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Products for grant GI-259366-18

GI-259366-18
Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty
Emilie Johnson, Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc.

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=GI-259366-18

Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty (updated exhibition) (Exhibition)
Title: Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty (updated exhibition)
Curator: Emilie Johnson
Abstract: Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty is an exhibition that uses Monticello, the home and plantation of Thomas Jefferson, as a lens through which to explore the dilemma of slavery and the lives of the enslaved families and their descendants. Thomas Jefferson’s iconic words in the Declaration of Independence—“all men are created equal”—inaugurated a new nation defined by principles of freedom and self-government, while a fifth of the population remained enslaved. Jefferson called slavery “an abominable crime,” yet he owned 607 people over the course of his lifetime. This exhibition uses the power of place and ideas at Monticello to grapple with the paradox of slavery in an age of liberty. Most notably, Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello brings individuals and families out of the shadows of chattel slavery, pulling from more than 50 years of archaeology, documentary research, and oral histories to fill in the critical human dimension missing from many resources on slavery in the United States. Through the exhibition, visitors can “meet” members of six families who lived and labored at Monticello, as well as their descendants. Their family stories form a narrative arc from slavery to freedom that reflects the trajectory of the nation at large – our ongoing journey to realize the foundational promise that “all men are created equal.”
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.monticello.org/slavery-at-monticello
Primary URL Description: How could the author of the Declaration of the Independence own slaves? How could twenty percent of the population of the new United States, founded on the principles of liberty and equality, live in bondage? What was life like for enslaved people in the early republic? This online exhibition uses Monticello as a lens through which to examine these questions.

Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery (Exhibition)
Title: Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery
Curator: Emilie Johnson
Abstract: In 11 freestanding panels, Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery examines the experience of slavery at Monticello as well as its painful legacies, among them the burdens of inequality still carried by many people of color in the United States. It has been specifically designed to bring the power of place and ideas at Monticello to schools, libraries, and other community venues across the country and draws heavily from material gathered through the Getting Word Oral History Project, amplifying the voices of descendants of Monticello’s enslaved community. In addition to the enslaved families of Monticello, including Sally Hemings and her children, the exhibition introduces the Monticello plantation, Jefferson’s attitudes on race and slavery, and stories from the Getting Word Oral History Project – establishing an overall narrative arc from slavery to freedom and the continuing struggle for equity
Year: 2019

Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery project assistant (Staff/Faculty/Fellow Position)
Name: Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery project assistant
Abstract: Mary Mason Williams Foukal has been engaged to work on finalizing the content and design of Monticello and the Legacies of Slavery, the 11-panel pop up exhibition supported by the grant. She is also working to secure venues.
Year: 2019

Slavery and Its Impact (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Slavery and Its Impact
Abstract: Gayle Jessup White leads a discussion of slavery and its legacies, using her family's history as a lens through which to view the institution.
Author: Gayle Jessup White
Date: 09/22/2018
Location: Southern Methodist University, Dallas TX

A Dialogue with Descendants of Monticello's Enslaved Community (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: A Dialogue with Descendants of Monticello's Enslaved Community
Abstract: Gayle Jessup White leads a roundtable discussion of descendants of Monticello's enslaved community reflecting on their family histories and how they've learned about their ancestors.
Author: Gayle Jessup White
Date: 01/18/2019
Location: Lincoln High School, Dallas TX

A Dialogue with Descendants of Monticello's Enslaved Community (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: A Dialogue with Descendants of Monticello's Enslaved Community
Abstract: Gayle Jessup White leads a roundtable discussion of descendants of Monticello's enslaved community reflecting on their family histories and how they've learned about their ancestors.
Author: Gayle Jessup White
Date: 01/19/2019
Location: African American Museum, Dallas TX

An Evening with Gayle Jessup (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: An Evening with Gayle Jessup
Abstract: Gayle Jessup White presents an overview of the enslaved people of Monticello, drawing closely on her family's history and traditions.
Author: Gayle Jessup White
Date: 02/04/2019
Location: Charles H. Wright Museum, Detroit MI


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