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Products for Grant HD-228732-15

HD-228732-15
Easing Entry and Improving Access to Computer-Assisted Text Analysis for the Humanities
Mark LeBlanc, Wheaton College

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HD-228732-15

DNA and Mandarin: Bringing introductory programming to the Life Sciences and Digital Humanities (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: DNA and Mandarin: Bringing introductory programming to the Life Sciences and Digital Humanities
Author: LeBlanc, M.D. and Drout, M.D.C.
Abstract: The ability to write software (to script, to program, to code) is a vital skill for students and their future data-centric, multidisciplinary careers. We present a ten-year effort to teach introductory programming skills in domain-focused courses to students across divisions in our liberal arts college. By creatively working with colleagues in Biology, Statistics, and now English, we have designed, modified, and offered six iterations of two courses: “DNA” and “Computing for Poets”. Larger percentages of women have consistently enrolled in these two courses vs. the traditional first course in the major. We share our open source course materials and present here our use of a blended learning classroom that leverages the increasing quality of online video lectures and programming practice sites in an attempt to maximize faculty-student interactions in class.
Date: 06/02/2015
Primary URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877050915012661
Primary URL Description: Procedia Computer Science Volume 51, 2015, Pages 1937–1946
Conference Name: International Conference On Computational Science, ICCS 2015 — Computational Science at the Gates of Nature

Exploring Digitized Texts: the Digital Humanities as Makers (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Exploring Digitized Texts: the Digital Humanities as Makers
Abstract: Post-graduation, students are faced with two questions: (1) What do you know? and (2) What can you make? Liberal Arts Colleges, in particular, do an excellent job with helping students to answer the first, however, we struggle with the second. This talk provides examples of how the "maker movement" on our campus intersects with our on-going work in the digital humanities. The rapid digitization of texts presents both new opportunities and real barriers of entry to computer-assisted explorations of texts. We present our open-source Lexos software that provides a simple, web-based workflow for text processing, statistical analysis, and visualization.Lexos was created for use with small to medium-sized collections of texts (rather than large text corpora or “big data”) and expands the range of statistical and visualization methods within reach of Humanities students and scholars, particularly those who are just learning to employ computational techniques in their work. In addition to examples using the software to explore texts from Old English to classical Chinese, the talk will share how research with undergraduates fuels our interdisciplinary teaching and how our teaching generates new avenues for exploration.
Author: LeBlanc, M.D.
Date: 09/10/2015
Location: Denison University, Granville, OH

Lexomic Analysis of Beowulf: Part 1, Cluster Analysis. (Book)
Title: Lexomic Analysis of Beowulf: Part 1, Cluster Analysis.
Author: Michael D.C. Drout, Yvette Kisor, Leah Smith, Allison Dennett and Natasha Piirainen.
Abstract: Michael D.C. Drout, Yvette Kisor, Leah Smith, Allison Dennett and Natasha Piirainen (in press, 2016). Lexomic Analysis of Beowulf: Part 1, Cluster Analysis. New York: Palgrave Pivot, 2016. Application of cluster analysis to Beowulf.
Year: 2016
Type: Multi-author monograph
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Tracking the Moving Ratio of þ to ð in Anglo-Saxon Texts: A New Method, and Evidence for a lost Old English version of the ‘Song of the Three Youths.’ (Article)
Title: Tracking the Moving Ratio of þ to ð in Anglo-Saxon Texts: A New Method, and Evidence for a lost Old English version of the ‘Song of the Three Youths.’
Author: Michael D.C. Drout and Elie Chauvet
Abstract: This paper demonstrates that a plot of the continuously rolling ratio of the characters þ to ð can be used to identify sections of Anglo-Saxon poems whose transmission histories differ from each other. Substantial differences in values of the function ? = þ/(þ+ð) are correlated both with the division between Genesis A and B and with the boundaries of a section of Genesis A that has a source other than the Latin Bible, thus validating the approach. The ?-plot of Daniel contains an anomaly that begins at lines 362–364, precisely those lines of the poem that are paralleled in the runic inscription on the newly discovered Honington Clip, described by John Hines in this issue of Anglia (pp. 257–277). The confluence of the evidence of the archeological find, the ?-analysis, previous traditional and computer-assisted analysis, and recent art historical work by Phyllis Portnoy leads to the conclusion that both the runic inscription and lines 362–408 of Daniel derive from a lost Old English “Song of the Three Youths”. Further investigation shows that the methods can be applied successfully to the Exeter Book poem Azarias, which shares a common ancestor with Daniel. The approach can also be extended by plotting the correlation between ? and the frequency of dental fricatives in final position in Old English texts. The methods therefore not only identify a specific lost Old English source but also possess a potential general utility for reconstructing the histories of Anglo-Saxon texts.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/angl.2015.133.issue-2/ang-2015-0024/ang-2015-0024.xml
Format: Journal

