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Products for Grant FB-57108-13

FB-57108-13
The Mediterranean in the Islamic Cartographic Imagination
Karen Pinto, Gettysburg College

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-57108-13

Medieval Islamic Maps: An Exploration (Book)
Title: Medieval Islamic Maps: An Exploration
Author: Karen C. Pinto
Abstract: Hundreds of exceptional cartographic images are scattered throughout medieval and early modern Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscript collections. The plethora of copies created around the Islamic world over the course of eight centuries testifies to the enduring importance of these medieval visions for the Muslim cartographic imagination. With Medieval Islamic Maps, historian Karen C. Pinto brings us the first in-depth exploration of medieval Islamic cartography from the mid-tenth to the nineteenth century. Pinto focuses on the distinct tradition of maps known collectively as the Book of Roads and Kingdoms (Kitab al-Masalik wa al-Mamalik, or KMMS), examining them from three distinct angles—iconography, context, and patronage. She untangles the history of the KMMS maps, traces their inception and evolution, and analyzes them to reveal the identities of their creators, painters, and patrons, as well as the vivid realities of the social and physical world they depicted. In doing so, Pinto develops innovative techniques for approaching the visual record of Islamic history, explores how medieval Muslims perceived themselves and their world, and brings Middle Eastern maps into the forefront of the study of the history of cartography.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo17703325.html
Primary URL Description: This is a link to the hard copy that will be published in September. I will send a copy to the NEH as soon as copies are available.
Secondary URL: https://cdcshoppingcart.uchicago.edu/Cart/ChicagoBook.aspx?ISBN=9780226126968&PRESS=CHICAGO
Secondary URL Description: Link to epub which is available for rental or purchase download prior to the publication of the hard cover
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780226126968
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

Masking Conflict with Harmony: The Two Faces of the KMMS Mediterranean Map (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Masking Conflict with Harmony: The Two Faces of the KMMS Mediterranean Map
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: This paper is based on selections from my forthcoming book on “The Mediterranean in the Islamic Cartographic Imagination,” which focuses on the Mediterranean maps that illustrate manuscript copies of al-I??akhri's Kitab al-masalik wa-al-mamalik (Book of Routes and Realms), abbreviated to KMMS. The reason for my focus on the KMMS tradition is that I aim to understand the most popular and widespread medieval Islamic mapping tradition. While there are other examples of Islamic mapping most of these are singleton traditions with limited copies whereas there are in excess of thirty cartographically illustrated copies of al-I??akhri’s map manuscript extant. Their number make them by far the most commonly replicated cartographic image in the central lands of the medieval and early modern Islamic world and therefore useful for deconstruction if we want to understand what kind of information on the Mediterranean was communicated to people who were exposed to these images.
Date: 3/4/2016
Conference Name: Mediterranean Seminar Winter 2016 Workshop, Harvard University

Islamo-Christian Cartographic Connections (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Islamo-Christian Cartographic Connections
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: Did medieval European maps influence the Islamic ones or vice versa? Or were they mutually exclusive? The question of Islamo-Christian cartographic connections is one of the major unresolved debates in the history of cartography. Scholars fall on both sides of the divide. A definitive answer to the question has been hampered by the lack of extant examples demonstrating Islamo-Christian cartographic connections. In this paper I discuss in depth a medieval European T- O map labeled in Arabic.
Date: 10/11/2015
Conference Name: “Islamo-Christian Cartographic Connections,” at the “Found in Translation,” conference on the world history of science, 1200 to 1600 CE, University of Pittsburgh

