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Products for Grant HT-50092-14

HT-50092-14
Folger Shakespeare Library's "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" Institute
Owen Williams, Folger Shakespeare Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=HT-50092-14

Spinning with the Braine: Finding New Ways To Feel Violation (Blog Post)
Title: Spinning with the Braine: Finding New Ways To Feel Violation
Author: Whitney Sperrazza
Abstract: This post is a transcript of Whitney Sperrazza's final presentation given July 2, 2015 at the conclusion of "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library. The slides are provided as well in PDF form. She has also included several of the more interesting slides in the body of the text itself. The first part of this talk describes the digital work Sperrazza has already done on “Feeling Violation: Tactile Rendering of the Early Modern Blazon” and the second half gives an overview of how EMDA has shifted her thinking, and some ideas for new trajectories based on a new set of tools and questions.
Date: 7/2/2015
Primary URL: https://spinningwiththebraine.wordpress.com/2015/07/06/finding-new-ways-to-feel-violation-emda-2015-final-presentation/
Blog Title: Spinning with the Braine

Spinning with the Digital: EMDA REFLECTIONS PART 1 (Blog Post)
Title: Spinning with the Digital: EMDA REFLECTIONS PART 1
Author: Whitney Sperrazza
Abstract: This blog post represents the author's reflections towards the end of her experience at the "Early Modern Digital Agendas: Advanced Topics" institute held at the Folger Shakespeare Library over three weeks in June and July 2015.
Date: 6/30/2015
Primary URL: https://spinningwiththebraine.wordpress.com/2015/06/30/spinning-with-the-digital-emda-reflections-part-1/
Blog Title: Spinning with the Braine

Shakespeare, Editor: Visualizing Textual Data (Web Resources)
Title: Shakespeare, Editor: Visualizing Textual Data
Author: Don Rodrigues
Abstract: The goal of Shakespeare, Editor is to deploy digital and traditional analytical methods to visualize the “hand” of William Shakespeare in a selection of works to which he contributed so as to better grasp his role as collaborator and editor. Primary among is Robert Chester’s 1601 multi-author pamphlet, Love’s Martyr, a singular collection containing poems by Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, George Chapman, and John Marston as well as Robert Chester, the traditionally assumed editor of this volume, to whom only this printed work has been attributed. The hypothesis behind this study, which mines and visualizes Love’s Martyr’s authorial boundaries using the NEH-funded Lexos suite and other stylometric applications, is that portions of text attributed to Chester within Love’s Martyr indicate stylistically significant departures from work signed by him here and in manuscript. Moreover, as findings suggest, these sections of text align stylistically and technically far more with Shakespeare’s poetry than with the work of either Chester or the other authors who contributed to the volume.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://shakespeareeditor.weebly.com/
Secondary URL: http://metalab.harvard.edu/2015/12/visualizing-textual-data/

Historical Text Networks (Blog Post)
Title: Historical Text Networks
Author: Michael Gavin
Abstract: In this blog post, Michael Gavin describes his work with historical text networks. He thinks of books as points of connection in a network: when printers and booksellers collaborate to distribute the work of an author, this action can be understood as a link that binds them together. Taken as a whole, these myriad ties form EEBO into a giant social field, or “hairball.”
Date: 6/30/15
Primary URL: http://modelingliteraryhistory.org/2016/01/29/using-networks-to-re-think-periodization-2/
Secondary URL: http://modelingliteraryhistory.org/2015/05/03/historical-text-networks-the-sociology-of-early-criticism/
Blog Title: Modeling Literary History
Website: http://modelingliteraryhistory.org/

Foreign-language phrasebooks and the language of Renaissance comedy (Blog Post)
Title: Foreign-language phrasebooks and the language of Renaissance comedy
Author: Andrew Keener
Abstract: Keener describes his experiments with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to examine the relationship and generic crossover between Renaissance drama and published dialogues for language-learners from the same period. He has also incorporated this approach into his dissertation as a "digital appendix."
Date: 9/5/2015
Primary URL: http://andrewkeener.net/2015/09/05/foreign-language-phrasebooks-and-the-language-of-renaissance-comedy/
Blog Title: Vade Mecum

