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Products for grant AKB-260507-18

AKB-260507-18
Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students
Daniel Levinson Wilk, Fashion Institute of Technology

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=AKB-260507-18

Addressing Race and Ethnicity in Art and Design Curriculum: How to Introduce Business and Labor History (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Addressing Race and Ethnicity in Art and Design Curriculum: How to Introduce Business and Labor History
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: This session should particularly benefit faculty members and organization leader—i.e. working-class professionals with careers in creative industry—in need of learning how to engage their audiences with issues of race and ethnicity. Any faculty member in their own discipline can learn strategies of addressing race and ethnicity in courses outside social justice or cultural studies. This poster session presents a curricular map with new course initiatives and primary sources for art and design curriculum, as a model, addressing issues of race, ethnicity, transnationality, social justice, and LGBTQ. The project planning took place in the 2015-2017 school years, as FIT Art History professors Dr. Kyunghee Pyun and Dr. Amy Werbel developed and introduced new courses in Asian American and African American art. Now professors of design and business got involved to implement elements of race and ethnicity in historicizing current affairs. In the process of developing and teaching these classes for the first time, professors and students began to discuss the importance of labor history in understanding the careers of many Asian American and African American artists. This example can be modified and replicated in any other fields such as hospitality, human services, medical services, psychology, ecology, and more. [199 words]
Date: 06/26/2020
Primary URL: https://ncore.ou.edu/en/connection-2020/
Primary URL Description: Main webpage of Connection 2020: An NCORE Experience. NCORE is proud to announce that we developed a new online event, Connection 2020: An NCORE Experience, that was held June 23-26, 2020.
Secondary URL: https://ncore.secure-platform.com/a/page/attendee-guide
Secondary URL Description: Connection 2020: An NCORE Experience is NCORE's first virtual conference due to COVID 19.
Conference Name: The 33rd Annual National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education (NCORE 2020)

Teaching Business and Labor History for Art and Design Students (Exhibition)
Title: Teaching Business and Labor History for Art and Design Students
Curator: Kyunghee Pyun
Curator: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: In this poster session, we would like to present a curricular map with new course initiatives and primary sources that we’ve developed during the first year of an NEH-funded project, Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students currently in progress at Fashion Institute of Technology. Our faculty members and students are working-class professionals with careers in creative industry. As historians, we wanted to explain why they have a series of part-time jobs and so many layoffs throughout their previous or current workplace.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2020/webprogram/Session20375.html
Primary URL Description: AHA Poster Session 1's list of participating projects
Secondary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2020/webprogram/Paper27649.html
Secondary URL Description: Our Poster Session's description

Invisible Faces: Business of Visual Art (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Invisible Faces: Business of Visual Art
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: I argue that through the labor studies of economic equality, immigration policies, social activism, and global trade, students and faculty will understand themselves as part of a greater historical context. Long-term, faculty will retain this knowledge and new educational resources to incorporate labor perspectives into all standard courses of art and design. Between 2015 and 2017, 46 small or mid-size galleries, reputable in the field, went out of business in New York while demand for contemporary work has risen five-fold since 2000. Despite growth in the total amount of sales, only 25 artists are responsible for almost half of all postwar and contemporary art auction sales. In 2017, work by this small group of elite artists sold for a combined $1.2 billion—44.6 percent of the $2.7 billion total generated by all contemporary public auction sales worldwide. Teaching the reality of business in contemporary art is not easy. Historical precedents and contemporary practices are traceable in primary sources, but students rarely relate them to their own future. Project-based learning initiatives with in-depth interviews with artists in their studios are designed to address issues such as changing conditions of primary and secondary markets; demise of small or mid-size galleries; rise of public art; growing business expenses; choices made by artists as alternatives to a gallery system; amending a standard gallery contract; transformation of an artist’s careers; monopoly of few giant galleries; demographic changes of collectors; and other crucial perspectives. 360 videos of artist studios scattered around New York City's boroughs were produced to engage students with work conditions of professional artists of our own time. In this presentation, Pyun presents mini projects she developed in order to move forward immersive learning initiatives related to business and labor history.
Date: 01/05/2020
Primary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2020/webprogram/start.html
Primary URL Description: American Historical Association 2020 Annual Meeting, Program Summary
Secondary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2020/webprogram/Paper28035.html
Secondary URL Description: Abstract page of this paper
Conference Name: Tailoring American Business and Labor History for Art and Design Curriculum. Roundtable Session. The 134 Annual Meeting, American Historical Association (AHA) held at Hilton New York, New York City on 5 January 2020 (Co-Organizers: Daniel Levinson Wilk an