Qustantiniyya (Constantinople) on Islamic Maps: Depictions & Impact (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Qustantiniyya (Constantinople) on Islamic Maps: Depictions & Impact
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: Every medieval Islamic Mediterranean map of the Kitab al-Masalik wa al-Mamlik (KKMS) tradition displays Qustantiniyya proudly astride the Bosphorus. These depictions vary with time, place, and milieu of copy. This talk will discuss the depiction of Constantinople and, by extension, Anatolia, in particular the thughur (the most heavily contested of all Christian-Muslim frontiers), which was the center of a six-century struggle for control between the Byzantine and Abbasid Empires that was eventually won by the Turkic tribes. I will show how the Anatolian thughur, in fact, underlined the classical KMMS map of the Mediterranean. Time permitting I will also discuss the commissioning of a cluster of Ottoman copies for Fatih's new post-conquest mosque libraries.
Date: 5/21/2016
Primary URL: http://http://www.osmanliistanbulu.org/en/
Conference Name: The Fourth International Conference on Ottoman Istanbul at Istanbul 29 Mayis Üniversitesi

Liminal Spaces: Places and Borders of the Great Thughur and 'Awasim of Southeastern Anatolia (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Liminal Spaces: Places and Borders of the Great Thughur and 'Awasim of Southeastern Anatolia
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: For the purposes of this workshop, I plan to focus on a different area of the Mediterranean maps, in particular on the great Thughur and ?Awa?im area of Southeastern Anatolia. It is located in the lower right quadrant of the map running from the three river markers of the Jay?an, Say?an, and Baradan at the bottom (east) of the map to the Bosphorus (Khalij Qus?an?iniya) along the right (northern) flank of the map. (See template of Fig. 2; blue arrows indicate area of discussion) It spans in other words the region we refer to now as Anatolia, Asia Minor of yore, or rather a portion of it. That portion of coastal southeastern Turkey that borders on northern Syria and was an area of deep and sustained contestation between the Eastern Christian and Islamic worlds for the better part of six centuries.
Date: 05/18/2015
Primary URL: http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/europeanstudies/medcrossings
Conference Name: Mediterranean Crossings, Yale University

Mapping the Medieval World in Islamic Cartography (Radio/Audio Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Mapping the Medieval World in Islamic Cartography
Writer: Karen Pinto
Director: Nir Shafir
Producer: Chris Gratien
Abstract: Hundreds of cartographic images of the world and its regions exist scattered throughout collections of medieval and early modern Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts. The sheer number of these extant maps tells us that from the thirteenth century onward, when these map-manuscripts began to proliferate, visually depicting the world became a major preoccupation of medieval Muslim scholars. However, these cartographers did not strive for mimesis, that is, representation or imitation of the real world. These schematic, geometric, and often symmetrical images of the world are iconographic representations—‘carto-ideographs’—of how medieval Muslim cartographic artists and their patrons perceived their world and chose to represent and disseminate this perception. In this podcast, we sit down with Karen Pinto to discuss the maps found in the cartographically illustrated Kitab al-Masalik wa-al-Mamalik (Book of Routes and Realms) tradition, which is the first known geographic atlas of maps, its influence on Ottoman cartography, and how basic versions of these carto-ideographs were transported back to villages and far-flung areas of the Islamic empire.
Date: 01/12/2016
Primary URL: http://http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2016/01/islamic-cartography.html
Access Model: OA
Format: Web

MIME and Other Digital Experimentations with Medieval Islamic Maps (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: MIME and Other Digital Experimentations with Medieval Islamic Maps
Writer: Karen Pinto
Director: Digital Islamic Humanities, Brown University
Producer: Elias Muhanna
Abstract: I have spent the last two decades studying medieval and early modern Islamic maps in depth. These studies involved extensive on-site visits to manuscript libraries through which I collected thousands of images of medieval Islamic maps ranging in date from the eleventh century to the nineteenth. The sheer number of these extant maps tells us, at least from the thirteenth century onwards when copies of these map-manuscripts begin to proliferate, that the world was a much-depicted place. It loomed large in the medieval Muslim imagination. It was pondered, discussed, and copied with minor and major variations again and again, and all with what seems to be a peculiar idiosyncrasy to modern eyes: the cartographers did not strive for mimesis (imitation of the real world). They did not show irregular coastlines even though some of the geographers whose work includes these maps openly acknowledge that the landmasses and their coastlines are uneven. They present instead a deliberately schematic layout of the world and the regions that comprised the Islamic empire that can be best described as “carto-ideographs.” I started a digital project called MIME—Medieval Islamic Maps Encyclopedia—to place these maps on an interactive CD and online web-based format in order to make this rich resource available to scholars, students, and the general public. The mainstay of MIME are the maps found in the manuscripts of al-I??akhri, Ibn ?awqal, and al-Muqaddasi—also known as the “Islamic Atlas.” The aim of MIME is to decode the place and space matrix on these carto-ideographs so that anyone, with or without Arabic, can browse them and understand how medieval Muslim cartographic artists and their patrons perceived their world.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://islamichumanities.org/conference-2015/
Primary URL Description: Scroll down to Session 3
Secondary URL: http://youtu.be/rkZe3galDUY
Secondary URL Description: Youtube link
Access Model: OA
Format: Video
Format: Web

