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FB-56460-12
The Spread of Phenomenology in Europe during the 20th Century
Edward Baring, Drew University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-56460-12

Anxiety in Translation: Naming Existentialism before Sartre (Article)
Title: Anxiety in Translation: Naming Existentialism before Sartre
Author: Edward Baring
Abstract: This article examines the international debate over the most appropriate name for what became known as ‘existentialism’. It starts by detailing the diverse strands of the Kierkegaard reception in Germany in the early inter-war period, which were given a variety of labels—Existentialismus, Existenzphilosophie, Existentialphilosophie and existentielle Philosophie—and shows how, as these words were translated into other languages, the differences between them were effaced. This process helps explain how over the 1930s a remarkably heterogeneous group of thinkers came to be included under the same label. The article then shows how the word ‘existentialism’ and its cognates in other languages gained prominence because they were considered to represent best the diversity and richness of the movement. In detailing this process the article helps elucidate how existentialism emerged as an international philosophy in the period immediately following World War II, and sheds light on the ambivalence with which many have viewed both the term and the philosophy it represents.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01916599.2014.926658
Primary URL Description: History of European Ideas (2015)
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: History of European Ideas
Publisher: Routledge

A Secular Kierkegaard: Confessional Readings of Heidegger before 1945 (Article)
Title: A Secular Kierkegaard: Confessional Readings of Heidegger before 1945
Author: Edward Baring
Abstract: In the early reception of Martin Heidegger in Europe, networks of religious philosophers and theologians, in particular dialectical theologians and neo-scholastics, helped carry Heidegger's thought throughout and beyond the German-speaking world. Despite the paucity of references to the Danish philosopher in Heidegger's Being and Time, these thinkers figured Heidegger as a “secular Kierkegaard.” Both groups read Being and Time as an ontological analysis of the human subject, but the dialectical theologians located the secularizing drive in Heidegger's ontology, while the neo-scholastics identified it in the restriction of that ontology to the human subject. The contradictory accounts rendered secularization suspect. When Jean Wahl in 1937 accounted for the difficulty of secularizing Kierkegaard's thought, Wahl's argument drew attention to the fractious confessional context for the Heidegger reception. The article considers the implications of this history for the use of the concept of secularization in intellectual history by examining the Löwith-Blumenberg controversy.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://ngc.dukejournals.org/content/42/1_124/67.abstract
Primary URL Description: New German Critique
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: New German Critique
Publisher: Duke University Press


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