"How Linguistic Complexity in the Shakespeare Corpus Relates to the Production History of a Commercial Shakespearean Theater” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "How Linguistic Complexity in the Shakespeare Corpus Relates to the Production History of a Commercial Shakespearean Theater”
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Abstract: Brian Kokensparger (Creighton University) presented a paper at the early March 2016 Digitorium conference hosted at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL.
Date: 3/4/16
Primary URL: https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/digitorium/program/

“Seven Reasons why the Shakespeare Corpus is an Excellent Training Context for Digital Humanities Programming” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Seven Reasons why the Shakespeare Corpus is an Excellent Training Context for Digital Humanities Programming”
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Abstract: Brian Kokensparger (Creighton University) will present this paper at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges, Central Plains region. This paper is also being prepared for publication in the next issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.
Date: 4/1/16
Primary URL: http://ccsc.org/centralplains/CCSC.Program2016.Final.pdf

“Transformational Programming: Using the Shakespeare Corpus to Help Students Learn Decision Structures” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Transformational Programming: Using the Shakespeare Corpus to Help Students Learn Decision Structures”
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Abstract: This classroom assignment will be presented at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges, Central Plains region (CCSC-CP) It is being prepared for publication in the next issue of the Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges.
Date: 4/1/16
Primary URL: http://ccsc.org/centralplains/CCSC.Program2016.Final.pdf

Texture Programming Library (Computer Program)
Title: Texture Programming Library
Author: Anupam Basu
Abstract: Basu (Washington University in St. Louis) has created a programming library for handling large scale corpora. The documentation is available at the link below and the library itself should be publicly available in summer 2016.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://abasu.net/texture/
Access Model: dictionary to be publicly released in summer 2016
Programming Language/Platform: Python
Source Available?: Yes

"EEBO Histories and Research Strategies" (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: "EEBO Histories and Research Strategies"
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: Guest Lecture for LC 343: Pop Culture and "Bibliodigigogy," with Kristen Abbott Bennett (course co-taught with Janelle Jenstad and Kim McLean-Fiander of the Map of Early Modern London, or MOEML), Stonehill College, Easton, MA. 22 March 2016.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://kristenabbottbennett.com/2016/01/20/pop-culture-and-bibliodigigogy-in-early-modern-england-class-starts-tomorrow/
Audience: Undergraduate

Seven reasons why the Shakespeare corpus is an excellent training context for digital humanities programming. (Article)
Title: Seven reasons why the Shakespeare corpus is an excellent training context for digital humanities programming.
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Abstract: Kokensparger, B. (2016). Seven reasons why the Shakespeare corpus is an excellent training context for digital humanities programming. Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 31(5), 125-132.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://www.ccsc.org/publications/
Access Model: open access to the CCSC archive section of the ACM Digital Library
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges
Publisher: Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges

Transformational programming: using the Shakespeare corpus to help students learn decision structures nifty assignment (Article)
Title: Transformational programming: using the Shakespeare corpus to help students learn decision structures nifty assignment
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Abstract: Kokensparger, B. (2016). Transformational programming: using the Shakespeare corpus to help students learn decision structures nifty assignment. Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges, 31(5), 160-162.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://www.ccsc.org/publications/
Access Model: open access to the CCSC archive section of the ACM Digital Library
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Computing Sciences in Colleges
Publisher: Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges

Using Ubiqu+lty to Do Theme Analysis on a Literary Corpus (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Using Ubiqu+lty to Do Theme Analysis on a Literary Corpus
Abstract: The hands-on presentation lasted for 1 hour and fifteen minutes on a tool applied to a literary corpus
Author: Brian Kokensparger
Date: 3/2/2017
Location: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Primary URL: https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/digitorium/program/
Primary URL Description: This is the conference program for the University of Alabama's DH gathering
Secondary URL: http://vep.cs.wisc.edu/ubiq/
Secondary URL Description: This is the website for the tool built by the Mellon-funded project, Visualizing English Print, whose leaders presented at the ODH institute

“‘In My End Is My Beginning’: Concluding Epistles as Guides to Early Modern Reading Praxis.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “‘In My End Is My Beginning’: Concluding Epistles as Guides to Early Modern Reading Praxis.”
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: Encouraging attention to paratexts beyond the prefatory, William Sherman argues the “words and signs” marking a text’s end “do more to make . . . a book, and announce it as such, than any other feature.” How might such moments of consolidation also suggest new beginnings for reading? Examining the 1590 Faerie Queene, and its “Letter of the Authors,” provides a sense of possibilities. While many, including Andrew Zurcher, have discussed the “Letter’s” near-terminal placement, modes of reading facilitated by this location remain to be explored fully. Introductory in tone, yet retrospective in effect, the “Letter” provides perspective on a polyvalent narrative, underscoring, in Helen Smith and Louise Wilson’s words, the paratext’s ability to signal “points of entry, interpretation, and contestation,” in a time when much reading was rereading. With an eye to the prevalence of this placement, I will explore ways such a concluding gesture need not signal closure.
Date: 3/31/17
Conference Name: Renaissance Society of America 2017 Conference. Chicago, IL.

“The Queen's Two Corpora: Elizabeth I in Digital Contexts.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “The Queen's Two Corpora: Elizabeth I in Digital Contexts.”
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Author: Kristen Bennett
Abstract: A digital examination of the royal textual corpus
Date: 2/16/17
Primary URL: http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/queen%E2%80%99s-two-corpora-elizabeth-i-digital-contexts
Conference Name: Seminar on Women and Culture in the Early Modern World. Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University.

“A Tale of Four Har[r]isons?: Navigating the Stationers’ Company Archive.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “A Tale of Four Har[r]isons?: Navigating the Stationers’ Company Archive.”
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: A contribution to the SAA workshop led by Hannah Crumme, National Archives, UK, and Heather Wolfe, Folger Shakespeare Library
Date: 3/25/16
Primary URL: http://www.shakespeareassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/2016-Conference-Program-.pdf
Conference Name: Shakespeare Association of America Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA. March 2016

"Finding ‘Miss James’: Approaches to Annotation in The Mary Russell Mitford Archive". (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Finding ‘Miss James’: Approaches to Annotation in The Mary Russell Mitford Archive".
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Author: Molly O'Donnell
Author: Elisa Beshero-Bondar
Abstract: How might editors annotate what they cannot identify? Under such circumstances, might a TEI archive’s own markup lead the way to new discoveries? Within Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, the challenge of locating the mysterious “Miss James” proves emblematic. Referenced solely by patronym, “Miss James” became a topic of conjecture when multiple editors shared questions about the same elusive figure. In letters penned by Mitford in 1819 and after, “Miss James” emerged as Mary Mitford’s trusted friend and advisor. She was also an opinionated humorist, offering assessments of everything from mutual acquaintances to literary works. Yet while her Christian name and profession were later discovered by project editors, her history remains largely unearthed. What insights might processing Digital Mitford’s own markup reveal about such a figure? Inspired by Douglas Duhaime’s visualized co-citations in the EEBO-TCP corpus, we view clusters of related data as forms of annotation—ones that, rendered judiciously, aid both scholars and those newer to Mitford’s oeuvre. Working with XQuery on our eXist database of project files, we first assess the prevalence of relational categories tagged by our editors, then use these counts to weight lists of high-frequency tokens in ranges indexed by a key term. Visualized, the resulting bouquets of knowledge suggest lines of inquiry—ones “locating” the unknown while enhancing perspectives the TEI archive itself may offer.
Date: 10/30/16
Primary URL: http://tei2015.huma-num.fr/en/papers
Primary URL Description: Conference Programme
Secondary URL: https://github.com/ebeshero/mitford
Secondary URL Description: Github data repository link
Conference Name: Connect, Animate, Innovate: the Text Encoding Initiative 2015 Members’ Meeting and Conference. Université Lumière Lyon 2. Lyon, France