Sicily: Lynchpin of Medieval Islamic Maps of the Mediterranean (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Sicily: Lynchpin of Medieval Islamic Maps of the Mediterranean
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: In this paper I discuss the crucial role that Sicily plays as the lynchpin of medieval Islamic maps of the Mediterranean. I have spent the last two decades studying medieval Islamic maps in depth, in particular KMMS maps produced in the Kitab al-Masalik wa-al-Mamalik (Routes and Kingdoms) geographical manuscripts from the tenth century onwards. The maps of the Mediterranean, subject of my next book, consistently place Sicily at the center of their maps suggesting that the Muslims saw it as the central lynchpin of the Mediterranean around which the entire map was built. The question that I will explore in this paper is why Sicily is consistently placed as the central point of the medieval Islamic depiction of the Mediterranean. Out of this inquiry emerges the crucial discovery that some copies of this KMMS Mediterranean map were produced under the auspices of Norman rulership in the twelfth century Sicily.
Date: 5/28/2016
Primary URL: https://www.mediterraneanstudies.org/ms/general_information_2016.html
Primary URL Description: Conference program
Conference Name: 19th Annual Mediterranean Studies Congress, Mediterranean Studies Association

Is there a Medieval Muslim Mediterranean? (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Is there a Medieval Muslim Mediterranean?
Author: test
Author: Karen Pinto and Karla Mallette
Abstract: tba Middle East Studies Association (MESA) 2015 Annual Meeting, Denver, Nov. 22, 2015
Date: 11/22/2016
Conference Name: Middle East Studies Association (MESA) 2015 Annual Meeting

Was there an Islamo-Mediterranean Culture & When? (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Was there an Islamo-Mediterranean Culture & When?
Author: Karen Pinto
Author: Brian Catlos
Abstract: Given all the work that has been done on the subject in the last decade, that there was an Islamo-Mediterranean culture is undeniable. To mention but a few examples because there are too many to mention. See, for instance, the work of Brian Catlos, Karla Mallette, Sarah Secord-Davis, Jessica Goldberg, Olivia Remie Constable, and other participants of this workshop. What all this research has proven in agreement with Braudel, Goitein, and the other yea-saying scholars of yore is that they were right to see the Mediterranean as a region of intense cultural encounters religious, architectural, textual, mythological, navigational and otherwise. From tinkers, tailors, soldiers, sailors, traders, travelers, pilgrims, crusaders, and other folk, we hear story upon story of one Mediterranean Encounter after another.
Date Range: MEH/MED Middle East History/Mediterranean, The Mediterranean Seminar, Boulder, Colorado

Islamic Ways of Seeing the World (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Islamic Ways of Seeing the World
Author: Karen Pinto
Abstract: Islamic Ways of Seeing the World" ( Schematic, geometric, and often symmetrical images are the hallmark of the medieval Islamic conception of a world that loomed large in their imagination for seven centuries.)
Date: 3/15/2015
Conference Name: "Medieval Global Cartographies,” at Medieval Academy of America (MAA) Meeting, Notre Dame


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