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Products for grant GW-261139-18

GW-261139-18
Chicago Reflects on the 1919 Race Riots
Karen Christianson, Newberry Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=GW-261139-18

Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots (Web Resources)
Title: Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots
Author: Karen Christianson
Author: D. Bradford Hunt
Author: Liesl Olson
Abstract: "Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots" is a year-long initiative to heighten the 1919 Chicago race riots in the city’s collective memory, engaging Chicagoans in public conversations about the legacy of the most violent week in Chicago history. Funded by a National Endowment for the Humanities "Community Conversations" grant, the project is being coordinated by the Newberry Library in partnership with 13 other Chicago institutions. At the heart of Chicago 1919 are 11 dynamic public programs designed to activate audiences and encourage them to examine the mechanisms through which segregation and inequality have been created, solidified, and reinforced over the past 100 years. Each program will focus on a specific expression of institutionalized racism, from policing and education to housing and the media. Chicago 1919 aims to address difficult history, to come together in recognition and reconciliation, and to imagine possible ways forward.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://chicago1919.org/

Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots
Writer: Alex Teller
Director: Alex Teller
Producer: Alex Teller
Abstract: Historians along with staff from the Newberry Library and the DuSable Museum of African American History reflect on the 1919 Chicago race riots. Marking the 100th anniversary of the riots, the Newberry is coordinating a series of community conversations throughout 2019 that explore the legacy of the most violent week in Chicago history.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://youtu.be/a5iMG90XyTw
Access Model: Open access
Format: Video

Chicago 1919 Race Riot Bicycle Tour (Web Resources)
Title: Chicago 1919 Race Riot Bicycle Tour
Author: Newberry Library
Abstract: Vamonde web page and phone app for a 10-mile bike tour through the South Side neighborhoods where violence erupted during the summer of 1919. The tour starts at the only marker of the riots in the city--at 29th Street and the lakefront--and then moves through Bronzeville, Bridgeport, the Stockyards, and back toward the lake. Historical photographs of and information about sites of violence encourage riders to visualize the past. Where did the events of 1919 take place? How have neighborhoods changed over time? Where does one see boundaries and segregation while riding these streets? How can one see and feel history in the city’s built environment?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.vamonde.com/adventure/link/1/774
Primary URL Description: Vamonde web page and phone app for a 10-mile bike tour through the South Side neighborhoods where violence erupted during the summer of 1919.
Secondary URL: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1X4Qj-WoL_4Kr6oreS88qK4Khu7jiRld1&ll=41.82900937564235%2C-87.62908246682639&z=13
Secondary URL Description: Google Map of the bike tour detailed in Vamonde.

Public Newsroom 102: Reporting on Race and Riots—1919 to Today (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Public Newsroom 102: Reporting on Race and Riots—1919 to Today
Writer: City Bureau
Director: City Bureau
Producer: City Bureau
Abstract: At this newsroom, we draw connections to how reporting on the 1919 riots relates to the coverage of segregation nearly half a century later and what, if anything, has changed today. Our featured guests for the evening are Ethan Michaeli, author of The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America (2015), The Obsidian Collection Archives founder Angela Ford, and City Bureau Co-Founder Darryl Holliday. The evening’s conversation between Michaeli, Ford and Holliday is part of a year-long series, Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots, led by the Newberry Library.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.spreaker.com/user/citybureau/public-newsroom-102-reporting-on-race-an
Primary URL Description: Audio recording of the April 4, 2019, program Reporting on Race: From The Chicago Defender and Carl Sandburg to Chicago Journalism Today
Access Model: Open access
Format: Digital File

