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Products for grant FA-57954-14

FA-57954-14
Of Abbeys and Aldermen: Music in Ghent to 1559
Barbara Haggh-Huglo, University of Maryland, College Park

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FA-57954-14

Music and Migration as Opportunity in Medieval and Renaissance Ghent (Flanders) (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Music and Migration as Opportunity in Medieval and Renaissance Ghent (Flanders)
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Closing lecture (conferencia de clausura) at Cologne Summer School: 'Serendipia: Migracion como oportunidad', University of Cologne, Germany The city of Ghent, the most populous north of Paris in the fourteenth century, was established with its town council around the sites of the castle of the Counts of Flanders and two very old and important Benedictine abbeys, St Bavo’s and St Peter’s, both founded in the seventh century. The turbulent history of this major Flemish city offers instructive examples of migration – of people and of music: a forced migration of the two abbey communities after Viking invasions to the refugee community of intellectuals in Laon led to defining changes in liturgy and music in Ghent in the tenth to twelfth centuries. In the thirteenth century, migrating clergy brought music for the local saints of Ghent to Prague and Pécs. Finally, between the late fifteenth century and 1559, the monks of St Bavo’s abbey were forced to migrate to the church of St John’s in Ghent, where they would constitute the chapter at St John’s, now renamed and raised in status to the cathedral of St Bavo. This migration forced the monks to adapt to their new environment by renouncing their monastic liturgy and music in favor of the internationally-renowned choral polyphony of the Low Countries, which was accomplished with assistance from leading musicians, including those of Emperor Charles V. Each of these migrations, including the first and last that were forced, proved to be opportunities for enhancing the status of the migrants by different means, which included music.
Date: 7-31-2016
Primary URL: http://lateinamerika.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de/26177.html?&L=1
Primary URL Description: Description of the Cologne Summer School 'Serendipia: Migracion como oportunidad'
Conference Name: Serendipia: Migracion como oportunidad

Music in Medieval and Renaissance Cities in Europe: The Case of Ghent in Belgium (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Music in Medieval and Renaissance Cities in Europe: The Case of Ghent in Belgium
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Formal abstract to be added later: I will discuss when, where, and which music was performed in the city of Ghent, with examples from different centuries. I will discuss patrons of music (the town administration, the churches, the nobility, private individuals), composers, and surviving music. The purpose of this lecture was to present a clear overview of what is known about music in a single European town - to be compared during the lecture to others - so that this might later be compared with what is known of the music history of Chinese towns.
Date: 11-10-2016
Conference Name: Early Music Festival, Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing China, November 8-11, 2016

Yale University, Institute of Sacred Music, Fellowship 2017-18 (Staff/Faculty/Fellow Position)
Name: Yale University, Institute of Sacred Music, Fellowship 2017-18
Abstract: Awarded Fellowship to study repetition and creativity in three sets of documents from Ghent: chant 'borrowed' from the Abbey of Cluny, saints' offices, and aldermen's registers. During the Fellowship time I gave several presentations, one now online and cited here, compared the chant of the St Bavo gradual to those of Cluniac monasteries, produced some 50 music examples for an edition of the chant for the patron saint of Ghent, Livinus, with my research assistant (Univ. Maryland), completed hundreds of entries in my database of fifteenth-century foundations, and prepared a project (for 2019) to evaluate the texts of the aldermen's registers using the DEEDS algoriths with a statistician from the University of Toronto. I also taught a course using my Ghent material, on Music in the Early Modern City, Yale University, MUSI 245 (spring 2018). I plan to submit the articles resulting from this work in fall 2018 and the book in spring 2019.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://ism.yale.edu/news/2017-2018-ism-fellows-announced
Primary URL Description: Announcement of Yale ISM Fellows, myself included
Secondary URL: https://www.arhu.umd.edu/news/barbara-haggh-huglo-receives-yale-institute-sacred-music-fellowship
Secondary URL Description: Announcement of Fellowship at the University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities website

Claude V. Palisca Summer Fellowship from the Renaissance Society of America for 2018 (Staff/Faculty/Fellow Position)
Name: Claude V. Palisca Summer Fellowship from the Renaissance Society of America for 2018
Abstract: Mapping and Placing Music in Europe, 1400-1520: The Evidence of Contracts Registered with City Councils: with this project I test my reading of the Ghent aldermen's registers of the fifteenth century with study in summer 2018 of comparable city council registers of ten European cities: Antwerp, Utrecht, Lyon, Reims, Rouen, Tours, Augsburg, Dresden, Hamburg, and Heidelberg.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.rsa.org/general/custom.asp?page=grants
Primary URL Description: Description of the Fellowship and application requirements - I received notification of the award by email.

Yale University, MUSI 245 Church Music in Early Cities, 700-1700 (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Yale University, MUSI 245 Church Music in Early Cities, 700-1700
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Course Description: This course explores the place and purpose of a great variety of Christian liturgical music in the European urban environment, its ever evolving and changing nature, and the economy of music as demonstrated by the practices of lay benefaction, from 700-1700. Expanded Course Description: In medieval and early modern Europe, Christian church music conveyed religious doctrine and often political messages by painting texts with sound, dramatizing liturgical movement or filling space, evoking devotion, memories, or emotions, and mirroring heaven, or hell. Often regulated and mostly fixed in writing (after ca 850), religious liturgical music was usually performed by professionals and taught or composed only by the best of those initiated in that art, even though most levels of society heard it. In this course, we explore Christian music in selected European cities, from 700-1700. We will identify the music heard by different religious communities and social classes, in spaces including cathedrals and parish churches, court and private oratories, monasteries and convents, and guild chapels and hospitals. Particular emphasis will be given to the place and purpose of liturgical music, its ever evolving and changing nature, and the economy of music as demonstrated by the practices of lay benefaction. Finally, we will discuss successes and failures in early church music in the urban environment and consider how these might improve music and its patronage in modern urban churches in the United States.
Year: 2018
Audience: Undergraduate

