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Products for grant FEL-258065-18

FEL-258065-18
The Influence of Philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) on American Thought and Culture
Claire Arcenas, University of Montana

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FEL-258065-18

Locke as a Negative Exemplar in the Early United States (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Locke as a Negative Exemplar in the Early United States
Author: Claire Rydell Arcenas
Abstract: Today, John Locke’s contributions to American political thought are understood almost entirely in terms of his Second Treatise (1690). Prior to the Cold War, however, Locke influenced Americans in a variety of important, but hitherto underappreciated, ways. In this paper, I address a particularly interesting aspect of Locke’s changing influence: late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century Americans’ preoccupation with his involvement in creating a set of Fundamental Constitutions (1669) for the English colony of Carolina. I show that, against the political backdrop of the early national period, Americans exhumed Locke’s unsuccessful attempt at drafting a constitution for Carolina and interpreted it as a striking example of the perils of governments born of abstraction rather than practical experience.
Date: 01/24/2020
Primary URL: http://www.mceas.org/seminars_friday.shtml#url
Primary URL Description: The McNeil Seminar Schedule
Conference Name: McNeil Center for Early American Studies, Friday Seminar

Why John Locke's Mistakes Mattered in the Early United States (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Why John Locke's Mistakes Mattered in the Early United States
Author: Claire Rydell Arcenas
Abstract: Today, John Locke’s contributions to American political thought are understood almost entirely in terms of his Second Treatise (1690). Prior to the Cold War, however, Locke influenced Americans in a variety of important, but hitherto underappreciated, ways. In this paper, I address a particularly interesting aspect of Locke’s changing influence: late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century Americans’ preoccupation with his involvement in creating a set of Fundamental Constitutions (1669) for the English colony of Carolina. I show that, against the political backdrop of the early national period, Americans exhumed Locke’s unsuccessful attempt at drafting a constitution for Carolina and interpreted it as a striking example of the perils of governments born of abstraction rather than practical experience.
Date: 01/31/2020
Primary URL: http://www.newberry.org/01312020-claire-arcenas-university-montana
Primary URL Description: Newberry Library, American Political Thought Seminar
Conference Name: Newberry Library, American Political Thought Seminar


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