Art in New York: Art, Spectacle, and Labor (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Art in New York: Art, Spectacle, and Labor
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: In conjunction with my research project, Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students under progress from 2018 to 2021, I would like all of you to consider the intersection of art, spectacle, and labor as a theme of Art in New York in the spring of 2019. Art and labor became more prominent in the nineteenth century as rural society rapidly transformed into urban culture. Scenes of rural laborers such as farmers, fishermen, or workers were often received as nostalgic views of by-gone eras. Artists such as Impressionists in nineteenth-century Paris discovered images of urban workers such as shop keepers, street vendors, or railroad workers. At the same time, the genre of spectacle was being invented in industrial machines, steel and glass buildings, or newly renovated urban boulevards. In this class, we will visit a diverse range of special exhibitions held in New York City or elsewhere and think about how art (or artists) is intertwined with the creation of spectacles or spectacular new experiences at the expense of hard labor, visible or invisible.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

History of Business in the Visual Arts: 1800-2000 (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: History of Business in the Visual Arts: 1800-2000
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: This course explores the intersection of art and labor from the perspective of how the production of visual arts has evolved with economic development and business management. Students learn about critical issues that surround the making of art and the status of artists and designers in the context of modern and contemporary labor and business. The course enables students to understand that historical events or philosophical ideologies impact the livelihood of artists and designers. Students also learn about effects of political upheaval, war, migration, and exile on works and career choices of artists and designers. Changes to the terms of employment and labor conditions have resulted from incidents including, but not limited to, looms driven by steam; the invention of readymade paint in tubes; contemporary issues of copyright and originality; the mining labor behind the use of precious materials in art; and the exposure to poisons and pollution in the manufacture of certain luxury products. Topics and case studies are open to thematic and theoretical approaches as new modes of employment emerge in the present time. Historical precedents of the collaborative aspects of art, architecture, design, or crafts, as well as interdisciplinary collaborations with creators and practitioners outside visual arts are also introduced within the course’s own framework of art and labor.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate

Historical Avatars and role playing (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Historical Avatars and role playing
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: Reading city directories and census pages at the beginning of a semester, students will take a real person who worked at the occupation they are studying and build a character based on those records and other primary and secondary sources we provide. In class, or off-line, the student will play this character as she or he faces crises and conundrums of the eras. When the record is silent on these specific people (their values, aspects of their identity, the kind of firm they work for, etc.), students will fill in the blanks with their imagination, guided by readings about the era. This will become an avatar or virtual character for the student. Students can be allowed to play their ancestors. Some faculty may want to impose balances of class, race, gender, occupation, etc. Very few students should be allowed to play famous people.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Experiential Learning Projects: Shadowing Professionals (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Experiential Learning Projects: Shadowing Professionals
Author: Vincent Quan
Abstract: By shadowing a professional or interviewing a recent retiree of a specific field of industry, students can develop a sense of community as well as learn about realities of working-class employees in New York City. Instructors can create an assignment pertinent to this and provide a historical context. Many students are already working or participating in internships in their chosen professional training. Historicizing their industry or positions with someone’s life experience and personal stories will enable students to perceive their career path with more dignity and socio-economic contexts.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Show Girls and Cameramen: Entertainment Workers in New York City (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Show Girls and Cameramen: Entertainment Workers in New York City
Author: Ron Amato
Abstract: Area: Entertainment/Marketing Pair: Ron Amato (Photography, FIT) and Michelle Handelman (Film and Media, FIT) Art: Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, David Salle, Kehinde Wiley Film and television clips: Singin’ in the Rain (Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, 1952); The Producers (Mel Brooks, 1967); High Art (Lisa Cholodenko, 1998); The Times of Bill Cunningham (Mark Bozek, 2010) Clips will focus on issues of gender and social class among various professions within the entertainment industry. Workers’ rights and fair contracts will receive much emphasis in the evolution of the entertainment industry post WWII. Ethnic diversity and gender identity will also be addressed, in light of marginalized sectors of industry such as strippers, exotic dancers, transgender performers, and burlesque actors. Photographers, costume designers, cinematographers, or scenic artists are indispensable in the narrative of the entertainment business and teaching business and labor aspects of the industry. FIT professors are film producers, directors and playwrights. They can collaborate with professors at CUNY colleges teaching the entertainment technologies of sound, lighting, scenery, video and show control.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Interethnic Relations in the Workplace (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Interethnic Relations in the Workplace
Author: Vincent Quan
Abstract: Area: Fashion Business Management and Advertising and Marketing Communication Pair: Vincent Quan (FBM) and Rebecca Bauman (Modern Languages and Cultures, FIT) Art: Edward Hopper, Archibald Motley, Adrian Piper Film and television clips: Here students confront narratives of racial justice in the workplace through the comparison of interethnic conflict in both blue collar and white-collar environments, looking specifically at the representations of interactions between African Americans and Italian Americans in the context of labor. We look at fictional representations in cinema such as Matewan (Sayles, 1987), Do The Right Thing (Lee, 1980), and The Green Book (Farrelly, 2018) while contextualizing them in the historical background of immigration, segregation, and integration as they pertain to these two groups. Students will then create theatrical projects in which they imagine different modes of interaction based on racial and ethnic identity in a variety of different workplace contexts.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate

Cultural Expectations of Hospitality (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Cultural Expectations of Hospitality
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: Area: Hospitality and Communication Design Pair: Daniel Levinson Wilk (History, FIT) and Patrice George (Textile Development and Marketing, FIT) Songs: “Pennsylvania 6-5000,” “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Hotel California” Art: service work in Jacob Lawrence and Edward Hopper Film and television clips: Grand Hotel (1932), Week-End at the Waldorf (1945), Home Alone (1990), The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), Maid in Manhattan (2002), Hotel Rwanda (2004), Grand Hotel (2019), student choices Discussion will examine how popular culture has portrayed hotel hospitality over the last hundred years, to what extent students and industry professionals think it shapes consumer desire and demand, and how one would research or measure the effect. Are hotel workers and especially management figures portrayed as servile or confident? How much of the actual workflow is depicted, and if it is not realistic, how might it warp viewers’ experiences in real hotels? After reviewing selections of popular art provided by the professors, students will find their own clips to show and comment on to the class.
Year: 2020
Audience: Undergraduate

Shop Girls: Retail Workers in New York City (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Shop Girls: Retail Workers in New York City
Author: Su Ku
Author: Eileen Karp
Abstract: Film and television clips: The Shop Around the Corner (Ernst Lubitsch, 1940); Le amiche/The Girlfriends (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1955); Hester Street (Joan Micklin Silver, 1975); Nine to Five (Colin Higgins, 1980); El tiempo entre costuras/The Time in Between (TV series, 2013-2014) Clips will focus on issues of gender in the workplace, with attention to general issues pertaining to both retail and corporate environments, and specific case studies of the fashion industry. Some sample activities the students may participate in: a) identify the career trajectory of the male versus female protagonists in their sales positions. What do you expect will happens in terms of job security, opportunities for promotion, wage increases, co-worker and customer relations? b) using the fashions created by the designers in the films/TV series, create two separate business models,: one that you would believe would be successful in the time period in which the show/film is based, and one for today. Present these business strategies to the class. What are the similarities/differences between these models and how are they influenced by historical, economic, and cultural factors? c) list the innovations the female protagonists introduce in their office. In small groups, create a proposal for further changes that specifically address the issues raised in the film. How do they address issues of sexual harassment, gender parity, work-family balance, flexibility, and overall improvement to the physical work environment? Pay special attention to issues such as race, class, and physical disability.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Virtual Exhibition: Picturing Labor in Art and Design Industry (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Virtual Exhibition: Picturing Labor in Art and Design Industry
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Elizabeth Way
Abstract: Students will create an online multimedia exhibit documenting the history of labor in New York City in a chosen industry and how it has changed to this day. Students will advance their research skills using digital tools as well as local resources at the Research Library at the New York Public Library and the archives at institutions including the New-York Historical Society, the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, El Museo del Barrio, and the Museum of the City of New York.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Analyzing Bauhaus in Business and Labor History for Art and Design Students (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Analyzing Bauhaus in Business and Labor History for Art and Design Students
