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Products for Grant FT-59089-11

FT-59089-11
Gift of State: Diplomacy and Dutch Material Culture in the Ottoman Empire in the Early Seventeenth Century
Claudia Swan, Northwestern University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-59089-11

Exotica on the Move: Birds of Paradise in Early Modern Holland (Article)
Title: Exotica on the Move: Birds of Paradise in Early Modern Holland
Author: Claudia Swan
Abstract: Exploring the interpretive potential of a study of exotica as objects on the move, this essay analyses a paradigmatic instance of the copious exotic objects that the Dutch mobilized in the seventeenth century – birds of paradise. Native to Papua New Guinea, these birds were prized throughout Europe for their stunning plumage, rarity, and distant origins. By reconstructing trade and interest in birds of paradise in the Netherlands, this essay describes how these exotic wares were described and evaluated; how they were valued on and off the market; and how the awe that they inspired served political purposes. In early modern Holland, the exotic depended for its value on the coordinates of the market, and also exercised a power beyond market control, entwined with the political aims of the emergent Republic. In ways that this essay delineates, birds of paradise exemplify early modern Dutch exoticism.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ahis.2015.38.issue-4/issuetoc
Secondary URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8365.12171/abstract
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Art History
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Birds of Paradise for the Sultan: Early Seventeenth-Century Dutch-Turkish Encounters and the Uses of Wonder (Article)
Title: Birds of Paradise for the Sultan: Early Seventeenth-Century Dutch-Turkish Encounters and the Uses of Wonder
Author: Claudia Swan
Abstract: This article describes and analyzes the first diplomatic gift presented by the States General of the Netherlands to the Ottoman Sultan Ahmet i in 1612/1613. The extensive and very costly assortment of items was presented to the Sultan in gratitude for capitulations,permitting the Dutch access to Ottoman ports and therefore direct access to trade in the Levant and Mediterranean.This paper describes the diplomatic gift, a long-neglected episode in Dutch material cultural history, and looks in particular at the role that wonder and wonders played in structuring this remarkable encounter between the fledgling Dutch Republic and the Ottoman court.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: https://www.de-zeventiende-eeuw.nl/articles/10.18352/dze.8464/
Secondary URL: https://doaj.org/article/4893dbbf1239469da8bee1e49a57563c
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: De zeventiende eeuw
Publisher: Utrecht University Library


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