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Products for grant FA-57141-13

FA-57141-13
Conflict and Democracy in Classic American Fiction
Sandra Gustafson, University of Notre Dame

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-57141-13

"Equality as Singularity: Rethinking Literature and Democracy" (Article)
Title: "Equality as Singularity: Rethinking Literature and Democracy"
Author: Sandra M. Gustafson
Abstract: This article considers the work of political theorists Pierre Rosanvallon and Danielle Allen in relation to evolving meanings of democracy. It then draws on their theories in readings of novels by Saul Bellow, Upton Sinclair, and Orhan Pamuk.
Year: 2015
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: New Literary History
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

"Henry Adams, political reform, and the legacy of the Republican Roman Senate" (Article)
Title: "Henry Adams, political reform, and the legacy of the Republican Roman Senate"
Author: Sandra M. Gustafson
Abstract: This essay examines references to the Senate of the Roman Republic in several of the early writings of Henry Adams. It looks particularly at his journalism and reform writings of the 1860s and 70s, and culminates in an analysis of his novel Democracy from 1880. Adams’ great-grandfather John was a leading proponent of a senate in the deliberations over the U.S. Constitution. For Henry, the intellectual and political legacy represented by the Senate crystallized political problems including the appropriate balance of power, the nature of representation, the threat of tyranny, and the dangers of party and personal corruption. Adams was closely engaged with historiographical debates in England and Germany over ancient republics and the lessons they held for modern ones such as the United States. His portrait of the corrupt senator Silas Ratcliffe in Democracy resonates in particular with Theodore Mommsen’s treatment of Cicero. In The History of Rome, Mommsen rejected the heroic image of Cicero as the father of his country and presented instead a portrait in which the Roman senator’s self-interest predominated. At the same time he burnished Caesar’s image as a dictator who loved the people. Mommsen’s critique of Cicero echoes through Democracy, which concludes in some despair over the prospects of the American democratic system while offering no compensatory, heroic Caesar-figure.
Year: 2015
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Classical Receptions Journal
Publisher: Oxford University Press

"Literature and Peace Studies" (Article)
Title: "Literature and Peace Studies"
Author: Sandra M. Gustafson
Abstract: This article draws on concepts from the field of peace studies and relates them to novels about the Iraq War. It will appear in a collection in a volume slated to appear with Oxford University Press.
Year: 2015


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