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: A century ago, Bauhaus was an experimental and innovative group of design instructors and students. The school became a modern art movement characterized by its unique approach to architecture and design. Although not much is known about business operations of Bauhaus, the school’s philosophy emphasized solidarity among industrial workers. Fashion Institute of Technology received a federal grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for three years to manage a project entitled “Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students.” For two years, Dan Levinson Wilk and Kyunghee Pyun, co-PIs of this project have hosted faculty seminars with participating professors of multidisciplinary fields such as Business Management, Production Management, Interior Design, Illustration, Graphic Design, and Fashion Design. This paper presents pragmatic and philosophical problems of presenting Bauhaus in a typical survey of art and design and why Bauhaus is still an important case of business history relevant to art and design curriculum.
Date: 09/06/2019
Primary URL: https://www.designhistorysociety.org/conferences/view/dhs-2019-the-cost-of-design
Primary URL Description: Conference webpage of Design History Society's 2019 Annual Conference
Secondary URL: https://costofdesign2019.com/conference-programme-3/
Secondary URL Description: Conference programme webpage, Cost of Design, 2019 Annual Conference of Design History Society
Conference Name: The Cost of Design. 2019 Conference for Design History Society at University of Northumbria, U.K., co-hosted by The Business of the Bauhaus (Esther Cleven, Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin and Jeremy Aynsley, University of Brighton), 5–7 September 2019 (Organizer: E

Vanishing Cultures, Vanishing Communities: The Nomads and the Weavers of Taurus Mountains, Turkey (Exhibition)
Title: Vanishing Cultures, Vanishing Communities: The Nomads and the Weavers of Taurus Mountains, Turkey
Curator: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: This exhibition presents invisible aspects of labor and natural surroundings to produce raw materials of fashion industry: pashmina goats and nomadic families in Anatolia. In New York City, Fashion Institute of Technology, Gladys Marcus Library’s Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition, Vanishing Communities, Vanishing Cultures: The Yörüks of Taurus Mountains, Turkey--A Visual Ethnography. The exhibition opened on February 3 and closes on April 3, 2020. Yörüks are nomads living across Taurus Mountains for hundreds of years. Professor Praveen Chaudhry and his team’s ethnographic documentary and accompanying photographs present the lives of these people, obviously overwhelmed by globalization and industrialization. 44 compelling photos of individual families living in Taurus Mountains are displayed inside the Gladys Marcus Library on the fifth floor of the Shirley Goodman Center, Fashion Institute of Technology on West 27th Street and Seventh Avenue in Chelsea, New York City. Photos are grouped by about twelve families who have lived as a distinctive community scattered around the vast pasture of Taurus Mountains. Professor Kyunghee Pyun at Fashion Institute of Technology is curator of this exhibition.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://www.fitnyc.edu/library/about/exhibits/vanishing-communities-cultures.php
Primary URL Description: Exhibition homepage as part of the FIT Library's website
Secondary URL: //news.fitnyc.edu/event/exhibition-vanishing-community-vanishing-cultures-the-yoruks-of-taurus-mountains-turkey-opens/
Secondary URL Description: College news webpage announcing the opening of the exhibition

