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Products for grant FT-62072-14

FT-62072-14
How Machines Came to Speak: Media Technologies and the First Amendment
Jennifer Petersen, University of Virginia

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=FT-62072-14

Regulating Film, Regulating Emotion: The Emotional History of Public Opinion (Article)
Title: Regulating Film, Regulating Emotion: The Emotional History of Public Opinion
Author: Petersen, J.
Abstract: The article argues that the legal about face in 1950s law in which film was granted First Amendment protection was driven in part by a change in the “emotional regimes” of US democracy, or emotions/performances of emotion that are part of legitimate political culture. The legal understanding of how film does or does not contribute to democratic political culture tracks historical shifts in these emotional regimes. In the teens, elites feared the activation of the masses, as crowds, in political uprisings. By 1950, elite fears had turned to passive audiences, “narcotized” masses that might easily be seduced by totalitarian demagogues.
Year: 2016
Access Model: 10.1080/15295036.2016.1225966
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Critical Studies in Media and Communication

How Machines Came to Speak: Media Technologies and Freedom of Speech (Book)
Title: How Machines Came to Speak: Media Technologies and Freedom of Speech
Author: Jennifer Petersen
Abstract: n How Machines Came to Speak Jennifer Petersen constructs a genealogy of how legal conceptions of “speech” have transformed over the last century in response to new media technologies. Drawing on media and legal history, Petersen shows that the legal category of speech has varied considerably, evolving from a narrow category of oratory and print publication to a broad, abstract conception encompassing expressive nonverbal actions, algorithms, and data. She examines a series of pivotal US court cases in which new media technologies—such as phonographs, radio, film, and computer code—were integral to this shift. In judicial decisions ranging from the determination that silent films were not a form of speech to the expansion of speech rights to include algorithmic outputs, courts understood speech as mediated through technology. Speech thus became disarticulated from individual speakers. By outlining how legal definitions of speech are indelibly dependent on technology, Petersen demonstrates that future innovations such as artificial intelligence will continue to restructure speech law in ways that threaten to protect corporate and institutional forms of speech over the rights and interests of citizens.
Year: 2022
Primary URL: https://www.dukeupress.edu/how-machines-came-to-speak
Primary URL Description: Publishers website
Secondary URL: https://www.worldcat.org/title/how-machines-came-to-speak-media-technologies-and-freedom-of-speech/oclc/1260291851&referer=brief_results
Secondary URL Description: worldcat
Publisher: Duke University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 978-1-4780-145
Copy sent to NEH?: No


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