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Products for grant HD-51531-12

HD-51531-12
The Pathways to Freedom Digital Narrative Project
Deborah Mutnick, Long Island University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HD-51531-12

Toward a Twenty-First Century Federal Writers' Project (Article)
Title: Toward a Twenty-First Century Federal Writers' Project
Author: Deborah Mutnick
Abstract: ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????This article draws parallels between the Great Depression and the Great Recession in light of the history, methods, themes, and relevance of the New Deal Federal Writers' Project to contemporary community writing. Based on a critical analysis of the FWP's legacy as the sponsor of a twentieth century American epic in the state guides and its powerful, if flawed, methodologies, I suggest that a 21st century reprise of the FWP would support already existing university-community partnerships like Long Island University's Pathways to Freedom Digital Narrative Project and support the creation of new ones, thus enacting the "public turn" called for in composition and other disciplines at a critical juncture in American--and world--history. ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/CE/0772-nov2014/CE0772Toward.pdf
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: College English
Publisher: National Council of Teachers of English

The Rhetorics of Race and Racism: Teaching Writing in an Age of Colorblindness (Article)
Title: The Rhetorics of Race and Racism: Teaching Writing in an Age of Colorblindness
Author: Deborah Mutnick
Abstract: Intensifying economic stratification and racism in the U.S. signify capitalism’s deepening contradictions and its inability to realize fundamental promises of equality and democracy. In this article, I argue that the rhetoric of race is a particularly resonant theme for college writing instruction because it lays bare the relations of production that account for disparities of wealth and power. Given the defining role of race and racism in U.S. history, I ask first-year composition students to analyze archival bills of sale for enslaved people in Kings County (Brooklyn) in relation to the assertion that “all men are created equal” in the Declaration of Independence and then to explore the aftermaths of slavery in the 20th century through the Pathways to Freedom Digital Narrative Project mobile app.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://licsjournal.org/OJS/index.php/LiCS/article/view/66
Access Model: Open access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Literacy in Composition Studies
Publisher: Literacy in Composition Studies


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