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FA-252070-17
Annotation for Education in the Princeton/Brussels Copy of the 1525 Edition of Ptolemy’s Geography
Chet Van Duzer,

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-252070-17

“Distant Sons of Adam: A Newly Discovered Early Voice on the Origin of the Peoples of the New World” (Article)
Title: “Distant Sons of Adam: A Newly Discovered Early Voice on the Origin of the Peoples of the New World”
Author: Chet Van Duzer
Abstract: One of the many intellectual problems that faced Europeans following the discovery of the New World was how those lands had been populated before their European discovery, if all humans had descended from Adam and Eve. One hypothesis to account for the presence of Amerindian peoples was based on a passage in the pseudo-Aristotelian De mirabilibus auscultationibus, which spoke of Carthaginian navigators discovering a large island in the Atlantic. Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo in his Historia general de las Indias (1535) was believed to be the first to suggest that this passage showed that the New World had been discovered and populated in antiquity, and this theory was maintained by many later authors. In this article I examine anonymous annotations relating to the New World in a copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy’s Geography now split between Princeton and a private collection in Brussels. The annotator proposes this same theory about eight years before Oviedo, and I suggest that the theory was transmitted from the annotator to Oviedo by way of Willibald Pirckheimer’s Germaniae explicatio (1530, 1532). In fact, of the authors whose writings survive today, the annotator seems to have been the first not just to have proposed the Carthaginian origin for the native peoples of the New World, but the first to propose any theory to account for their presence.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.brepolsonline.net/doi/abs/10.1484/J.VIATOR.5.112363
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Viator 47.3, pp. 365-385
Publisher: Belgium: Brepols Publishers

Schemes of Annotation in Copies of Ptolemy’s Geography at the Lilly Library, Library of Congress, and Princeton (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Schemes of Annotation in Copies of Ptolemy’s Geography at the Lilly Library, Library of Congress, and Princeton
Author: Chet Van Duzer
Abstract: Claudius Ptolemy wrote his Geography in the second century A,D., and following its rediscovery in Constantinople in about 1300, it became one of the most popular geographical texts of the European Renaissance, copied in many manuscripts and printed in many editions. But Ptolemy offers very little in the way of description of different regions and peoples, so the work came to be supplemented in various ways. Non-Ptolemaic descriptive texts were added to printed editions of the book, and users of the book added descriptive material from various sources, providing excellent evidence regarding the reception of the work and early modern reading practices. In this talk I will examine the schemes of annotation in four different copies of the Geography: the 1511 Thacher copy at the Library of Congress; the copy of the 1513 edition at the Lilly Library; the 1486 Thacher copy at the Library of Congress; and the copy of the 1525 edition at Princeton. By comparing these different schemes of annotation I will bring out the extraordinary nature of the annotations in the Princeton 1525 Ptolemy, which is the object of my current NEH-Mellon fellowship research.
Date: 7/27/2017
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtmeBNWrLrU
Primary URL Description: A video of the talk.
Conference Name: Stand alone talk at the Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress

The (Ptolemaic) World is Not Enough: Annotation for Education in the Princeton Copy of Ptolemy’s Geography, 1525 (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The (Ptolemaic) World is Not Enough: Annotation for Education in the Princeton Copy of Ptolemy’s Geography, 1525
Author: Chet Van Duzer
Abstract: The talk offers a brief discussion of the elaborate program of manuscript annotation in Princeton's copy of the 1525 edition of Ptolemy's Geography. The annotations were composed c. 1527, and are addressed to a student, and thus the annotations represent a program of geographical education in the early sixteenth century. The annotations were written by a scribe and their layout in the book was organized with great care, indicating that this copy was made for a very wealthy client. The annotator adds few references to modern history, but instead devotes his efforts to supplementing Ptolemy with descriptive texts culled from classical geographers, and from compilations such as Caelius Rhodiginus's Lectionum antiquarium and Marco Antonio Sabellico's Rapsodiae Historiarum Enneadum. In the Princeton copy, the annotated maps were combined with the unnanotated text of another copy of the book; the text of the 1525 edition annotated by the same annotator, which originally formed part of the same book with the Princeton maps, has been identified in a private collection in Europe.
Date: 8/31/2017
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnnKhm0uXGI
Primary URL Description: A video of the talk.
Conference Name: A talk at the Kluge Center at the Library of Congress.


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