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Products for Grant FA-53734-08

FA-53734-08
Forbidden Goods: The History of Cross-Cultural Trade in Islamic Law
Leor Halevi, Texas A & M University, College Station

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-53734-08

Christian Impurity versus Economic Necessity: A Fifteenth-Century Fatwa on European Paper (Article)
Title: Christian Impurity versus Economic Necessity: A Fifteenth-Century Fatwa on European Paper
Author: Leor Halevi
Abstract: This article is an in-depth examination of a religious edict by a Muslim jurist concerning European paper. This product caused some controversy in Muslim circles because it contained watermarks of the cross and other Christian symbols. But the North African jurist -- in one of our earliest and most complex responses to the rise of the West -- actually finds religious justifications for using the foreign product.
Year: 2008
Primary URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=6669180
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Speculum
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The Consumer Jihad: Boycott Fatwas and Nonviolent Resistance on the World Wide Web (Article)
Title: The Consumer Jihad: Boycott Fatwas and Nonviolent Resistance on the World Wide Web
Author: Leor Halevi
Abstract: This article deals with the origins, development, and popularity of boycott fatwas. Born of the marriage of Islamic politics and Islamic economics in an age of digital communications, these fatwas targeted American, Israeli, and Danish commodities between 2000 and 2006. Muftis representing both mainstream and, surprisingly, radical tendencies argued that jihad can be accomplished through nonviolent consumer boycotts. Their argument marks a significant development in the history of jihad doctrine because boycotts, construed as jihadi acts, do not belong to the commonplace categories of jihad as a “military” or a “spiritual” struggle. The article also demonstrates that boycott fatwas emerged, to a large degree, from below. New media, in particular interconnected computer networks, made it easier for laypersons to drive the juridical discourse. They did so before September 11 as well as, more insistently, afterward. Their consumer jihad had some economic impact on targeted multinationals, and it provoked corporate reactions.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=8480779&jid=MES&volumeId=44&issueId=01&aid=8480777
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: International Journal of Middle East Studies
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Religion and Cross-Cultural Trade: A Framework for Interdisciplinary Inquiry (Article)
Title: Religion and Cross-Cultural Trade: A Framework for Interdisciplinary Inquiry
Author: Leor Halevi
Abstract: na
Year: 2014
Format: Other
Periodical Title: Religion and Trade: Cross-Cultural Exchanges in World History, 1000-1900
Publisher: New York: Oxford University Press


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