NEH banner

[light] [dark]

[Return to Query]

Products for grant HAA-261214-18

HAA-261214-18
Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories
Janet Hess, Sonoma State University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HAA-261214-18

Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: In this presentation I will present the early, NEH-funded prototype of a digital map of pre- and post-contact American Indian tribal and national regions, cultural histories, and tribally submitted and approved data that is non-archaeological in nature. The prototype, upon completion, will consist of a national map with general information and dynamic details related to three indigenous nations: the Osage, Modoc, and the consolidated Pomo/Miwok. This map will be available to scholars and the public, and envisions future collaboration with, and a centralized reference site for, existing indigenous maps and digital sites. We intend in this project to connect the study of humanities (specifically, indigenous histories and cultures) to conditions of social and cultural life by enabling the public, around the world, to access current and historical maps, cultural practices, and other data related to the life of indigenous peoples.
Date: 11/6/18
Conference Name: Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums

Indigenous American Cultures Mapping Project (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Indigenous American Cultures Mapping Project
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: In this presentation I will discuss some of the challenges and rewards of creating a digital prototype resource focused on the Federated Graton Rancheria (Pomo/Miwok), the Modoc and the Osage. The National Endowment for the Humanities funded this project, which will create the prototype of a digital map of pre- and post-contact American Indian tribal and national regions, cultural histories, and tribally submitted and approved data that is non-archaeological in nature. The prototype, upon completion, will consist of a national map with general information and dynamic details related to three specific nations. This map will be available to scholars and the public, and envisions future collaboration with, and a centralized reference site for, existing Indigenous maps and digital sites. We intend in this project to connect the study of humanities (specifically, Indigenous histories and cultures) to conditions of social and cultural life by enabling the public, around the world, to access current and historical maps, cultural practices, and other data related to the life of Indigenous peoples.
Date: 11/28/18
Conference Name: Whittier College, "Indigenous Mapping"

Collaboration and Mapmaking: Indigenous America (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Collaboration and Mapmaking: Indigenous America
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: In this presentation, I will invite commentary and suggestions for the construction of a collaborative digital resource, "Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories," funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The primacy of Indigenous voices in constructing such resources is emphasized in the existing structure of the project. In addition to presenting the digital map, I invite discussion on such issues as, how do we avoid the Western cartographic bias in mapmaking? How can Mukurtu assist in creating culturally sensitive digital resources? How can collaboration be achieved in a single resource when private and sacred materials and knowledge sets are involved?
Date: 2/6/19
Conference Name: Association of Indigenous American Studies Conference

Digital Mapping and Indigenous America (Book)
Title: Digital Mapping and Indigenous America
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Editor: Isabella Vitti
Abstract: In “Digital Mapping: Indigenous America,” contributors explore the technology and experience of digitally mapping Indigenous nations, regions, and pathways. Employing anthropology, field research, and art historical methodology as well as digital cartography, and including the voices of Indigenous scholars, this text examines projects currently underway to present information about Native American and First Nations cultures and histories in a digital format. For the first time, Indigenous digital mapping projects from across the United States and Canada are brought together in one place and discussed by their creators. The text also examines the issues of community engagement and tribal participation in mapping and digital resources; privacy issues related to sacred sites and practices, including recent shifts in the enforcement of NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act); the role of digital representations of Indigenous communities and conflicts related to such representations; and spiritual and legal concerns related to public engagement with tribal regions. Among the contributors are the creators of Pan Inuit Trails; the Early California Cultural Atlas; the Digital Index of Native American Anthropology; the Director of Cartography for the Smithsonian and the Trust for Public Land; and the creator of Native Land, as well as insight from Indigenous scholars and communities on forms of mapping.
Year: 2019
Publisher: Routledge
Type: Edited Volume
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories (Database/Archive/Digital Edition)
Title: Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: This is an early prototype for the Level 1 digital resource funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Languages and tribal regions are indicated, and tabs are included for research opportunities, tribal resources, and resources for educating children about Indigenous cultures.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://http://indigenousmap.org OR MIAC-LH
Access Model: open access