Migration and Housing: A Century of Color Lines (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Migration and Housing: A Century of Color Lines
Writer: Newberry Library
Director: Newberry Library
Producer: Newberry Library
Abstract: During the 20th century African Americans, Latinos, and Asian-Americans migrated to Chicago from other parts of the country and the world. European-descended residents and recent immigrants responded to these migrations with policies and choices that segregated the city. The 1919 Race Riots in particular set in motion efforts to keep groups of people separate, utilizing a powerful combination of violence, intimidation, and law - from neighborhood associations and restrictive covenants to redlining and contract purchase schemes. Today we have still not solved how to break down the spatial boundaries that separate Chicagoans. Leading the conversation were Lee Bey, architectural critic, photographer, and writer; Dr. Tanesha House, speaker, educator, consultant, and west side activist; and Brad Hunt from the Newberry Library, a historian of housing in Chicago.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FK1JgyhH46Y
Primary URL Description: Video recording of the May 4, 2019, program Migration and Housing: A Century of Color Lines
Access Model: Open access
Format: Video

Segregation and Public Education: Separate and Not Equal in 20th-Century Chicago (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Segregation and Public Education: Separate and Not Equal in 20th-Century Chicago
Writer: Newberry Library
Director: Newberry Library
Producer: Newberry Library
Abstract: This program explored how the legacy of the 1919 riots and the resulting hardening of segregation influenced the trajectory of Chicago’s education system. Elizabeth Todd-Breland, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and author of A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago Since the 1960s, provided an overview of the history of segregation in Chicago's public schools, and especially the relationship between segregation in housing and in schooling, from the early 20th century through the 1970s. Jen Johnson, Chief of Staff at Chicago Teacher's Union and Former CPS History Teacher, discussed how she dealt with teaching this aspect of the city's history to public school students; and also addressed the current state of school segregation and contemporary organizing. The two speakers then engaged in a wide-ranging conversation with each other and opened the discussion to questions and feedback from the audience.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KynboAUc6Mg
Primary URL Description: Video recording of the June 1, 2019, program, Segregation and Public Education: Separate and Not Equal in 20th-Century Chicago
Access Model: Open access
Format: Video

Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots Opening Event (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots Opening Event
Writer: Newberry Library
Director: Newberry Library
Producer: Newberry Library
Abstract: The Chicago 1919 Race Riots were the most violent week in Chicago history, sparked by the death of Eugene Williams, an African American teenager stoned and drowned by a white man for floating his raft over an invisible line into a whites-only South Side beach. The police refused to arrest the white perpetrator, and the city erupted in arson, looting, and thirty-eight deaths (23 black, 15 white), until the National Guard was called to restore order. The riots inflicted lasting scars on the city, still visible in the lines of segregation throughout the city's built environment, its schools, and its selective policing. The Opening Event of our year-long series of conversations on the history and legacy of the 1919 race riots. What happened one hundred years ago on a Chicago beach during a sweltering summer day? How and why did violence erupt across the city? What were the effects of the riots in the ensuing decades? And what can we learn from the past that might help us imagine a better future?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IshlZiHIsZw
Primary URL Description: Video recording of the February 23, 2019, Opening Event for "Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots"
Access Model: Open access
Format: Video

Reflections of Youth: Spoken Word Performance and Conversation (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Reflections of Youth: Spoken Word Performance and Conversation
Writer: Newberry Library
Director: Newberry Library
Producer: L Stop Media
Abstract: In this spoken word performance, held as part of the Newberry's year-long citywide event series "Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots," members of the Young Chicago Authors Bomb Squad shared new work reflecting on the 100-year legacy of the 1919 Chicago race riots. "Reflections of Youth" was held August 12, 2019 at the Harold Washington Library. This video was originally live-streamed courtesy of L Stop Media.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2tr8u-UsfA
Primary URL Description: Video of Reflections of Youth: Spoken Performance and Conversation, held August 12, 2019, at Chicago Public Library's Harold Washington Center.
Access Model: Open access
Format: Digital File

