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Products for Grant FT-51453-03

FT-51453-03
Domestic Judaism Goes Public: A Social History of American Hanukkah
Dianne Ashton, Rowan University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-51453-03

"Quick to the PArty: Southern Jews and the Americanization of Hanukkah" (Article)
Title: "Quick to the PArty: Southern Jews and the Americanization of Hanukkah"
Author: Dianne Ashton
Abstract: Southern Jews have been instrumental in creating unique activities that expanded customs associated with Hanukkah and fit the holiday into the American holiday season.
Year: 2009
Periodical Title: Southern Jewish History, v.12, 2009
Publisher: Southern Jewish Historical Society

"Modern Maccabees: Remaking Hanukkah in Nineteenth Century America" (Article)
Title: "Modern Maccabees: Remaking Hanukkah in Nineteenth Century America"
Author: Dianne Ashton
Abstract: In their debates over the direction Judaism might take in America, nineteenth century rabbis styled themselves Maccabees for the modern era. Some claimed to be like Maccabees because they defended tradition against foreign influence, while others claimed that mantle for reforming Judaism for a new age.
Year: 2010
Format: Other
Periodical Title: New Essays in American Jewish History
Publisher: KTAV Press

"Quick to the Party: Southern Jews and the Americanization of Hanukkah" (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: "Quick to the Party: Southern Jews and the Americanization of Hanukkah"
Writer: Dianne Ashton
Abstract: Southern Jews played important roles in transforming Hanukkah into a holiday suited to the American December holiday season.
Year: 2008
Primary URL: http://www.loc.gov
Primary URL Description: lecture given at Library of Congress
Format: Web

"Quick to the Party: The Americanization of Hanukkah" (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: "Quick to the Party: The Americanization of Hanukkah"
Abstract: Hanukkah's transformation into one of the most popular Jewish holidays in America began in the nineteenth century, with new hymns for adults, new synagogue-based festivals for children, and debates about Judaism's future among rabbis. Twentieth century additions to the holiday included added concerts, plays, and public events that expressed worries about Judaism's future in America.
Author: Dianne Ashton
Date: 12/15/2005
Location: Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut


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