Business and Labor History in Art and Design Programs—Pedagogical Innovations. Roundtable Workshop. (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Business and Labor History in Art and Design Programs—Pedagogical Innovations. Roundtable Workshop.
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Author: Yunah Lee
Abstract: Through their art history departments, art and design schools do a good job teaching students the history of the things they will be making. They learn less about the history of the careers they will be pursuing. At the Fashion Institute of Technology, an interdisciplinary team of faculty from the fields of fashion design, interior design, photography, fashion business management, communication design, home products development, sociology, history, and art history is creating new lesson plans and curricula. We hope to better teach students how people have shaped and reshaped the experience of a job or career in art or design, especially over the last two centuries, to show where the levers of power tend to be, and how they, too, might shape capitalism. We would like to hold a workshop panel at the EBHA to demonstrate and offer training in a couple of techniques. First Kyunghee Pyun and Daniel Levinson Wilk, who created the project and jointly administer the grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities that funds it, will briefly describe the project’s genesis and purpose. Then they, other members of the panel, and the audience will role-play two class activities from the new curriculum. Then we will discuss the activities, and help audience members brainstorm other ideas for curriculum about the labor history of artists and designers.
Date Range: 08/29/2019 to 08/31/2019
Location: Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Primary URL: https://www.eur.nl/en/eshcc/research/ebha2019
Primary URL Description: Main Page of the European Business History Association (EBHA) 23rd Annual Conference in Rotterdam (2019) Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication Erasmus University Rotterdam
Secondary URL: https://www.eur.nl/en/eshcc/research/ebha2019/congress-programme
Secondary URL Description: Congress Programme Webpage

Tailoring American Business and Labor History for Art and Design Curriculum. Roundtable Session. (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Tailoring American Business and Labor History for Art and Design Curriculum. Roundtable Session.
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Author: Carol Quirke
Author: Jonathan Square
Abstract: In this experimental session, historians and art historians present their most effective and least expected tool of addressing issues of business and labor history. This “tool” can be a technological platform or an excerpt from someone’s biography. It could be a clip from a movie or a song from the 70s. Or Andy Warhol’s works of art can be an illuminating example for queering advertising industry in the 70s. FIT faculty members were pursuing ways in which to engage fellow artists and designers as well as students aspiring to grab jobs in creative industry. In this experimental session, business and labor historians are invited to expose their toolkits, well known or secretive, to lead a discussion for pedagogical innovations. One could share frustration over inefficacy or redundancy of digital databases while some may exalt the audience with potential impact of AI-assisted visual analysis of old magazine photographs. In a loosely formatted, experimental session, presenters and audiences can dismantle the disciplinary boundaries and pose thought-provoking questions of what to use to better disseminate learnings of business and labor history.
Date Range: 01/03/2020-01/06/2020
Location: Hilton New York, New York City
Primary URL: https://www.historians.org/about-aha-and-membership/annual-meeting/program
Primary URL Description: Main webpage of The 134th Annual Meeting, American Historical Association (AHA)
Secondary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2020/webprogram/Session19594.html
Secondary URL Description: Webpage of the Roundtable Session

Lesson Plan: Dorothea Lange and Work/Life Balance (Database/Archive/Digital Edition)
Title: Lesson Plan: Dorothea Lange and Work/Life Balance
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Abstract: This lesson plan provides three to four prompts to facilitate classroom discussions in case of Dorothea Lange, a woman photographer.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://businesshistory.fitnyc.edu/lesson-plan-dorothea-lange-and-work-life-balance/
Primary URL Description: The landing page of this lesson plan
Secondary URL: https://businesshistory.fitnyc.edu/category/resources/lesson-plans/
Secondary URL Description: More lesson plans will be added in this category.
Access Model: Open Access

Interviews and Oral Histories (Database/Archive/Digital Edition)
Title: Interviews and Oral Histories
Author: Karen Trivette
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Author: Joseph Anderson
Author: Eileen Karp
Abstract: A selection of interviews with fashion industry professionals is collected in this webpage. Instructors will use these video clips. More will be created during the project period. Some had been created by the Special Collections of Fashion Institute of Technology's Gladys Marcus Library and carefully chosen for this site.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://businesshistory.fitnyc.edu/category/resources/interviews/
Primary URL Description: Landing webpage for this category of Interviews and Oral Histories within a larger website of Businesshistory.fitnyc.edu (created for this NEH-funded project)
Access Model: Open Access

