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Products for Grant FB-58325-15

FB-58325-15
The Origin of Black Politics in America, 1790-1860
Van Gosse, Franklin and Marshall College

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FB-58325-15

Fight for black voting rights precedes the Constitution (Article)
Title: Fight for black voting rights precedes the Constitution
Author: Van Gosse
Abstract: na
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2015/03/12/fight-for-black-voting-rights-precedes-constitution/VM0V8vsrIFHXxPb1Qv9kAJ/story.html
Format: Newspaper
Periodical Title: Boston Globe

Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions: African American Politics and U.S. History in the Long 19th Century (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions: African American Politics and U.S. History in the Long 19th Century
Author: Van Gosse
Author: David Waldstreicher
Abstract: A Conference to be held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies of the University of Pennsylvania [February 8-9, 2017] Emancipations, Reconstructions, and Revolutions seeks to gather historians of US politics and African-American life to consider collectively not whether African Americans participated in the politics of the early, ante- and post-bellum republic, but how, when, and with what lasting effects. It will bring together various historiographical revisions now in process, including the recognition that the Civil War and Reconstruction typify rather than divide the middle period of American history. We are on the cusp of a new understanding of our national origins, seeing the American Revolution as a violent civil war shaped in large part by slavery and black participation. The Revolutionary settlement of half-slave and half-free thus defines a first Emancipation and first Reconstruction, part of a single “long” process beginning in the North and culminating in the South. We believe that our understanding of modern African American and U.S. politics will be fruitfully renovated by rethinking prior emancipations and reconstructions, in ways that do not take for granted the nature and outcomes of revolutions that could easily be described as civil wars followed by reconstructions.
Date Range: 2016-2017
Location: Graduate Center of CUNY and McNeil Center of the University of Pennsylvania


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