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Products for grant FEL-262343-19

FEL-262343-19
A Biography of Alfred Preis (1911-1993): Immigrant, Architect, and Designer of the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor
Laura McGuire, University of Hawaii

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FEL-262343-19

“Making Modernism Hawaiian: Rebuilding Laupahoehoe School After a Tidal Wave” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Making Modernism Hawaiian: Rebuilding Laupahoehoe School After a Tidal Wave”
Author: Laura McGuire
Abstract: This paper examines the historical significance of the rebuilding of Laupahoehoe School, a Hawai‘i public school on the eastern coastline of Hawai‘i Island. The original school, along with major roads and infrastructure, was destroyed when an enormous tidal wave hit the island in April 1946. The destruction of the school came at a time (just after World War II) when Hawai‘i’s population was growing rapidly, and older buildings were stretched to capacity with wartime children. Alfred Preis, a Jewish refugee architect from Nazi-occupied Vienna was selected to develop the Laupahoehoe design. Until 1946, Pries’s work in Hawai‘i had remained closely wedded to the Austrian modernist form languages he had learned while studying in Vienna; he hadn’t quite absorbed the ways in which design in the tropics could, or should, be different from architecture in temperate Europe. At Laupahoehoe, however, the post-disaster situation – which included impassable roads and serious difficulties importing building materials – forced Preis to improvise and to develop his skills as a tropical, regionalist architect. Preis used locally sourced materials, such as lava rock and ohia trees – a highly significant plant in indigenous tradition – and developed a passive climate control system derived from local wind patterns. He married these materials and techniques to his own Viennese traditions about ornament, and functional and spatial planning, creating a singularly regionalist building. At Laupahoehoe School, Preis thus put forward a new vision of tropical architecture for the islands – one that made modernism Hawaiian.
Date: 12/08/19
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Z5m5iblm_mrnnwmuDBOfG9j81dEmwZCv/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: “Making Modernism Hawaiian: Rebuilding Laupahoehoe School After a Tidal Wave” Conference paper presentation by Laura McGuire
Conference Name: Meeting of the International Network for Tropical Architecture, Brisbane, Australia, Dec. 5-8, 2019

Alfred Preis and Rebuilding Laupahoēhoē School After a Tidal Wave: Making Modernism “Hawaiian” (Article)
Title: Alfred Preis and Rebuilding Laupahoēhoē School After a Tidal Wave: Making Modernism “Hawaiian”
Author: Laura McGuire
Abstract: This forthcoming paper examines the historical significance of the rebuilding of Laupahoehoe School, a Hawai‘i public school on the eastern coastline of Hawai‘i Island. The original school, along with major roads and infrastructure, was destroyed when an enormous tidal wave hit the island in April 1946. The destruction of the school came at a time (just after World War II) when Hawai‘i’s population was growing rapidly, and older buildings were stretched to capacity with wartime children. Alfred Preis, a Jewish refugee architect from Nazi-occupied Vienna was selected to develop the Laupahoehoe design. Until 1946, Pries’s work in Hawai‘i had remained closely wedded to the Austrian modernist form languages he had learned while studying in Vienna; he hadn’t quite absorbed the ways in which design in the tropics could, or should, be different from architecture in temperate Europe. At Laupahoehoe, however, the post-disaster situation – which included impassable roads and serious difficulties importing building materials – forced Preis to improvise and to develop his skills as a tropical, regionalist architect. Preis used locally sourced materials, such as lava rock and ohia trees – a highly significant plant in indigenous tradition – and developed a passive climate control system derived from local wind patterns. He married these materials and techniques to his own Viennese traditions about ornament, and functional and spatial planning, creating a singularly regionalist building. At Laupahoehoe School, Preis thus put forward a new vision of tropical architecture for the islands – one that made modernism Hawaiian.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aVPBcYLySxMk1KDYbEG6ahhgHXKqFC3a/view?usp=sharing
Primary URL Description: "Alfred Preis and Rebuilding Laupahoēhoē School After a Tidal Wave: Making Modernism 'Hawaiian'" By Laura McGuire This is the final draft of my article accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the 2019 Meeting of the International Network for Tropical Architecture. It will be published in Summer 2020.
Access Model: The proceedings will be open access when published
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Proceedings of the 2019 Meeting of the International Network for Tropical Architecture
Publisher: Proceedings of the 2019 International Meeting of the Network for Tropical Architecture

Alfred Preis: Roofing as Motif in Hawaiian Architecture (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Alfred Preis: Roofing as Motif in Hawaiian Architecture
Writer: Laura McGuire
Director: Laura McGuire
Director: Timothy Schuler
Producer: ThinkTech Hawaii
Abstract: Regional Hawaiian Modernism In this episode of Human(e) Architecture, we will be discussing the concept of the roof in Alfred Preis’ mid century architecture and the historical context for his designs, which are based in the Hawaiian hale and Chinese roofs. The host for this episode is Laura McGuire. The guest for this episode is Timothy Schuler.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://thinktechhawaii.com/alfred-preis-roofing-as-motif-in-hawaiian-architecture-humane-architecture/
Primary URL Description: Regional Hawaiian Modernism In this episode of Human(e) Architecture, we will be discussing the concept of the roof in Alfred Preis’ mid century architecture and the historical context for his designs, which are based in the Hawaiian hale and Chinese roofs. The host for this episode is Laura McGuire. The guest for this episode is Timothy Schuler.
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Web

Alfred Preis and the Veteran's Village in Palolo Valley (Docomomo Hawaii) (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Alfred Preis and the Veteran's Village in Palolo Valley (Docomomo Hawaii)
Writer: Laura McGuire
Director: Laura McGuire
Producer: ThinkTech Hawaii
Abstract: This episode of Humane Architecture discusses the Veterans Village housing development designed from 1947-1951 by Alfred Preis and the lessons that cooperative housing projects may have for our current Hawaii housing crisis today.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOwB3HBXuU8
Primary URL Description: This episode of Humane Architecture discusses the Veterans Village housing development designed from 1947-1951 by Alfred Preis and the lessons that cooperative housing projects may have for our current Hawaii housing crisis today.
Access Model: Open access
Format: Web


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