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Products for Grant FT-229420-15

FT-229420-15
Ancient Greek Philosophers on Trade, Business and Money
Etienne Helmer, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-229420-15

D'une réciprocité l'autre: la specialisation des métiers et des fonctions comme principe d'unité politique dans la République de Platon (Article)
Title: D'une réciprocité l'autre: la specialisation des métiers et des fonctions comme principe d'unité politique dans la République de Platon
Author: Etienne Helmer
Abstract: Both Aristotle and Plato consider the economic exchange as one of the most basic social link. According to Aristotle though, the individual specialization of the tasks and functions Socrates advocates in the Republic in order to integrate these economic exchange into a political order, leads to the division of the city instead of unifying it. This article argues, on the contrary, that the city of the Republic owes its unity to the specialization of the tasks and functions. Far from being divisive, this principle adds a positive political reciprocity to the ambivalent and negative reciprocity Plato sees at work at the level of the economic exchange.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://periodicos.unb.br/index.php/archai/issue/view/1238/showToc
Access Model: open access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Archai: On the Origins of the Western Thought
Publisher: Archai: On the Origins of the Western Thought

Platon et Aristote ou les pouvoirs politiques de la monnaie (Article)
Title: Platon et Aristote ou les pouvoirs politiques de la monnaie
Author: Etienne Helmer
Abstract: Plato and Aristotle, or the Political Power of Money Through close examination of texts by Plato and Aristotle, this article discusses the effects that money can have on the polis. For these philosophers, the function of money is not merely paying the price of things but also circulating justice and harmony throughout the polis. Plato makes money a factor of proportion that can be conducive to civic friendship, while Aristotle makes it the instrument of measure that makes the reciprocity through which true political community can be maintained possible. On the other hand, money is also understood as carrying the risk of injustice. Under the form of excessive prices, it can be a threat to the harmony and reciprocity that are necessary to the polis. Plato and Aristotle thus show under what conditions commercial trade can serve a legitimate political purpose, and how money is both the symbol and the instrument of such a purpose.
Year: 2015
Access Model: Subscription only
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Revue du MAUSS
Publisher: La Decouverte


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