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Products for grant FB-56857-13

FB-56857-13
Back from Canada: African North Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction
Adam Arenson, University of Texas, El Paso

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-56857-13

African North Americans and the War (New York Times) (Article)
Title: African North Americans and the War (New York Times)
Author: Adam Arenson
Abstract: One-hundred-and-fifty years ago, Americans went to war with themselves. Disunion revisits and reconsiders America's most perilous period -- using contemporary accounts, diaries, images and historical assessments to follow the Civil War as it unfolded. Join Disunion on Facebook »
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/06/african-north-americans-and-the-war/
Primary URL Description: Online commentary from the New York Times
Format: Newspaper
Periodical Title: New York Times
Publisher: New York Times

The Union's Fake Canadians (Blog Post)
Title: The Union's Fake Canadians
Author: Adam Arenson
Abstract: --
Date: 9/26/2014
Primary URL: http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/author/adam-arenson/
Website: nytimes.com

Crossing the Border after the Underground Railroad: The Emancipation Generation of African North Americans in the United States and Canada, 1860s-1930s (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Crossing the Border after the Underground Railroad: The Emancipation Generation of African North Americans in the United States and Canada, 1860s-1930s
Author: Adam Arenson
Abstract: A presentation of my ongoing research at a gathering of scholars and descendants of those I am studying.
Date: 9/4/2015
Primary URL: http://www.buxtonmuseum.com/hcoming/hc-reg-conf.html
Primary URL Description: Event co-hosted by The Harriet Tubman Institute of York University & Buxton Historical Society
Conference Name: 17th Annual US/Canadian History & Genealogy Conference

After the Underground Railroad: African North Americans and Transnational Reconstruction, 1860-1930 (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: After the Underground Railroad: African North Americans and Transnational Reconstruction, 1860-1930
Abstract: A discussion of ongoing research during my NEH fellowship.
Author: Adam Arenson
Date: 2/5/15
Location: Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples, York University, Toronto

African North American Genealogy Across the US-Canada Border with Adam Arenson (Radio/Audio Broadcast or Recording)
Title: African North American Genealogy Across the US-Canada Border with Adam Arenson
Director: Bernice Benett
Producer: Bernice Benett
Abstract: Dr. Adam Arenson discusses his ongoing research about African North Americans—those men and women, born free or enslaved, who crossed or re-crossed the U.S.-Canada border in the era of emancipation, Civil War, and Reconstruction. We will discuss how difficult it is to determine how many fugitive slaves and free blacks were in Canada; the history of the more than 600 African North Americans who returned to fight for the U.S. Colored Troops; the thousands more who returned to the United States in the decades that followed; the hundreds of men, women, and children who traveled north to Canada after emancipation; and even the reason Civil War records are filled with fake claims of Canadian and other citizenship.
Date: 06/09/2016
Primary URL: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bernicebennett/2016/06/10/african-north-american-genealogy-across-the-us-canada-border-with-adam-arenson
Access Model: open access
Format: Digital File
Format: Web

Crossing the Border after the Underground Railroad: The Emancipation African North Americans in the United States and Canada, 1860s-1930s (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Crossing the Border after the Underground Railroad: The Emancipation African North Americans in the United States and Canada, 1860s-1930s
Author: Adam Arenson
Abstract: After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, hundreds of African North Americans returned to fight for the U.S. Army, and thousands more returned to the United States in the decades that followed. At the same time, hundreds of men, women, and children traveled north to Canada, even after emancipation. Time in Canada gave African North Americans the power of comparison: When struggling for access to social and political participation and economic opportunity in the United States, these individuals had a reference point in British North America (Canada), a similar but distinct Anglo-American society with a different history of slavery, emancipation, and claims for equal rights. This paper places African North American political actions, economic choices, and cultural arguments within a transnational context, providing a new understanding of the source of political and cultural currents in U.S. history from the beginnings of the Underground Railroad to the death of the emancipation generation (roughly 1830-1920), expanding the geographic scope of Reconstruction and of African American history northward. It outlines the importance of the idea as well as the reality of Canada for these African North Americans, and then considers why the aftermath of the well-known Underground Railroad history has received so little attention.
Date: 10/22/2016
Primary URL: https://westernhistoryassociation.wildapricot.org/resources/Pictures/SEPT%2022%20FINAL%20VERSION%20OF%20ST%20PAUL%20PROGRAM.pdf
Primary URL Description: program from conference
Conference Name: Western History Association


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