Art and Art History for Children: Indigenous Art (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Art and Art History for Children: Indigenous Art
Author: Janet Berry Hess
Abstract: In "Art Workshops for Children," Herve Tullet maintains that “[c]hildren are masters of creation—they are very intuitive and it is this instinct and their unedited ability to create art that [is inspiring] . . . collective energy and a great group dynamic is a result in itself. [Teaching art classes] with multiple participants creates an energy that empowers each artist to do new and unexpected things. When we improvise as a group, we work from a place of freedom, where all mistakes are permissible and there’s no such thing” as wrong. Barbara Rucci makes the case that learning about art develops children’s intellectual capacity in all realms: “the value of exposing your children to a world of art runs deep . . . you are helping them strengthen the connection between hemispheres of the brain.” In this class we will read texts on art history and create lesson plans to prepare you to teach children about art, focusing particularly on Indigenous culture. We will be making art in class together to exercise our own creativity and experience the energy and freedom of art, while learning about Indigenous history and culture. You will leave this class with a large number of lesson plans, experience in making and teaching art, a strong grasp of art history globally, and increased knowledge in teaching Indigenous art history.
Year: 2019
Audience: Undergraduate

Digital Index of Native American Archaeology Workshop (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Digital Index of Native American Archaeology Workshop
Abstract: Workshop to examine the utility of the Digital Index of Native American Archaeology to Indigenous nations.
Date Range: August 8-9, 2019
Location: University of California Berkeley

California Indian History Curriculum Coalition Summit Meeting (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: California Indian History Curriculum Coalition Summit Meeting
Abstract: The California Indian History Curriculum Summit is a working group attempting to meet the mandate of the State of California to supply curriculum on Indigenous American history for the state of California, K-12.
Date Range: August 9, 2019
Location: Sacramento, California

Digital Resource Collaboration: The Work Behind Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Digital Resource Collaboration: The Work Behind Mapping Indigenous American Cultures and Living Histories
Author: Janet Hess, Pbonchai Tallman
Abstract: in cooperation with Greg Sarris, the Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, and Victor Temprano, the Canadian creator of the social media resource Native Land, I received an NEH grant to begin creating what we hoped would be an outward facing, resource of many nations. Among the features of this resource in progress are a Google earth depiction of the continent with regions and names of Indigenous nations, a directory of research and tribal resources and resources for children, and the groundwork for telling the story chosen by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria—the story of first contact with the Pomo and Miwok and the reclamation of that story by the establishment of a monument at Drake’s Landing in northern California. In this talk we will discuss the first year of creating a prototype of MIAC-LH, and discuss options for collaboration.
Date: 10/10/2019
Conference Name: Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums

Digital Resistance: Indigenous Resources and Cultural Survivance (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Digital Resistance: Indigenous Resources and Cultural Survivance
Author: Janet Hess
Abstract: The invasion of Indigenous land by Europeans led to the destruction not only of individual lives, belief systems, and connections with specific land regions in the United States, but also of art, architecture, and embodied cultural practices, including respect for gender orientation. The destruction and diminishment of opportunities for the practice of Indigenous culture have heightened in the current political climate, but they continue to be met by resistance and, in the Indigenous term, "survivance." One pathway of survivance in the face of political, corporate, and other institutional destruction is the preservation of forms of knowledge, art and material culture, and documents related to Indigenous histories. Yet information and patrimony related to the distribution of Native American art and architecture, beliefs and ceremonial practices, and other cultural information is widely dispersed among tribal museums, natural history and art museums, private collections, regional and federal libraries, and digital archives. In this session I invite discussion of digital archives and other ingenious survivance strategies: existing archives and their efficacy, ethical issues related to "mapping" Indigenous communities (including critique), ideas for collaboration among existing archives, and visions of future digital or repatriation resources that would benefit Indigenous communities and historians.
Date: 11/07/19
Conference Name: American Studies Association


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=HAA-261214-18