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Products for grant FA-232741-16

FA-232741-16
Phoenician Networks in the Mediterranean from Greece to Iberia, ca. 700-500 BCE
Carolina López-Ruiz, Ohio State University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-232741-16

The Phoenicians and the Making of the Mediterranean: A View from Tartessos,” Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology, Brown University (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Phoenicians and the Making of the Mediterranean: A View from Tartessos,” Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology, Brown University
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: This talked discusses my research on the Phoenician cultural impact in the western Mediterranean as well as the issues regarding the orientaliizng phenomenon across the Mediterranean and the Phoenicians' role in impulsing this process, an agency which is often overlooked by classicist and art historians.
Date: 10/5/2016.

“Phoenician networks from the Aegean to Iberia: rethinking the ‘orientalizing’ Mediterranean,” American University of Beirut (Department of History and Archaeology), Lebanon (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Phoenician networks from the Aegean to Iberia: rethinking the ‘orientalizing’ Mediterranean,” American University of Beirut (Department of History and Archaeology), Lebanon
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: Discussion of the role of the Phoenicians in the spread of Near Eastern culture throughout the Mediterranean from the Aegean to Iberia, during the co-called "orientalizing period" (8th-7th centuries BCE). Discussion of methodological porblems regarding the interpretation of this process in different countries and disciplines (Classics, western Mediterranean archaeology)
Date: 10/20/2016

Lecture/seminar about Tartessos and colonization in Iberia for students at University of San Marcos, Lima (Perú) (Skype). (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Lecture/seminar about Tartessos and colonization in Iberia for students at University of San Marcos, Lima (Perú) (Skype).
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: A lecture on the archaeology of Phoenician colonization and cultural influence in Iberia and its comparison with the Aegean and other areas of the Mediterranean.
Date: 12/5/2016

Occidentalism, or Why the Phoenicians Matter: Scholarly Approaches to Cultural Contact in the Mediterranean (ca. 800-600 BCE),” Society of Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Toronto (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Occidentalism, or Why the Phoenicians Matter: Scholarly Approaches to Cultural Contact in the Mediterranean (ca. 800-600 BCE),” Society of Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Toronto
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: Discussion of methodological problems regarding the interpretation of Phoenician presence and the "orientalizng phenomenon" in different countries and disciplines (Classics, western Mediterranean archaeology).
Date: 1/6/2017

The Phoenicians and the ‘Orientalizing’ Mediterranean: a View from Tartessos,” 2017 Octopus Lecture, Oxford Centre for Phoenician and Punic Studies, Oxford, (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Phoenicians and the ‘Orientalizing’ Mediterranean: a View from Tartessos,” 2017 Octopus Lecture, Oxford Centre for Phoenician and Punic Studies, Oxford,
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: This talked discusses my research on the Phoenician cultural impact in the western Mediterranean as well as the issues regarding the orientaliizng phenomenon across the Mediterranean and the Phoenicians' role in impulsing this process, an agency which is often overlooked by classicist and art historians.
Date: 3/29/2017

We Need to Talk about the Phoenicians,” conference on “The Connected Iron Age: Interregional Networks in the Eastern Mediterranean, 900-600 BCE,” University of Chicago (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: We Need to Talk about the Phoenicians,” conference on “The Connected Iron Age: Interregional Networks in the Eastern Mediterranean, 900-600 BCE,” University of Chicago
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: This talk discusses the disciplinary positions in which the Phoenicians are deconstructed as a sort of fiction created by the classical (Greco-Roman) sources, and presents a case for the cohessiveness of their culture and their agency as cultural transmitters in the Iron Age Mediterranean.
Date: 1/13/2018

• “Not That Which Can Be Found Among the Greeks”: Philo of Byblos and Phoenician Cultural Identity in the Roman East,” Religion in the Roman Empire 3/3 (2017). Special issue, The revival or Reinvention of Non-Roman Religion under Roman Imperial Rule (eds. (Article)
Title: • “Not That Which Can Be Found Among the Greeks”: Philo of Byblos and Phoenician Cultural Identity in the Roman East,” Religion in the Roman Empire 3/3 (2017). Special issue, The revival or Reinvention of Non-Roman Religion under Roman Imperial Rule (eds.
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: In this essay, I offer a fresh discussion of the socio-cultural, literary, and religious environs of Philo and his audience, informed by recent discussions on literature and identity in the Roman east, which mostly focus on other genres and where Philo is often not present or well integrated. This view helps us better understand and accept the tensions and paradoxes inherent in Philo’s project. I have argued that his intellectual identity leans on a well-grounded sense of pride on Phoenician culture cultivated in his time beyond the traditional coastal Phoenician territory. To make things more complex, this identity, in turn, is built on the long-lasting dialogue between Greek and Phoenician cultures. In any case, Philo’s Phoenician History was not merely an ‘internal’ (Graeco-Roman) antiquarian exercise. Neither is it obviously a ‘purist’ product of Phoenician mythology. It was rather part of a broader cultural project driven by the anxieties experienced by a rapidly threatened, perhaps fading, Phoenician identity in a region where the Greek and local pasts (real or imagined) were intimately interlocked and competed for prestige and, ultimately, survival. Arguably, these voices need not represent widespread cultural movements, let alone ethnic ones. But at a minimum they represent self-conscious efforts to inflect particular groups or individuals with local or regional distinctiveness within an increasingly homogeneous Roman oikoumene.
Year: 2017
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Religion in the Roman Empire

Gargoris and Habis: An Iberian Myth and Phoenician Euhemerism (Article)
Title: Gargoris and Habis: An Iberian Myth and Phoenician Euhemerism
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: The story of Gargoris and Habis in Justin’s Epitome is usually read as a Greek-oriented version of a local myth from Iberia. The structure and motifs in the story, however, draw from Near Eastern traditions, i.e., of succession myths and “first inventors,” and a variety of euhemerism circulating in the Phoenician-Carthaginian sphere.
Year: 2018
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Phoenix

• “Greek Literature and the Lost Legacy of Canaan,” in J. Aruz, ed. From Assyria to Iberia. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017, 316-21. (Book Section)
Title: • “Greek Literature and the Lost Legacy of Canaan,” in J. Aruz, ed. From Assyria to Iberia. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017, 316-21.
Author: Carolina Lopez-Ruiz
Abstract: This book chapter discusses the porblems with our study of the Phoenician legacy in the Iron Age Mediterranean as we do not have literary sources from this culture, but can reconstructe their legacy through archaeological and comparative evidence, which shows their important role in the spread of Near Easetrn culture.
Year: 2017
Publisher: The Metropolitan Museum of Art


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