl" who went from grinding corn to engaging the enemy on horseback is one example given.
Author: Kathryn W. Shanley
Date: 4/26/2013
Location: Heritage University Donald North Library, Toppenish WA
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkHdyB9PhBc&feature=youtu.be
Primary URL Description: This second seminar public lecture can be accessed through the YouTube site as well as through the main page of Heritage University (search term--Somos Indios). Additionally, the lecture and related information and resources can be found on the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning (CILT) site at Heritage University (search term-CILT)

Seminar 3:The Portrayal of Indigenous Women in the Mexican Imaginary: From Codexes to Cinema to Cyberspace (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Seminar 3:The Portrayal of Indigenous Women in the Mexican Imaginary: From Codexes to Cinema to Cyberspace
Abstract: Through an analysis of the portrayal of Mexican/indigenous women in three key films, the dichotomy of the Virgin de Guadalupe/La Malinche is brought forth as a two-dimensional construct which features impossible models of "womanhood." Stereotypes of indigenous women are presented as part of a hierarchical structure which includes sophisticated city-types, innocent and unspoiled rural women, and then indigenous women as the lowest category--uneducated,easily duped, and powerless. However it is important to remember that the first film discussed,"Maria Candelaria," does create a new subjectivity in Mexican film: the appearance of the indigenous woman, who although stereo typically represented, is at least visible.
Author: Nohemy Solorzano-Thompson
Date: 10/24/2013
Location: Heritage University Donald North Library, Toppenish WA
Primary URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6xwDz9Dqzk&feature=youtu.be
Primary URL Description: This third seminar public lecture can be accessed through the YouTube site as well as through the main page of Heritage University (search term--Somos Indios). Additionally, the lecture and related information and resources can be found on the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning (CILT) site at Heritage University (search term-CILT)

Seminar 4: Connecting Communities and Bridging Cultures: Digital Heritage and the Ethics of Sharing Indigenous Knowledge (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Seminar 4: Connecting Communities and Bridging Cultures: Digital Heritage and the Ethics of Sharing Indigenous Knowledge
Abstract: Working with communities and their respective cultural collections housed in libraries, museums, and archives in local, regional, national and global locations is an ethical commitment. Converting materials for online access moves beyond the common term of "digitization." Digital repatriation is political, social, cultural and very complex as issues of loss due to colonization and reassignment of artifacts for national preservation are considered and challenged.
Author: Kim Christen
Date: 11/08/2013
Location: Heritage University Donald North Library, Toppenish WA
Primary URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqHCL1C9PV8&list=UUBulrFmhxeGw12vhUepY16g
Primary URL Description: This fourth seminar public lecture can be accessed through the YouTube site as well as through the main page of Heritage University (search term--Somos Indios). Additionally, the lecture and related information and resources can be found on the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning (CILT) site at Heritage University (search term-CILT)

National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NAACS) 2012 Fall Regional Conference (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies (NAACS) 2012 Fall Regional Conference
Author: Winona Wynn
Author: Jose Moreno
Abstract: Coordinated and hosted, to enhance our "Somos Indios" grant, the National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies 2012 Fall Regional Conference. Heritage University faculty associated with our NEH grant were able to present their work related to our four NEH "Somos Indios" syllabus themes created for our Native American and Indigenous Studies Academic Program.
Date Range: 10/19/2012-10/20/2012
Location: Heritage University Smith Family Hall, Toppenish, WA
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/AboutHeritage/NAACS2012Conference.aspx
Primary URL Description: Full program and conference presentations listed on this Heritage University site. Friday Program opening statements by Dr. Winona Wynn credited NEH and presented our funded grant program, 'Somos Indios" as a catalyst for hosting the NAACS Conference.

American Cultural Dance (Blog Post)
Title: American Cultural Dance
Author: Dr. Apanakhi Buckley
Abstract: In our NEH syllabus work-session when describing a participant's response to one of his studies, the quote Chad shared was notable, “When we were singing the songs you felt harmony—connecting with the harmony within yourself.” That’s what I felt working with Chad on the Indigenous Studies project—harmony within myself. Chad has agreed to co-teach the American Cultural Dance course with me, and I think we can look forward to an inspiring course.
Date: 5/16/2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/FacultyStaff/CILTResourcesforFaculty/SomosIndiosWeareIndian/SomosIndiosBlog/tabid/1195/EntryId/31/American-Cultural-Dance.aspx
Primary URL Description: This blog entry is posted on the Center for Inter-cultural Teaching and Learning site at Heritage University, and is most easily accessed through the link provided, but also can be found by searching the Heritage University main page (CILT).
Blog Title: American Cultural Dance (Teaching an NEH Developed Course with invited scholar, Chad Hamill)

Thoughts on Cultural Images and Objectives (Blog Post)
Title: Thoughts on Cultural Images and Objectives
Author: Janet Castilleja
Abstract: Kim Christen’s talk on the use of images of cultural objects and activities made me think about cultural images and objects that I have been around as a member of the Samish Indian Nation.
Date: 11/27/2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/FacultyStaff/CILTResourcesforFaculty/CILTBlog/tabid/1039/tagid/16/Indios.aspx
Primary URL Description: This blog entry is posted on the Center for Inter-cultural Teaching and Learning site at Heritage University, and is most easily accessed through the link provided, but also can be found by searching the Heritage University main page (CILT).
Blog Title: Thoughts on Cultural Images and Objectives

