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Products for Grant FB-57824-14

FB-57824-14
Transformations in Race Relations and the Creation of Ethnic Identity in 18th-Century Ecuador
Rachel Corr, Florida Atlantic University, John D. MacArthur Campus

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-57824-14

Ritual, rumores y rebelion en Pelileo en el siglo XVIII (Article)
Title: Ritual, rumores y rebelion en Pelileo en el siglo XVIII
Author: Rachel Corr
Abstract: In this article, based on a reading of colonial documents available in the Archivo Nacional del Ecuador that I undertook between 2008-14, I analyze a case from 1768 in Pelileo (Audiencia de Quito) in which, after a rebellion in the sweatshop of San Ildefonso, the cacique of the Guamabalo was accused of planning a general uprising against Spaniards and mestizos during the fiesta of Corpus Christi. The accusations were based on various factors that were characteristics of this period: colonial suspicions of caciques and doubts about their loyalty to the Crown; the intermediary position of mestizos with respect to Spaniards and indigenous people; and the danger of rebellion that is always present in fiestas. Using theories from anthropology and history I analyze the rmors of rebellion in the specific socio-historical context of eighteenth century Pelileo and the growing tensions in interethnic relations.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://www.ucuenca.edu.ec/ojs/index.php/pucara
Access Model: available for purchase
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Pucara: Revista de Humanidades
Publisher: Universidad de Cuenca

Voces y silencios en testmonios indigenas de 1661 sobre el obraje de San Ildefonso. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Voces y silencios en testmonios indigenas de 1661 sobre el obraje de San Ildefonso.
Author: Rachel Corr
Abstract: La investigación de agravios a los indígenas de Pelileo en 1661 resultó en un documento detallado de testimonios sobre los abusos que ellos sufrieron en el obraje de San Ildefonso. En esta ponencia analizo estos testimonios con la intención de entender la situación de indígenas de dos posiciones sociales diferentes: los intermediarios indígenas, y los forasteros, quienes carecían de una red de parentesco en Pelileo. No solo considero las voces, sino también los “silencios” en el documento, el que no se provee conocimiento sobre los forasteros ni testimonios de los esclavos Africanos, quienes fueron actores importantes en los acontecimientos que tuvieron lugar en San Ildefonso reportados en 1661.
Date: 08/26/2015
Conference Name: III Congreso Latinoamericano y Caribeño de Ciencias Sociales FLACSO, Quito, August 26-28, 2015

Indigenous Wet-Nurses for African Slave Babies: Hidden Racial Histories of Ecuador's Blue City (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Indigenous Wet-Nurses for African Slave Babies: Hidden Racial Histories of Ecuador's Blue City
Author: Rachel Corr
Abstract: While modern day Pelileo is known in Ecuador as the manufacturing center of blue jeans, seventeenth century Pelileo has hidden histories of exploitation related to textile production. The colonial town was inhabited by a multiethnic workforce that served the textile mill of San Ildefonso. Indigenous people, imprisoned and tortured inside the mill, bore the burden of producing the fine, wool textiles. The division of labor, in which African slaves supervised indigenous “volunteers” and indigenous women nursed the babies of slave women, complicated race relations. I discuss how social roles within indigenous families were affected by the exploitation in the mill, with a focus on specific incidents between indigenous people and African slaves. Using testimonies from the criminal case against the mill owner, I shed light on how the contradictory role of wet-nurse was used both as evidence for and against accusations of exploitation.
Date: 11/04/2015
Conference Name: American Society for Ethnohistory

"Were it Not for His Wife He Would Perish": Food and Family in Testimonies of Colonial Andean Mill Workers. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Were it Not for His Wife He Would Perish": Food and Family in Testimonies of Colonial Andean Mill Workers.
Author: Rachel Corr
Abstract: In this paper I analyze the testimonies of seventeenth century indigenous textile mill workers from the Audiencia de Quito, with a focus on food and family relations. Through their testimonies, which were collected in 1661, native workers described how they experienced the oppressive conditions of the mill. Memories of hunger and the struggle of family members to provide for each other became representative of the exploitation of indigenous workers and their families. Food-centered testimonies make quotidian, private, domestic acts public, and have the potential to transform personal experiences into political statements. The declarations of these Andean men and women can be read as testimonios to reveal how personal experiences with hunger, and the production, consumption, and exchange of food were linked to larger historical contexts. The encomienda system, the transatlantic slave trade, and Quito’s dependence on the textile market had particular effects on northern Andean families. Native Andeans’ narration of their experiences shows how the intimate, familiar act of feeding was affected by historical power structures.
Date: 04/01/2016
Conference Name: 63rd Annual Conference of the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies


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