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Products for grant FA-251827-17

FA-251827-17
Patients’ Activism in the Culion Leper Colony, Philippines, 1905-1930s
Febe Pamonag, Western Illinois University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-251827-17

Songs, Rumors, and Resistance (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Songs, Rumors, and Resistance
Abstract: How do marginalized groups challenge authorities? One problem that confronts historians who deal with this question is the lack of sources generated by those individuals. The problem is compounded when dealing with the resistance of colonized and diseased people. Consequently, historians are compelled to use materials that, in the words of Kerri Inglis, "require considerable imagination and creativity." In this presentation, we will explore creative ways to study the history of marginalized groups, like the leprosy patients in colonial Philippines. We will consider songs and rumors as platforms for challenging American colonial authority in the early twentieth-century Philippines.
Author: Febe Pamonag
Date: 9/18/2017
Location: Spoon River College Community Outreach Center, Macomb, IL

The Unruly Women of Culion (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Unruly Women of Culion
Author: Febe Pamonag
Abstract: Public health was crucial to the success of the American pacification campaign and the “civilizing process” in the Philippines during the early twentieth century. In 1905, American colonial officials established a leper colony in Culion, southwest of Manila. To safeguard public health, officials deemed it necessary to forcibly remove “lepers” from their homes; however, in 1907, citing limited resources and the difficulty of pregnancy for women with leprosy, they banned cohabitation and marriage within Culion. Colonial officials had downplayed Filipino leprosy patients’ opposition to the segregation order. But how did female patients respond to the segregation policy? How did they engage with authorities over such issues as the ban on cohabitation and marriage? This paper advances our understanding of the engagement between Filipino women leprosy patients and colonial officials. This is an understudied theme in literature on empire, medicine, and public health, and U.S. colonialism in the Philippines. Very few studies of Culion address patients’ – mostly men – oppositional views and practices. I argue that female patients, individually and collectively, asserted their sense of self and in so doing, rejected the notion of women as weak, mere followers of the male patients and wards of the nuns and the state.
Date: 8/12/2018
Conference Name: International Federation for Research in Women’s History (IFRWH) triennial conference

'Mobs' and the Women of Culion (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: 'Mobs' and the Women of Culion
Author: Febe Pamonag
Abstract: Beginning in 1906, American colonial officials ordered the mandatory confinement of leprosy patients to the island of Culion, in western Philippines. American colonial authorities had downplayed Filipino opposition to the leper segregation policy. This paper examines how gender-based assumptions, state policies, and practices influenced reports on how the patients responded to gender segregation within the leper colony. Initially implemented in 1907, restrictions on marriage and cohabitation generated several protests, including the 1932 protest dubbed “The Manchuria.” There is a paucity of sources written by the patients, but there are newspaper articles, government reports, and accounts of American colonial officials, nuns, and priests. This paper seeks to advance our understanding of Filipino leprosy patients’ engagement with American colonial authorities. This is an understudied theme in the existing literature on empire and public health policy and U.S. colonialism in the Philippines. Earlier studies on Filipino leprosy patients’ resistance tend to focus on men. In this paper, I argue that some female patients asserted their sense of self and in so doing, rejected the notion of women as weak, mere followers of male patients and wards of the nuns and the state.
Date: 4/28/2018
Primary URL: http://www.wawh.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/WAWHProgram2018FinalMarch17.pdf
Primary URL Description: 2018 Western Association of Women Historians Conference program
Conference Name: Western Association of Women Historians


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