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Products for Grant FT-53445-05

FT-53445-05
George Jardine: Champion of the Democratic Intellect in the Scottish Enlightenment
Lynee Gaillet, Georgia State University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-53445-05

"Writing in the Disciplines: America's Assimilation of the Work of Scottish 'Pedagogic' George Jardine." (Article)
Title: "Writing in the Disciplines: America's Assimilation of the Work of Scottish 'Pedagogic' George Jardine."
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: Scholars David Russell, Robert Connors, and Charles Bazerman, among others, trace the history of the American WAC movement and programs to two initiatives of the 1960s: the renewed interest of American scholars in the study of rhetorical history and composition pedagogy and British educational reform spearheaded by James Britton (and other educators) at the London College of Education—disseminated in the US at the 1966 Dartmouth Conference (see Bazerman, et. al.). In “History of the WAC Movement,” Bazerman et. al. outline the trajectory of this movement, beginning with early twentieth-century American educators’ displeasure with stand-alone composition courses. This history is recognized as the birth of WAC in the US; however, in this essay, I wish to offer another—much earlier—chapter in the developing story of WAC’s history in the US, one that dates back as far as eighteenth-century Glasgow, Scotland.
Year: 2009
Primary URL: http://wac.colostate.edu/journal/vol20/gaillet.pdf
Primary URL Description: Print journal's online presence
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Writing Across the Curriculum Journal

“A Socially Constructed View of Reading and Writing: Historical Alternatives to “Bridging the Gap.” (Article)
Title: “A Socially Constructed View of Reading and Writing: Historical Alternatives to “Bridging the Gap.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: A review of historical educational models outside traditional English departments reveals teaching plans based on the holistic integration of many areas of study now typically falling within the domain of English Studies. For example, George Jardine, eighteenth-century Scottish academician, forged a unique model of language studies in his Logic and Philosophy classes at the University of Glasgow by rejecting traditional theories of higher education and instead attending to student needs. Examining the contributions of academic predecessors like Jardine will reveal how the goals of civic humanism, belletristic appreciation and analysis, and the acquisition of writing skills share a symbiotic relationship within English studies.
Year: 2009
Primary URL: http://www.parlorpress.com/transforming
Primary URL Description: Publisher's website, references Gaillet's chapter in the collection.
Access Model: Print. Book Chapter
Format: Other
Publisher: Parlor Press

“The Role of Literary Contests in Eighteenth-Century Scottish Rhetorical Education.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “The Role of Literary Contests in Eighteenth-Century Scottish Rhetorical Education.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scotland, writing contests reigned supreme. They were an avenue within the university system for motivating students and regulating university curriculum—an important concern during the enlightenment period as the major Scottish Universities were moving away from Scholasticism in attempts to prepare their students for a widening range of careers—both in Scottish cites and to the south, in London. As City Comp attests, urban educational concerns often bridge “town and gown,” as was certainly true in Edinburgh and Glasgow Universities, the hotbeds of Scottish enlightenment. In varying degrees both universities were governed in part by town councils, and educational reform was driven by local occupational, economic, and social concerns. Outside the classroom, contests advanced critical thought, helped homogenize language use, and ensured the widespread recognition of competition sponsors’ principles and beliefs. As the Scots struggled over issues of nationalism and conformity, contests called attention to both concerns by bringing recognition to issues of national pride while simultaneously serving to align the Scots with both English and Continental thought and practice. The contests of the period shed light on cultural and educational identification issues of the time, but also provide historical illustrations of contemporary theories connecting composition instruction and production to issues of liminal space and physical place where the boundaries between the classroom, public discourse, business and industry shift and sometimes dissolve.
Date: 02/17/2011
Primary URL: http://www.scsecs.net/scsecs/2011/program.html
Primary URL Description: Conference website. Lists Gaillet's participation
Conference Name: South-Central Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference

“The ‘Princeton School’ Curriculum: College of New Jersey President John Witherspoon and Scottish Rhetorician George Jardine.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “The ‘Princeton School’ Curriculum: College of New Jersey President John Witherspoon and Scottish Rhetorician George Jardine.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: An examination of manuscript holdings in America reveals that Scottish-based educational philosophy often labeled the “Princeton School,” an alternative to Harvard’s vastly influential curriculum, echoes the philosophical theories of Scottish rhetorician George Jardine, Professor of Logic and Philosophy at Glasgow University (1774-1824). Jardine instructed many Scots who later immigrated to North America and held prestigious positions within higher education and religious circles. In particular, the educational practices of Alexander Campbell at Bethany College and James McCosh at Princeton College clearly bear the mark of Scottish philosophy and pedagogy as codified in Jardine’s foundational treatise The Outlines of Philosophical Education (1818, 1825). To demonstrate ways in which Jardine’s rhetorical theory (based on Scottish Common Sense Realism and Baconian scientific induction) served American democratic philosophies of education, I would like today to recount Jardine’s reputation as the spokesperson for the early nineteenth-century Scottish pedagogical system and illuminate his influence within the teaching philosophies of Campbell and McCosh.
Date: 06/06/2010
Conference Name: Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society. Princeton University, NJ.