“Browsing the Bookshops in Paul’s Cross Churchyard.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Browsing the Bookshops in Paul’s Cross Churchyard.”
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: Focused upon mapped bookstalls in the delimited area of Paul's Cross Churchyard in London prior to the Great Fire of 1666. Through a visual interface, the project will enhance current pathways to and through early modern texts.
Date: 9/17/15
Primary URL: https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/liberact
Conference Name: Liberact III. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, NC.

"Coding Violence: Topic Modeling for Absence in Early Modern Drama" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Coding Violence: Topic Modeling for Absence in Early Modern Drama"
Author: Whitney Sperrazza
Abstract: This paper explores how digital tools, and topic modeling in particular, can help us measure and render violence against female bodies in early modern texts. Literary topic modeling projects thus far have prioritized recognizably thematic word clusters, dismissing other topic outputs as problematic. I instead demonstrate how "junk topics"—those that do not align as neatly with our standards of legibility—can be productive tools for revealing the often coded and implicit registers of violence against women in the early modern archive. Taking Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and Cymbeline as my central examples, this paper will demonstrate how "junk topics" reveal literary and structural patterns that prompt new close readings of gendered violence in these plays. This paper intervenes in early modern feminist studies, while also engaging with digital text analysis practices by proposing a method of topic modeling that attends to the semantically opaque rather than the semantically evident.
Date: 3/31/2017
Primary URL: http://tinyurl.com/h3xeorm
Conference Name: Renaissance Society of America Conference, Chicago, IL

"Considering Water in Three Recipe Manuscripts" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Considering Water in Three Recipe Manuscripts"
Author: Hillary Nunn
Abstract: Renaissance recipe books in manuscript can contain startlingly exotic ingredients. But, while crabs' eyes, snails, and mummia might catch a readers' attention, the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective's searchable transcriptions of manuscript recipe books provide surprising new views of what is typical in English domestic practice. Newly available electronic texts reveal that the most commonly named item in Renaissance recipes is water — an initially unexpected finding that asks us to look at domestic procedures with new eyes. My paper examines the particular varieties of water called for and produced by the era's recipes, as well as water's key role as a tool in domestic production methods. Examining water's largely unnoticed importance, and making explicit the labor and specialized knowledge associated with it in recipe books, my presentation will show how experimenting with new searchable manuscript texts can change our view of domestic practice and women's work.
Date: 4/1/2017
Primary URL: http://tinyurl.com/hdgcnh9
Conference Name: Renaissance Society of America Conference, Chicago, IL

"The Methods of our Manuscripts: Networking and Early Modern Recipe Collaborations" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "The Methods of our Manuscripts: Networking and Early Modern Recipe Collaborations"
Author: Hillary Nunn
Author: Melissa Schultheis
Abstract: The Wellcome Library manuscript MS 7113 epitomizes the promise of working with recipe books to reconstruct early modern social networks. Owned by Lady Anne Fanshawe and later inherited by her daughter, MS 7113 shows the effects of marriages, politics, and social upheavals on early modern domestic life, and its yet-unstudied marginal notations and recipes written in English and Spanish bear the influence of Lady Anne’s travels to France, Ireland, Portugal, and Spain. As these notations often indicate who donated recipes to the household and as particular dishes such as “seviche” and “Spanish Bacon” specify recipe and ingredient location, MS 7113 hints at both the social networks within which the Fanshawes operated as well as the way English households engaged with foreign cookery and medicine. This presentation will trace intersections between Lady Anne’s travels and recipe collecting habits while also demonstrating how today's collaborative methods are bringing to light the networks that created early modern manuscript recipe collections. Taking MS 7113 as our model, we will also show how collaborations like The Early Modern Recipes Online Collective and the Herbal History Research Network allow scholars from disparate campuses to map similarly long-distance relationships that influence domestic practice.
Date: 1/13/2018
Conference Name: Modern Language Association of America, New York. January 2018.