Reflections on Indigenous Womanhood: Beyond the Body Politic (Blog Post)
Title: Reflections on Indigenous Womanhood: Beyond the Body Politic
Author: Winona Wynn
Abstract: As we ponder, negotiate, and question the words of our visiting scholars for this National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) curriculum development project, we are challenged to discover and rethink hidden dimensions of our own identities, as well as those that have been defined for us through culture, governmental policy, religion, and what Iranian scholar Hamedraza Kohzadi terms, “overtly individualized western culture.” Kate Shanley, in her talk titled, “Finding the Right Words: Studying Indigenous ‘Gender’ Through an Indigenous Method of Inquiry” tells a traditional Crow Indian story of Ihkawaleische (Hand Star) and by so doing, she identifies “storytelling” as an indigenous method of inquiry.
Date: 6/24/2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/FacultyStaff/CILTResourcesforFaculty/SomosIndiosWeareIndian/SomosIndiosBlog/tabid/1195/EntryId/32/Reflections-on-Indigenous-Womanhood-Beyond-the-Body-Politic.aspx
Primary URL Description: This blog entry is posted on the Center for Inter-cultural Teaching and Learning site at Heritage University, and is most easily accessed through the link provided, but also can be found by searching the Heritage University main page (CILT).
Blog Title: Reflections on Indigenous Womanhood: Beyond the Body Politic

Integrating Indigenous Identities (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Integrating Indigenous Identities
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Ann Olson
Abstract: This course, INDIG 4XX, functions as a culminating thematic course that complements, complicates and deepens previous courses taken in the NAIS Program. Additional pre-requisites ensure that students are prepared to engage with complex analysis and critical research essay writing formats. Placed in the fourth year, the course is the final “examination” of themes and community/research processes explored throughout the NAIS curriculum. The seminar format of this course limits the number of students to ensure full and deep engagement with the teaching and learning opportunities. True to the format of the FOUR KEY NAIS courses, INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS IDENTITIES (NAIS 4XX) will incorporate and interconnect both intergenerational research and community internships with major course themes. The course will be taught through a collaborative teaching model the goal of which is to enlist our NAIS Advisory Board members* to continue to work with our faculty in a reciprocal teaching and learning context.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Integrating_Indigenous_Identities.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12

Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Analyzing Indigenous Gender Syllabus
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Debra Rice
Abstract: This course explores indigenous women through the lens of gender, which is not defined biologically, but instead is shaped through social roles, political rules, and community expectations. It identifies the ways in which indigenous women’s’ personal and political experiences continue to impact agency and empowerment in both their personal and public lives. Course materials will explore historical and contemporary perspectives through Native American and Latino/a authors and scholars, as well as others, as the professor’s expertise and research allows. The primary focus, however, is on indigenous communities of Native North American/Canadian tribal groups, and Central and South American tribal/community groups.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Analyzing_Indigenous_Gender.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12

Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Indigenous Comparative Music and Dance
Author: Apanakhi Buckley
Abstract: American Cultural Dance emphasizes North American Indian dance traditions--- their performance and history. The course examines how dance is used as expression; how American Indian dance has been oppressed in the course of conquest, and how it has been used to resist oppression.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Dance.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Audience: K - 12

Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Museum Studies Certificate: cultural stewardship, sovereignty, and indigenous intellectual property protection
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Pamela Fabela
Author: Miles Miller
Abstract: Thanks to the former and current Yakama Nation Museum Directors: Pamela Fabela and Miles Miller for their contributions through dialogue and guidance. All courses in the certificate are transferable to the Native American and Indigenous Studies A.A. or B.A. Degree Programs. Because the student will encounter multiple and diverse “writing opportunities” ranging from brief exhibit descriptors to professional memos and letters to group research reports, pre-entry requirements for the program are a 100 level English Composition course and a Technical Writing course. As the outcomes indicate, students will be trained in critical areas of “museum management” honing entry level transferable skills welcome in any museum environment and/or applicable to special projects in cultural center environments.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Museum_Studies.pdf
Primary URL Description: This syllabus is archived in the "Grant Product" section of the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching (CILT) which maintains an online presence; however, through CILT's many manifestations: trainings, resources, archival research, etc., resources are showcased and highlighted at appropriate events on the main Heritage University campus located in Toppenish, WA
Secondary URL: http://plateauportal.wsulibs.wsu.edu/images/help_topic1.png
Secondary URL Description: "The Plateau Peoples' Web Portal is a gateway to Plateau peoples' cultural materials held in Washington State University's Libraries, Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections (MASC), the Museum of Anthropology and national donors including the National Anthropological Archives and the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian Institution. The materials in the portal have been chosen and curated by the tribes. Tribal administrators, working with their tribal governments, have provided information and their own additional materials to the portal as a means of expanding and extending the archival record" (Plateau People's Portal Introduction).
Audience: Undergraduate
Audience: K - 12

Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Tribal Court Advocacy Certificate
Author: Dr. Winona Wynn
Author: Julio Carranza, J.D.
Author: Yakama Nation Chief Judge Ted Strong
Abstract: fjsfjapofapof
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.heritage.edu/Portals/0/pdfs/Faculty_and_Staff/CILT/Tribal_Court_Advocacy.pdf
Audience: K - 12


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