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Products for grant FA-232263-16

FA-232263-16
American Presidents and the History of Photography from the Daguerreotype to the Digital Revolution
Cara Finnegan, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-232263-16

Pursuing Grant-Funded Research in Communication: Challenges and Opportunities across the Discipline (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Pursuing Grant-Funded Research in Communication: Challenges and Opportunities across the Discipline
Author: Cara A. Finnegan
Abstract: An informal presentation about my experience seeking NEH funding, on a panel featuring other communication scholars who have received federal funding for research (e.g., NSF, NIH).
Date: 11-11-2016
Conference Name: National Communication Association

Photographing Washington: American Presidents and the History of Photography (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Photographing Washington: American Presidents and the History of Photography
Author: Cara A. Finnegan
Abstract: Almost as soon as Americans started making daguerreotypes, they made daguerreotypes of George Washington. The fact that he was unavailable to be photographed from life, it seems, was no major obstacle. Though he died in 1799 – a full forty years before photography’s invention – the nation’s first president appeared nevertheless as a subject in daguerreotypes of busts, painted portraits, and prints, ironically making daguerreotypes of Washington’s image some of the earliest presidential photographs. My presentation, adapted from the introduction to my NEH-funded book project, explores some of the possible reasons why.
Date: 11-11-2016
Primary URL: http://www.carafinnegan.com/work-in-progress.html
Conference Name: National Communication Association

The Candid Camera and the Changing Visual Values of Political Space (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Candid Camera and the Changing Visual Values of Political Space
Author: Cara A. Finnegan
Abstract: Scholars of rhetoric and political communication have for decades argued that the rise of television transformed rhetoric’s political spaces. Yet television was not the first visual medium to do so; other visual antecedents are worth attending to as well. Beginning in the late 1920s, a new kind of photography appeared in Europe and the United States, made possible by small, portable cameras capable of producing intimate photographs of seemingly unguarded subjects. These “miniature” or “candid cameras” provided photographers with a decidedly different way to picture political actors. Of the dramatic difference between the candid camera and its heavier, larger predecessors, one writer of the era said it was like an “express rifle had been substituted for a pea shooter.” In 1929, the term “candid camera” was coined by the London Daily Graphic to describe the work of German photographer Erich Salomon, whose specialty became the photography of political spaces. Salomon made unposed images of European leaders and diplomats at international conferences and later brought his candid camera to bear on political elites in the U.S. This paper analyzes Salomon’s photographs and the public conversation about them to show how the candid camera transformed ideas about political space in Europe and the U.S. between 1928-1932. By taking advantage of the candid camera’s ability to foreshorten the physical space between photographer and subject, Salomon’s images offered the political sphere new visual values of access, intimacy, and energy. The project illustrates the value of attending to those historically-specific moments when technological change reshapes our real and imagined rhetorical-political spaces.
Date: 7-28-2017
Primary URL: http://ishr-web.org/aws/ISHR/pt/sp/conference
Primary URL Description: International Society for the History of Rhetoric 2017 Conference
Conference Name: International Society for the History of Rhetoric


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