NEH banner

[light] [dark]

[Return to Query]

Products for grant FEL-257427-18

FEL-257427-18
Unseen Art: Memory, Vision, and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica
Claudia Brittenham, University of Chicago

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FEL-257427-18

Aztec Art and the Fragility of Empire (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Aztec Art and the Fragility of Empire
Abstract: Aztec art drew on the Mesoamerican past, citing works from the ancient cities of Teotihuacan and Tula to lend authority and legitimacy to the new empire. But this engagement with the past also provoked reflection on the inevitable end of empire and the cyclicality of time, themes that resonate as the five hundredth anniversary of the Spanish invasion of Mexico unfolds this year.
Author: Claudia Brittenham
Date: 10/21/1029
Location: Art Institute of Chicago

Imagining a Future Past: Unseen art and Aztec archaism (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Imagining a Future Past: Unseen art and Aztec archaism
Abstract: Many Aztec sculptures were carved on all available surfaces, including their undersides, such that some carvings would be concealed when the sculpture was set in place. This practice raises questions about the meaning of Aztec image-making, the audiences for such concealed works, and how disciplines like art history should incorporate conditions of visibility into the study of ancient objects. Most of the genres of Aztec art with carving on their undersides were archaizing, citing the sculptural traditions of cities like Teotihuacan and Tula, which had been abandoned centuries earlier. In this talk, I consider the links between the Aztec experience of the past and the questions about the visibility of ancient sculpture.
Author: Claudia Brittenham
Date: 9/19/2019
Location: Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies, Cornell University

Radio CIAMS Podcast (Radio/Audio Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Radio CIAMS Podcast
Abstract: RadioCIAMS is a podcast series produced by the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. In this episode, we discussed my work on Maya carved lintels, the challenges of seeing lintels in their original contexts, and the implications for art history and archaeology.
Date: 9/20/19
Primary URL: https://archaeology.cornell.edu/radio-ciams-archive
Primary URL Description: RadioCIAMS Archive
Access Model: Open access
Format: Web

John Lloyd Stephens and the Lost Lintel of Kabah (Article)
Title: John Lloyd Stephens and the Lost Lintel of Kabah
Author: Brittenham, Claudia
Abstract: “John Lloyd Stephens and the Lost Lintel of Kabah,” in Destroyed – Disappeared – Lost – Never Were, edited by Beate Fricke and Aden Kumler. Viewpoints series, co-published by the International Center of Medieval Art and the Penn State University Press. Under review. This essay considers John Lloyd Stephens' removal of a carved wooden lintel from the Maya city of Kabah and its later destruction in fire as a way of thinking about the colonialist legacy of collecting Mesoamerican art in the 19th century.
Year: 2019
Format: Other
Publisher: the International Center of Medieval Art and the Penn State University Press


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=FEL-257427-18