"Doo Comedies like you wel": A Digital Approach to Language-Learning Dialogues and Renaissance Drama (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Doo Comedies like you wel": A Digital Approach to Language-Learning Dialogues and Renaissance Drama
Author: Andrew Keener
Abstract: Using the textual tagging software Docuscope, this paper attempts to clarify the relationship between Renaissance drama and the polyglot language-learning dialogues of authors including John Florio, Claudius Hollyband, and William Stepney. In the past, critics often viewed these multilingual manuals as “sources” for Shakespeare and his contemporary dramatists, or more simply referred to the dialogues as “theatrical.” It is my contention, however, that grouping the dialogues with the drama and subjecting both to a principal component analysis enables us to observe the precise linguistic features that have seemed so “theatrical” to critics. Indeed, this approach renders visible several overlapping characteristics of the language in comedie (particularly “city comedies”) and the language in Florio, Hollyband, and Stepney’s manuals. These findings, as I will show, permit us not only to question the boundaries of city comedy, but to reverse the established paradigm and consider Renaissance plays as staged dialogues for early language-learners.
Date: 3/31/2017
Primary URL: http://tinyurl.com/zzxuy8w
Conference Name: Renaissance Society of America conference, Chicago, IL

Enter Textuality: Shifting Perspectives Through Editorial Studies (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Enter Textuality: Shifting Perspectives Through Editorial Studies
Author: Erica Zimmer
Abstract: An annual One-Day Graduate Student Conference in Editorial Studies held at the Editorial Institute at Boston University. Visit website for the program of speakers.
Date Range: 4/30/2016
Location: Editorial Institute, Boston University, Boston, MA
Primary URL: http://www.bu.edu/editinst/programs/graduate-conference-in-editorial-studies/

"Modeling Early Modern Textual Environments: Digital Archives and the Bookshops in Paul’s Cross Churchyard" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Modeling Early Modern Textual Environments: Digital Archives and the Bookshops in Paul’s Cross Churchyard"
Author: Mary Erica Zimmer
Abstract: How might one model expert reading of early modern archives? While the question may seem unanswerable, emerging methods may well make its exploration possible. Taking Peter W. M. Blayney’s The Bookshops in Paul’s Cross Churchyard as test case suggests both points and paths of entry. Published in 1990, Blayney’s work captivates scholars through its extensive, detailed, reconstructive mapping of the churchyard and its shops. Yet these images’ seeming solidity belies the varied, intersecting forms of evidence required for their creation. Here, the layers of access digital media provide stand poised to fuel the curiosity that stimulates research. Tracing the citations of this 1990 text yields a sample of document types vital to its “book-trade topography,” including early modern wills, leases, visitation books, and State Papers (Foreign and Domestic), to name a few. With characteristic humility, Blayney’s Introduction presents this research as a “skim” for “immediately useful facts.” Such a sense of salience results from the ability to identify key points rapidly through deep understanding of ways early modern documents and individuals may intersect. Encoding a range of Blayney’s sources, with an eye to marking major entity types each contains, electronically reconstitutes a document-based context where characteristic patterns of relation may be considered further. Tools such as Dromio hold the potential to facilitate initial transcription and tagging of these texts, resulting in a digitized body of early modern evidence within which one may hone strategies for modeling the same, while setting groundwork for forms of search able to encourage further engagement.
Date: 7/10/2017
Primary URL: https://digitizingthestage.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/conference-program-now-available/
Conference Name: Digitizing the Stage: Rethinking the Early Modern Theatre Archive. Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford.


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