The Liturgy of Lay Foundations in Ghent, 1400 - 1500 (Radio/Audio Broadcast or Recording)
Title: The Liturgy of Lay Foundations in Ghent, 1400 - 1500
Writer: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Director: Yale Institute of Sacred Music
Producer: Yale Institute of Sacred Music
Abstract: The Liturgy of Lay Foundations in Ghent 1400-1500 Did the laity control worship at church altars outside the main choir in Ghent in the century before the Reformation? How can these lay liturgies be categorized? Were they always votive? In this presentation, I explore the liturgies of a variety of lay foundations and the extent to which they were personal, private, communal, or of political consequence. I argue for a different understanding of late-medieval liturgy, one that is mindful of those physically present or not and their role, and of such events as bread distributions, or essential objects, including paintings. Discussed are the liturgy for the dead and for series of votive masses, for the Mandatum, and for two foundations of wider import, that for a mass before the Adoration of the Lamb, and for a new Marian feast, the 'Recollectio festorum beate Marie virginis.'
Date: 04/16/2018
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIP2YwEeVXs
Primary URL Description: Youtube website
Access Model: open access
Format: Web

Medieval Offices from Ghent and Cambrai: Some Ways of Interpreting their Melodies (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Medieval Offices from Ghent and Cambrai: Some Ways of Interpreting their Melodies
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: A comparison of the repertory of plainchant offices for saints composed in Ghent and Cambrai in the 9th-12th centuries.
Date: 01/16/2017
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ew71tj2Ji8c
Primary URL Description: youtube video
Conference Name: The 'Historia' (organized by David Hiley, held at the Fondazione Levi, Venice, Italy)

Hearing and Teaching Music in Medieval Ghent (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Hearing and Teaching Music in Medieval Ghent
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: The paper will present what we know about music education and the kinds of music different classes of society heard in Ghent from manuscripts and archives of the 9th-early 16th centuries
Date: 07/11/2019
Conference Name: Invited plenary keynote lecture to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the International College Music Society in the Aula of the University of Ghent

Hearing the Topography of Music in Ghent: The Evidence of the Aldermen’s Registers (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Hearing the Topography of Music in Ghent: The Evidence of the Aldermen’s Registers
Abstract: Following a description of how foundations for music and liturgy were registered with the aldermen and entered into their large books, I surveyed the data available from these registers about choral singing, instrumental music, and instrument building (organs, bells). By comparing the yearly costs of the foundations, I argued that the foundation for the mass before the Van Eyck brothers Adoration of the Lamb was for a polyphonic mass. I then discussed how foundations might be used like micro-loans from individuals to churches to accomplish projects in churches today.
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Date: 11/16/2017
Location: Yale, Institute of Sacred Music, Public Lunchtime Presentation, Graduate Club, Yale University

Repetition, Creativity, and Value in Medieval Ghent (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Repetition, Creativity, and Value in Medieval Ghent
Abstract: Presentation of my Yale ISM Project for 2017-2018: I seek to identify what not just what creativity meant to people of that distant time, but what it was with respect to the use of what existed already. In short, I want to know what was created and what was repeated. I also want to determine the value of what was created – its cost, utility, or the esteem in which it was held, for example. I argue that this can be accomplished by combining data gathered from my analysis of three medieval primary source-types from the city of Ghent (in what is now Belgium) with broad interdisciplinary reading – of medieval theology, such as the theology of creation – never before considered for music, comparisons of music in cities, studies of repetition in mathematics, philosophy, biology, linguistics, education, and scholarship on the modern Church. This broad reading will lead me to new approaches to my data beyond those of statistics.
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Date: 09/20/2017
Location: Yale University, Divinity School, Great Hall

Music in the Early Modern City, 700-1700 (Univ Maryland College Park, School of Music, Fall 2018) (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Music in the Early Modern City, 700-1700 (Univ Maryland College Park, School of Music, Fall 2018)
Author: Barbara Haggh-Huglo
Abstract: Drawing on substantial scholarship in English, a wide range of historically informed sound recordings, my experience working in archives of this period across Europe (most recently Dresden, Hamburg, Utrecht, Lyon, Reims and others), and my preparations for a new historical performance project, I wish to compare the history of music in different cities in order to determine what is unique to particular cities, regional, or widespread, beginning with Rome (also Jerusalem and Istanbul for comparison), and closing with Venice, Amsterdam, Vienna, Paris, and again Rome. The topics to be discussed will be determined by the class, but can include strictly historical explorations of the professionalism of composing, performers of different ages (choirboys, adults), genders, and social standing; listeners, the spaces of musical performance and their social design, the economy of music: its producers, consumers, and advertisers; ethnomusicological approaches; philosophical approaches to the purpose of music, repetition vs creativity, music as sign, etc.; scientific approaches to music: the makeup of early instruments such as the organ; the use of music theory in education; numbers and notation; symbolism in public and religious music; and a range of other topics, including music manuscripts and archives, the writing, printing, transmission, and marketing of music, chant and liturgy, public ceremonies including processions and theater, and so on. There will be some transcription from early notation and some singing and acting in class. I also hope to organize a visit to the National Gallery of Art and bring in a speaker from the Art Department to discuss music in early paintings.
Year: 2018
Audience: Graduate


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