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Products for grant FEL-262948-19

FEL-262948-19
Objects of Memory: The Medieval Art Historical Imagination
Erik Inglis, Oberlin College

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FEL-262948-19

History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in European Church Collections, c. 800-1300 (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: History in the Making: Categories, Techniques and Chronology in European Church Collections, c. 800-1300
Author: Erik Inglis
Abstract: I assessed how medieval people's understanding of the history of techniques enabled them to date ancient sarcophagi, metalwork, and manuscripts, and then explained how this historical knowledge affected the reception and use of old objects.
Date: 9/13/2019
Primary URL: https://medievalarchive2019.wordpress.com/
Primary URL Description: webpage for conference: “Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages,” University of St Andrews, September 13 - 14, 2019
Conference Name: Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages

The Later Medieval Reception of Earlier Medieval Manuscripts (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Later Medieval Reception of Earlier Medieval Manuscripts
Author: Erik Inglis
Abstract: Analyzed the reception of old books in the Middle Ages, showing how art historical knowledge about them enabled them to serve as powerful ties to institutional and religious history.
Date: 1/22/2020
Primary URL: https://arthistory.yale.edu/event/medieval-renaissance-forum-erik-inglis-oberlin
Primary URL Description: link to online poster for talk
Conference Name: Yale Medieval Renaissance Forum

’It Began with a Picture,’ or, Inventing Stories to Make Sense of Images in the European Middle Ages (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: ’It Began with a Picture,’ or, Inventing Stories to Make Sense of Images in the European Middle Ages
Author: Erik Inglis
Abstract: This paper examines medieval discussions of iconography, what an image represents. It concentrates on what Dale Kinney has called narrative etiologies, that is cases where medieval viewers, provoked by an image they did not understand, invent a story that explains it. My examples include the contested reception of ruler portraits, inquiries into images in churches, and narrative elaborations on hagiographical images. These cases demonstrate that medieval viewers were quite happy to accept Pope Gregory the Great's invitation to read images as the literate read texts. For the art historian, they offer gratifying proof that images may provoke verbal narratives instead of merely depending on them.
Date: 9/30/2019
Primary URL: https://lsa.umich.edu/histartvrc/news-events/all-events.detail.html/65742-16651985.html
Primary URL Description: website poster for talk
Conference Name: Medieval and Early Modern Studies Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor


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