Lexos: a workflow for text analysis (Computer Program)
Title: Lexos: a workflow for text analysis
Author: LeBlanc, M.D.
Author: Kleinman, Scott
Abstract: Lexos is an integrated workflow of tools to facilitate the computational analyses of texts, presented in a web-based interface. Functionality provided includes the ability to "scrub" texts (remove punctuation, lemmatize, consolidate characters, remove stopwords, etc), cut or segment texts, and a suite of options for analysis and visualizations, including creating and downloading Document Term Matrices (DTM) of token counts (both word- and character-ngrams or tf-idf); cluster analysis (hierarchical or k-means, with silhouette scores); rolling-window analyses of substring, word, or regex-pattern occurrences; bubble visualizations (of term frequencies); and word clouds (of term frequencies or MALLET-produced topic modelling results). More functionality is being added on an ongoing basis.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://github.com/WheatonCS/Lexos
Programming Language/Platform: Python and (Javascript, HTML/CSS) Runs in your browser via the web and/or local installations for MacOS, Windows, and Linux.
Source Available?: Yes

Course Materials for Teaching Introductory Programming for Text Analysis (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Course Materials for Teaching Introductory Programming for Text Analysis
Author: LeBlanc, M.D.
Abstract: Five assignments in a semester-long CS-1-like course named Computing for Poets to introduce students to programming within one area of the digital humanities: the application of computing to the study of digitized texts. The course exposes students to leading markup languages (HTML, CSS, XML) and teaches computer programming (Python) as a vehicle to explore and “data mine” digitized texts. Programming facilitates top-down thinking and practice with computational thinking skills such as problem decomposition, algorithmic thinking, and experimental design - topics that humanities students in our experience rarely see. A learning objective for students in this course is to articulate how computational analyses of digitized texts enables both a “close reading” of a single text and as well as a “distant reading” of many texts across time. The goal for each student is to master enough programming to modify digitized texts to help in a computational experiment that explores a question of a text or set of texts.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://www.engage-csedu.org/search/site/LeBlanc
Audience: Undergraduate

Beowulf: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Beowulf: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar
Author: Michael D.C. Drout.
Abstract: An Intensive 5-Day Seminar, highlighting the application of Lexos to digitized texts.
Date Range: December 28, 2014-January 2, 2015 and May 13-15, 2016
Location: Schooling for Life, Los Angeles, CA.

A Reconsideration of the Relationship Between Víga-Glúms Saga and Reykdœla Saga: New Evidence from Lexomic Analysis (Article)
Title: A Reconsideration of the Relationship Between Víga-Glúms Saga and Reykdœla Saga: New Evidence from Lexomic Analysis
Author: Rosetta Berger and Michael D.C. Drout
Abstract: Reconsideration of the Relationship Between Víga-Glúms Saga and Reykdœla Saga: New Evidence from Lexomic Analysis.
Year: 2015
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Viking and Medieval Scandinavia

Topic Modeling Ancient Chinese Texts: Knowledge Discovery in Databases for Humanists (Article)
Title: Topic Modeling Ancient Chinese Texts: Knowledge Discovery in Databases for Humanists
Author: Scott Kleinman, R. Nichols, K. Nielbo, E. Slingerland, U. Bergeton, and C. Logan
Abstract: tbd
Year: 2016
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Asian Studies

Lexomics Across the Academy (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Lexomics Across the Academy
Author: Mike Drout, Mark LeBlanc, and three Wheaton undergraduates
Abstract: Hands-on sessions for faculty at Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU, Charlotte, NC) over a two-day period.
Date Range: Oct. 5-7, 2016
Location: JCSU, Charlotte, NC


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