“Rhetoric, Religion, and Education: Scottish Origins of the American ‘Princeton School’ Curriculum.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Rhetoric, Religion, and Education: Scottish Origins of the American ‘Princeton School’ Curriculum.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: Jardine’s work offers rich insights into eighteenth- and nineteenth-century rhetorical theory and practice, while providing opportunities for present-day research in writing instruction and administration, the rhetoric of science and religion, and political and social rhetoric. The manuscripts held in the Campbell Collection and testimony from the career of Princeton President James McCosh indicate that Jardine’s sphere of influence reached across the Atlantic, but we are just beginning to understand the far-reaching influence of Jardine’s educational philosophies and practices. As yet, we have neither an intellectual biography of Jardine nor a full-length analysis of his teaching plan. I suspect further investigations into Jardine’s body of work will reveal that he not only codified Scotland’s educational plan but also contributed to the nation’s rhetorical theory, seen particularly in his conception of epistemic writing instruction and assessment, and his philosophies concerning student learning. Certainly these aspects of Jardine’s rhetorical theory were appealing to Alexander Campbell and James McCosh, visible in these American educator’s emphasis on student responsibility, focus on individual student judgment, and reliance on written compositions as a means of self-improvement and knowledge acquisition.
Date: 04/03/2008
Primary URL Description: Jardine’s work offers rich insights into eighteenth- and nineteenth-century rhetorical theory and practice, while providing opportunities for present-day research in writing instruction and administration, the rhetoric of science and religion, and political and social rhetoric. The manuscripts held in the Campbell Collection and testimony from the career of Princeton President James McCosh indicate that Jardine’s sphere of influence reached across the Atlantic, but we are just beginning to understand the far-reaching influence of Jardine’s educational philosophies and practices.
Conference Name: Conference on College Composition and Communication. New Orleans, LA.

“Scottish Foundations of American Theology and Philosophy Education.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Scottish Foundations of American Theology and Philosophy Education.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: As my study of George Jardine now has led me to a study of religion and philosophy in my pursuit of investigating Jardine’s influence in North America, I feel I am only now after 18 years of study, ¬¬presentations and publications getting at the heart of Jardine’s contributions to pedagogy and ultimately what I think is his rhetorical theory—epistemic writing. Questions from the philosophers at this conference also open other avenues of Jardine study that I must follow and include—namely Jardine’s instruction in philosophy. I am the researcher and pupil of an influential, yes, but also impressive predecessor. One who continues to engage my attention as a supreme teacher and administrator, but also as an intellectually compassionate rhetorician who took the time to fully understand his students and fellow teachers’ needs –at the expense of self-promotion.
Date: 09/5/2007
Conference Name: International Reid Symposium. Center for the Study of Scottish Philosophy at Princeton University.

“’On the Institution of Prizes’: Essay Contests in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Scotland.” (Article)
Title: “’On the Institution of Prizes’: Essay Contests in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Scotland.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: This essay explores Scottish nationalism and attitudes towards language associated with Scottish Enlightenment.
Year: 2013
Access Model: Chapter in a book
Format: Other
Periodical Title: Contested Writing. Ed. Mary Lamb. Cambridge. 2013: 54-71
Publisher: Cambridge

“Archival Survival: Navigating Historical Research.” (Article)
Title: “Archival Survival: Navigating Historical Research.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: This book chapter details archival research skills.
Year: 2010
Access Model: Book Chapter
Format: Other
Periodical Title: Working in the Archives. Eds. Alexis Ramsey, Barbara L'Eplattenier, Lisa Mastrangelo, and Wendy Sharer. Southern Illinois UP, 2010: 28-39.
Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press

“Interview with an Archivist: Lynée Lewis Gaillet.” (Article)
Title: “Interview with an Archivist: Lynée Lewis Gaillet.”
Author: Interview of Lynee Lewis Gaillet, Conducted by Wade Mahon.
Abstract: Interviewed about experiences researching Scottish Rhetoric.
Year: 2012
Access Model: subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Issues in Writing. 19.1 (2012): 210-230.

Interview. Serendipity in the Archives (Article)
Title: Interview. Serendipity in the Archives
Author: Interview with Gaillet, Conducted by Lori Ostergaard.
Abstract: Gaillet interviewed about her experiences investigating Scottish archives.
Year: 2010
Access Model: chatper in a book
Format: Other
Periodical Title: Working in the Archives. Eds. Alexis Ramsey, Barbara L'Eplattenier, Lisa Mastrangelo, and Wendy Sharer. Southern Illinois UP, 2010: 149-151

“Fortuitous Happenstance”: Serendipity in Archival Research.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Fortuitous Happenstance”: Serendipity in Archival Research.”
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: Discussed the role of serendipity in researching archival documents, use Scottish research as illustration.
Date: 05/28/2016
Conference Name: Rhetoric Society of America Conference. May 2016. Atlanta, GA.

“’I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends’: Scottish Rhetorician George Jardine’s Bid for the Chair of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow.”. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “’I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends’: Scottish Rhetorician George Jardine’s Bid for the Chair of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow.”.
Author: Lynee Lewis Gaillet
Abstract: Discusses Scottish Rhetorician George Jardine's bid for a Profesorship.
Date: 02/20/2013
Conference Name: South Central Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference. February 2013. Austin, TX


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