Business of Contemporary Art in the Demise of Small or Mid-Size Galleries (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Business of Contemporary Art in the Demise of Small or Mid-Size Galleries
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: Between 2015 and 2017, 46 small or mid-size galleries, reputable in the field, went out of business in New York while demand for contemporary work has risen five-fold since 2000. Despite growth in the total amount of sales, only 25 artists are responsible for almost half of all postwar and contemporary art auction sales. In 2017, work by this small group of elite artists sold for a combined $1.2 billion—44.6 percent of the $2.7 billion total generated by all contemporary public auction sales worldwide. People like Robert Cenedella, a professor at the Art Students League of New York, accused major museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art of conspiracy to control art markets, domestic and international, by promoting artists, very few, whose works they own in the collection. If the artists gain more recognition as pioneer who made an impact on contemporary art as is argued in scholarly essays for a special exhibition, the total value of the institutions’ holdings would be increased. Papers in this session discuss issues such as changing conditions of primary and secondary markets; demise of small or mid-size galleries; rise of public art; growing business expenses; choices made by artists as alternatives to a gallery system; amending a standard gallery contract; transformation of an artist’s careers; monopoly of few giant galleries; demographic changes of collectors; and other crucial perspectives.
Date Range: 02/13/2019-02/16/2019
Location: New York City
Primary URL: https://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/conference2019/schedule
Primary URL Description: 2019 Annual Conference by College Art Association
Secondary URL: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2019/meetingapp.cgi/Session/2503
Secondary URL Description: Session webpage

Contemporary Art Contemplates the Garment Industry: Visible and Invisible Realities (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Contemporary Art Contemplates the Garment Industry: Visible and Invisible Realities
Author: Kyunghee Pyun
Abstract: Currently involved with “Teaching Business and Labor History to Art and Design Students” funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the faculty conversations at Fashion Institute of Technology have generated much interest in realities and imaginations of careers in textiles and clothing manufacture. In the fast fashion trends represented by the H&M, Zara, and Forever 21 and the like, consumers are now more aware of ethical and environmental consequences as well as socio-economic injustices stemming from their purchases. Labor strikes out of textile mills and clothing factories in the twentieth century have much studied in the context of labor organizations but not in the context of business history of careers in art and design. Some contemporary artists comment on the disappearance of artisanal villages or traditional communities in Southeast Asia or China. This paper will focus on three to four cases of contemporary art making with these communities by considering conscious or unconscious legacies of colonialism and imperial exploitation embedded in lives of these people. Artists to be included are Patty Chang (Route 3, 2011; 3-channel video installations collaborated with David Kelley); Kevin Beasley (Rebuilding of the Cotton Gin Motor II, 2016; installation); Jaye Rhee (Seasaw, 2003; 5-channel video installations); Do-ho Suh (Almost Home, 2018; immersive architectural installations). The paper argues that visible or invisible realities of labor concerning textiles, sewing, repairing, audible noises, dusty air, and some music are inseparable in perception of some contemporary art practices involving rural and urban communities of garment workers and mass consumers.
Date: 02/14/2020
Primary URL: https://www.collegeart.org/programs/conference/conference2020/schedule
Primary URL Description: 2020 Annual Conference Website
Secondary URL: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2020/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/8625
Secondary URL Description: Presenter's page (Pyun)
Conference Name: 108th College Art Association Annual Conference 2020 Chicago

Fashion History Illustrated (Course or Curricular Material)
Title: Fashion History Illustrated
Author: Su Ku
Abstract: For my fashion history class (FF121), I added labor emphasis throughout the lessons. In particular, women as textile makers/weavers and formation of guilds in the Middle Ages in promoting particular quality control on fabrics. My lesson plans include (since our NEH sessions) the history of the cotton textile industry that fuels industrial revolution. The slavery of South that provided fiber to English factories and labor conditions of the new manufactuers.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Teaching Fashion Labor at the Fashion Institute of Technology (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Teaching Fashion Labor at the Fashion Institute of Technology
Author: Daniel Levinson Wilk
Author: Karen Trivette
Author: Eileen Karp
Abstract: Labor in the Creative Industries: The Case of Fashion is an international conference held in Oslo, Norway. The panel with three FIT faculty members focuses on pedagogical strategies of how to teach the notion of labor and workplace injustice.
Date Range: 06/11/2019-06/12/2019
Location: Oslo, Norway
Primary URL: https://www.fashionlaborconference.com/
Primary URL Description: Main website for the conference


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