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FT-264476-19
Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union
Frederick White, Utah Valley University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-264476-19

Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union
Abstract: Welcome to a special talk by Dr. Frederick H. White, Professor of Russian and Integrated Studies at Utah Valley University. Influenced by the theories of Pierre Bourdieu and Pascale Casanova, this lecture explores the role of the scholar and translator in consecrating the work of Ernest Hemingway for the Soviet literary market. Ivan Kashkin (1899-1963) was the leading translator of the American writer’s work into Russian, including a two-volume edition of selected works in 1959, and the author of the influential critical-biography, Ernest Hemingway, published in Moscow in 1966. Translation is a crucial element in the attainment of literary capital beyond the author’s national borders, therefore Kashkin’s publications legitimized Hemingway’s literary works within the Soviet Union as early as 1934. This lecture will concentrate on Hemingway’s introduction to the Soviet market in the 1930s; his exclusion from it due to the novel For Whom the Bell Tolls; Kashkin’s “re-reading” of Hemingway in the 1950s, and publication of his Soviet biography in 1971. Speaker’s bio: Dr. Frederick H. White is Professor of Russian and Integrated Studies at Utah Valley University. He has published six books and over thirty academic articles on Russian literature, film and culture. He is one of the leading specialists on the writer Leonid Andreev and has published in the areas of Russian Modernism, psychology and literature in the Russian fin de siècle, the economics of culture and post-Soviet cinema. Recently, he has published a book of memoirs, interviews, scholarly essays and biographical documents that relate to the recently deceased filmmaker Aleksei Balabanov. At present, he is working on a book provisionally titled Hemingway in the Soviet Union, which concentrates on the efforts made by Soviet literary agents to interest the American author in the Soviet experiment. #talk #culture #literature
Author: Frederick H. White
Date: 06/21/2019
Location: The American Center, Moscow Russia
Primary URL: http://https://amc.timepad.ru/event/995896/?fbclid=IwAR1yvcKPhdCOP1pUT_JkQ7p4XrNwypIpFdS--fDsPvzhB9mr2bIXoltLUXE

Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union
Abstract: Come learn about Ernest Hemingway's introduction to the Soviet market in the 1930s and his exclusion from it due to the novel "For Whom the Bell Tolls." With special guest speaker Dr Frederick H. White.
Author: Frederick H. White
Date: 08/04/2019
Location: Utah Students Studying Russian, University of Utah
Primary URL Description: I have a copy of the digital poster used to advertise the event. This was sponsored by the student association at the University of Utah and no longer has a live link.

Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Ernest Hemingway in the Soviet Union
Abstract: This lecture explores the role of the scholar and translator in consecrating Ernest Hemingway for the Soviet literary market. Ivan Kashkin (1899-1963) was the leading translator of the American writer’s work into Russian, as early as 1934, and published a two-volume edition of selected works in 1959. Specific attention will be given to Hemingway’s introduction to the Soviet market in the 1930s; his exclusion from it after 1940 due to the novel For Whom the Bell Tolls; Kashkin’s “re-reading” of Hemingway in the 1950s, and publication of the American author’s Soviet biography in 1971.
Author: Frederick H. White
Date: 01/30/2020
Location: Roots of Knowledge Speaker Series, Fulton Library, Utah Valley University
Primary URL: https://www.uvu.edu/rootsofknowledge/events.html
Primary URL Description: This is the "events" website. I have the digital poster for the event if you would like a copy of this.

The Most Outstanding Work of an Idealistic Tendency: Hemingway, Pasternak and the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Most Outstanding Work of an Idealistic Tendency: Hemingway, Pasternak and the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature
Author: Frederick H. White
Abstract: Soon after Ernest Hemingway won the Nobel Prize, his works returned to the Soviet literary market. However, cultural relations between the United States and the USSR were disrupted when Boris Pasternak was selected for the prize in 1958. This article examines Hemingway’s reaction to Pasternak’s refusal of the prize, as well as his understanding of Giangiacomo Feltrinelli’s role in the publication of Doctor Zhivago abroad. In so doing, the precarious position of the author will be highlighted in order to demonstrate that while Hemingway became an iconic figure in the USSR, Pasternak was simultaneously denied similar accolades for his cultural production.
Date: 04/25/2019
Primary URL: http://rggu.com/
Primary URL Description: Keynote address, “The Most Outstanding Work of an Idealistic Tendency: Hemingway, Pasternak and the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature,” Humanities+ 2019, The Russian-American Academic Center at the Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia, 25-26 April 2019.
Conference Name: Humanities+ 2019, The Russian-American Academic Center at the Russian State University for the Humanities

A Soviet Biography for Ernest Hemingway (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: A Soviet Biography for Ernest Hemingway
Author: Frederick H. White
Abstract: Ernest Hemingway’s inclusion among the heroes of the Soviet Union is meaningful beyond the author’s own world-wide fame. Symbolically, it was the moment when the most-American of authors gained a Soviet biography; when Hemingway was fully and completely co-opted into the Soviet literary space. Understanding that Hemingway would not achieve political consciousness in the Socialist Realist sense, Gribanov positioned his subject as an independent writer and journalist dedicated to telling the truth, often to the detriment of his personal and professional relationships. This interpretation was original given preceding Soviet interpretation of the American author and his works. It was also somewhat risky within the context of the trial of the writers Andrei Siniavskii and Yulii Daniel. In this paper, I will argue that with such an approach, Gribanov positioned the author as an independent truth-teller, in the face of political ideologies and repressive governments, appealing to avid readers of Hemingway as well as to a Soviet readership taught to read between the lines.
Date: 11/24/2019
Primary URL: https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/aseees/aseees19/index.php?click_key=1&obf_var=2770967&PHPSESSID=a4h2ne3tra9p89r5g7gvid0qo4
Primary URL Description: “A Soviet Biography for Ernest Hemingway,” Soviet Interpretations of Western Culture, ASEEES, San Francisco, CA, 23-26 November 2019.
Conference Name: ASSOCIATION FOR SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES

Soviet Critics’ Response to Ernest Hemingway’s Emerging Social Consciousness (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Soviet Critics’ Response to Ernest Hemingway’s Emerging Social Consciousness
Author: Frederick H. White
Abstract: Between 1936 and 1939 Ernest Hemingway began to display a political commitment that made him attractive to left-leaning American critics and to Soviet cultural merchants. His former contempt for any ideology and a willingness to expose the sham made his public image even more salient once he became an outspoken antifascist. Hemingway’s departure for Spain as a news correspondent to cover the Spanish Civil War was praised in the Soviet Union, where there was some anticipation that the author would move beyond the pessimism, skepticism and individualism that had been noted in his early literary works. “The Chauffeurs of Madrid” appeared in the journal Abroad (Za rubezhom) on 25 June 1937. The novel To Have and Have Not was published in October 1937 and a Russian translation soon followed in International Literature (Internatsional’naia literatura) with a tentatively positive response from Soviet critics. A portion of his film script, The Spanish Earth, was published in the newspaper Izvestiia on 29 December 1937. The entire film script was published in International Literature in 1938. Yet, it was Hemingway’s play, The Fifth Column that was met with unanimous enthusiasm. It was translated into Russian and published in the first number of International Literature for 1939. This paper will examine in some detail Hemingway’s emerging social consciousness and the positive response of his Soviet critics that validated their earlier efforts to co-opt the American author for the Soviet experiment.
Date: 02/08/2020
Primary URL: https://www.aatseel.org/cfp_program_2020
Primary URL Description: “Soviet Critics’ Response to Ernest Hemingway’s Emerging Social Consciousness,” In 1937: Exile and Foreign Authors in Distant Lands, AATSEEL, San Diego, CA, 6-9 February 2020.
Conference Name: AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF SLAVIC AND EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES

The Most Outstanding Work of an Idealistic Tendency: Hemingway, Pasternak, and the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature (Article)
Title: The Most Outstanding Work of an Idealistic Tendency: Hemingway, Pasternak, and the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature
Author: Frederick H. White
Abstract: Soon after Ernest Hemingway won the Nobel Prize, his works returned to the Soviet literary market. However, cultural relations between the United States and the USSR were disrupted when Boris Pasternak was selected for the prize in 1958. This article examines Hemingway’s reaction to Pasternak’s refusal of the prize, as well as his understanding of Giangiacomo Feltrinelli’s role in the publication of Doctor Zhivago abroad. It also explores the precarious position of authors in literary markets by examining how Hemingway became an iconic figure in the USSR, while Pasternak was simultaneously denied similar accolades for his work.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.hemingwaysociety.org/hemingway-review
Primary URL Description: The Hemingway Review is the publication of the Hemingway Society
Secondary URL: https://muse.jhu.edu/journal/275
Secondary URL Description: You can access the journal through Project Muse
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: The Hemingway Review, vol 40, no. 1 (Fall 2020): 10-28

Hemingway and the Spanish Civil War (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Hemingway and the Spanish Civil War
Author: Frederick H. White
Abstract: Ernest Hemingway reached the height of his literary popularity within the Soviet Union during the Spanish Civil war. His literary works and war correspondence of this period were almost immediately translated into Russian and published in Soviet periodicals. Unlike the American Hemingway who was most often associated for western readers with 1920s Paris, bullfighting, and African safaris. The Soviet Hemingway was an ardent anti-fascist and supporter of Republican Spain. After all, this was the Spain of Mikhail Kol’tsov’s Spanish Diary and the final romantic period of the world revolution, before Stalin’s Great Terror could completely dampen that spirit. In this paper, I will elucidate the Soviet fascination with Hemingway during the period 1936-1940, when Hemingway seemed to experience his political awakening, seemed to move to the left and seemed to identify with the Communists as the only ones who could bring order to Republican Spain.
Date: 11/05/2020
Primary URL: https://sosso.secure-platform.com/api/aseees2020.secure-platform.com/LoginPrompt?returnUrl=https%3a%2f%2faseees2020.secure-platform.com%2fa%2faccount%2fvalidatethirdpartycorporateauthresult%3fredirectUrl%3d%252Fa%252Fgallery%252Frounds%252F3%252Fschedule%
Primary URL Description: This year the American Association of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies held its national convention on-line. This paper was part of a panel titled: Foreigners in the Soviet Union How do people communicate across cultures? In the Soviet Union the exchange of culture with the West was often fraught, especially when deciding who to acknowledge for the Soviet literary market. Soviet translators, scholars and critics were often the arbiters of which authors seemed to support Soviet policy. The papers in this panel proposal explore various aspects of this process of cultural selection.
Secondary URL: https://www.aseees.org/convention
Secondary URL Description: Organization website
Conference Name: American Association of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, annual national convention


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