Race Riots and Chicago in 1919: A Digital Exhibition by the Chicago Collections Consortium (Web Resources)
Title: Race Riots and Chicago in 1919: A Digital Exhibition by the Chicago Collections Consortium
Author: David Greenstein
Author: Megan Keller Young
Author: Amara Andrew
Author: Francesco De Salvatore
Author: Erin Glasco
Author: Jonathan Kelley
Author: Ion Nimerencu
Abstract: One hundred years ago, a week of rioting tore open deep racial divisions in Chicago. This timeline of 1919 places Chicago’s race riots in the context of dramatic local and global events that year. Scroll through the timeline and select each entry to explore records that show how Chicagoans experienced explosive labor conflicts, soldiers returning from war, changing migration, a dirigible disaster, and other events that shaped the city in 1919.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://exhibits.chicagocollections.org/1919/index
Primary URL Description: A timeline with images and essays to provide the local and global context of the 1919 Chicago race riots.

Mapping the 1919 Chicago Riot (Web Resources)
Title: Mapping the 1919 Chicago Riot
Author: John Clegg
Abstract: Mapping the 1919 Chicago Riot is a collaborative project from researchers at the University of Chicago to visualise the 1919 riot combining original historical sources with modern geospatial technologies. They have compiled official reports and contemporary newspaper articles to map and detail incidents of deaths, injury, and arson that occurred during the riots, as well as geo-locating original photographs taken during that time.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://chicago1919.org/map
Primary URL Description: Interactive map visualizing the places where all deaths and injuries took place during the 1919 Chicago Race Riots.

The 1919 Race Riots: A Digital Collection for the Classroom (Web Resources)
Title: The 1919 Race Riots: A Digital Collection for the Classroom
Author: Megan Geigner
Abstract: Newspapers, public figures, and family stories have crafted lasting explanations of the violence in 1919 that are still popular. One account suggests that the riots were the result of white ethnic working-class Chicagoans feeling vulnerable in the wake of the Great Migration; in other words, white immigrant laborers felt threatened by black workers as they vied for jobs, housing, and cultural influence in the city. This narrative is an apology for white supremacy, however, and fails to account for the decades of black prosperity in Chicago prior to 1919 that did not result in violence. Archival items held at the Newberry Library tell a deeper story, one about racist housing and labor policies, incendiary newspaper articles, roving bands of violent white youths, and a pivotal moment when black Chicagoans demanded equal protection under the law.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://dcc.newberry.org/collections/the-1919-race-riots
Primary URL Description: The Newberry Library’s Digital Collections for the Classroom website is an educational resource designed for teachers and students featuring primary sources from the Newberry’s holdings, contextual essays, and discussion questions.

Chicago Reflects on the 1919 Race Riots (Public Lecture or Presentation) [show prizes]
Title: Chicago Reflects on the 1919 Race Riots
Abstract: A city-wide series of eleven public programs and development of digital resources exploring the history and aftermath of the Chicago race riots of July 1919 on the centenary.
Author: Karen Christianson
Date: 2/1/19
Location: Chicago
Primary URL: http://www.chicago1919.org

“Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots” Receives 2020 Outstanding Public History Project Award from the National Council on Public History (Blog Post) [show prizes]
Title: “Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots” Receives 2020 Outstanding Public History Project Award from the National Council on Public History
Author: Newberry Library
Abstract: The Newberry Library and the National Council on Public History (NCPH) are pleased to announce that "Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots" has earned the 2020 Outstanding Public History Project Award. The NCPH presents the award annually to a project “that contributes to a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or that serves as a model of professional public history practice.” In 2019, the Newberry Library--in partnership with 13 cultural organizations in Chicago--led Chicago 1919, a year-long initiative commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 1919 Chicago race riots. The NEH-funded project engaged scholars, teachers, activists, poets, journalists, filmmakers, and citizens in a series of community conversations about the decisive role the riots played in cementing racial division in Chicago.
Date: 02/19/20
Primary URL: https://www.newberry.org/chicago-1919-confronting-race-riots-receives-2020-outstanding-public-history-project-award-national
Primary URL Description: Newberry Library blog post/press release
Blog Title: Follow the Newberry
Website: Newberry Library


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