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Products for grant ME-50046-14

ME-50046-14
South Asia: An NEH Bridging Cultures Project
Lakshmi Gudipati, Community College of Philadelphia

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=ME-50046-14

Audience and Perspective: Colonial Famines in India (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Audience and Perspective: Colonial Famines in India
Author: Aiden Kosciesza
Abstract: This module is part of a larger reimagining of my English 101: Composition I course. The objective of this new style is to rewrite ENGL 101 into a course that combines global material with English composition skills, presented in a modular format with content units that can be switched out year to year according to the needs of the instructor, the interests of the students, or College-wide projects for regional study. This approach intends to heighten students’ global consciousness, making them more culturally aware, and instill in them a greater sense of world citizenship. As such, this reimagining is in line with CCP’s Mission Statement
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

ModuleTitle: Colonialism and Tea (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: ModuleTitle: Colonialism and Tea
Author: Nicholas L. Peterson
Abstract: 1. To examine the production and consumption of beverages as a historical process with significant social ramifications and effects, and to connect student consumption with the history of these beverages. 2. To defamiliarize everyday material such as common beverages by revealing the social and economic context in which these beverages became popular. In terms of tea specifically, to reveal the origins of tea in the context of the social and economic history of the British Empire and its colonial project.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

Unit Title: “Cultural Aesthetics of Revolt and Rebellion” (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Unit Title: “Cultural Aesthetics of Revolt and Rebellion”
Author: Christine Corrigan
Abstract: As any ESL teacher knows, ESL students comprise numerous nationalities with a variety of cultural backgrounds, including a good number from Asian and African cultures. Subject matter based on Indian and African topics would therefore be of interest to students from these backgrounds as well as to other ESL students who wish to gain more intercultural perspectives. An ESL classroom can be said to be a multi-cultural microcosm of the world and students often have a natural interest in familiarizing themselves with their classmates’ backgrounds and cultures. In addition, a goal for most ESL students is to learn about the country where they are learning English; thus, another component of the module focuses on the United States. Students at this level must improve their skills in writing various kinds of essays, paraphrasing, summarizing, and critical thinking. Students will practice these skills with embedded assignments in the context of rebellions against the British in India, Nigeria, and the U.S.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

Module Title: Nationalism and Theater in South Asia (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Module Title: Nationalism and Theater in South Asia
Author: Faculty: Peggy Mecham, Associate Professor of Theater
Abstract: This module will integrate the significant theater and performance forms of South Asia into our student’s understanding of theater history, cultural theory and practice. One of the issues with survey courses is the inevitable generalizing because of time constraints that lead to a superficial presentation of content and analysis. One approach is to include unifying forms and theories to explore multiple historical theater forms and practices. Concepts and constructs of nationalism and its relationship to identity can provide a framework for examining how the stage and scripts support a study and critique of national cultures and identity. All cultures present and represent their history and values in performance. Disruptions of notions of history or cultural and social mores are also often performed, for example, in dada or intercultural performance. An exploration of significant scripts and theatrical periods and styles, reflecting multiple styles of performance in South Asia, will contribute to student’s understanding of the history and culture of particular regions and groups. These studies will also introduce students to conflicts and issues, both historical and current, in South Asia. Additionally, students will increase their understanding of the relationship of theatrical practices and genres historically and in intercultural performance.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

Module Title: An Introduction of the South Asian Concept of Arranged Marriages (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Module Title: An Introduction of the South Asian Concept of Arranged Marriages
Author: Name: Prof. Joanna Labov
Abstract: Rationale: The purpose of this module is to discuss the continued custom of arranged marriages in order to introduce South Asian cultural values to advanced ESL writing/ reading students. It is an excellent way to bridge cultures in a course designed to improve ESL students’ writing, reading and critical thinking skills. An arranged marriage is a custom that is not understood by many people across the globe. It is important for students to examine the custom of arranged marriages because it helps them to understand the values, beliefs and practices of people who come from other cultures. It helps them to understand the concept of marriage from a broader perspective and communicate empathetically with people from other cultures. The students will learn how to write reaction papers, conduct a debate, write a persuasive essay, and a critical analysis essay about the topic. They will read chapters about arranged marriages, view recent films, video clips and read a novel. The module will be four weeks in duration.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

Nonverbal Communication in Art: Hybridity in the Visual Art of India (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Nonverbal Communication in Art: Hybridity in the Visual Art of India
Author: Elizabeth Catanese
Abstract: Course looks at how culture broadly define, influences, and challenges communication.
Year: 2016
Audience: Undergraduate

Module Title: A Case Study of the Architecture of South Asia as Cultural Bridge (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Module Title: A Case Study of the Architecture of South Asia as Cultural Bridge
Author: Michael Stern
Abstract: Course Description: This course explores the major historical design movements and theoretical concepts of architecture and interiors from pre-historical times through the end of the Renaissance (ca. 1600). Lectures and discussions will explore ways of interpreting built forms, as well as illustrative sculpture and painting, so that specific building projects can be understood in the context of the major issues that are central to each historical period. Interior spaces as well as exterior forms will be investigated in order to illuminate the relationship between the container and the contained. While this course focuses predominantly on western architecture, Islamic, Asian and indigenous American architectural history will be investigated as well. This is a writing intensive course.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate

Learning About Indian History Through Temples, Art, and the Ramayana (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Learning About Indian History Through Temples, Art, and the Ramayana
Author: Nicholas Molnar
Abstract: Goals of Unit: To give first-year students a broader understanding of cultures across South Asia, using the topic to discuss the study of the discipline of history in general. The importance of other disciplines to the study of history will be discussed. The students will have many opportunities to write about these topics.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate

Course Modules: Violence, Ethics and the Mahabharata (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: Course Modules: Violence, Ethics and the Mahabharata
Author: W.Esposito
Abstract: This course teaches undergraduates how to research and how to incorporate research materials into a sustained argument having the form of an academic essay. To assist students to these ends, I have chosen the topic of violence and its variants: pacifism, non-violent direct action, etc. Students are assessed primarily through two research papers which they draft and complete. The first explores the social and psychological origins of violent behavior. The second asks whether violence (or non-violence) continues to be useful as an agent of social change. I have therefore written two modules pertaining to South Asian materials for this course. The first revisits the idea of non-violence as understood by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. The second looks at the uses and regrets which attend violent action in the Indian epic The Mahabharata. For a more-nuanced and complete look at how the South Asian materials are integrated with texts originating elsewhere, I refer the reader to the “Introduction of Modules for Faculty” section below.
Year: 2015
Audience: Undergraduate


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