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Products for grant MT-277057-21

MT-277057-21
The SYRIOS Project: Studying Urban Relationships and Identity over Ancient Syria
Kristina Neumann, University Of Houston

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=MT-277057-21

Antioch in Syria: A History from Coins (300 BCE-450 CE) (Book)
Title: Antioch in Syria: A History from Coins (300 BCE-450 CE)
Author: Kristina Neumann
Abstract: Antioch in Syria critically reassesses this ancient city from its Seleucid foundation into Late Antiquity. Although Antioch's prominence is famous, Kristina M. Neumann newly exposes the gradations of imperial power and local agency mediated within its walls through a comprehensive study of the coins minted there and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East. Patterns revealed through digital mapping and Exploratory Data Analysis serve as a significant index of spatial politics and the policies of the different authorities making use of the city. Evaluating the coins against other historical material reveals that Antioch's status was not fixed, nor the people passive pawns for external powers. Instead, as imperial governments capitalised upon Antioch's location and amenities, the citizens developed in their own distinct identities and agency. Antioch of the Antiochians must therefore be elevated from traditional narratives and static characterisations, being studied and celebrated for the dynamic polis it was.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/abs/antioch-in-syria/antioch-in-syria/CC6531DFF053A8BA29E42CFFC2C2EA68
Access Model: No
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 978-110883714
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Digital Numismatics: A Wealth Of Evidence for Ancient Syria (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Digital Numismatics: A Wealth Of Evidence for Ancient Syria
Author: Peggy Lindner
Author: Kristina Neumann
Abstract: This paper discusses how digital numismatics facilitates new research into ancient Syria for both academic and public audiences. From data visualization to a collaborative online exhibit, The SYRIOS Project demonstrates how digital humanities enhance the value of coins as historical evidence. Phase One of the project critically reassesses the city of Antioch by applying the techniques of Exploratory Data Analysis and digital mapping to a database of 300,000 coin finds. Although Antioch’s prominence is famous, a quantitative analysis of coins minted in the city and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East exposes the gradations of imperial power and local agency mediated within its walls. Patterns in coin distribution serve as a significant index of spatial politics and the policies of the different authorities making use of the city. Evaluating the coins against other historical material reveals that Antioch’s status was not fixed, nor the people passive pawns for external powers. Instead, as imperial governments capitalized upon Antioch's location and amenities, the citizens developed in their own distinct identities and agency – both financial and political. Antioch of the Antiochians must therefore be elevated from traditional narratives and static characterizations, being studied and celebrated for the dynamic polis it was. The results of Phase One will be published as a monograph with Cambridge University Press in Summer 2021. Phase Two of the project aims to bring this scholarly research to a public audience through a dynamic online exhibit. Funded by the NEH, our collaborative team from the humanities and technology studies is currently developing a prototype focused on the coins and people of Antioch. Audiences can navigate an introduction to coins as historical evidence with a 3D model and parallax scrolling. Thematic narratives teach users how even a single coin can testify to political, economic, religious, and archaeological histories
Date: 01/08/2022
Primary URL: https://www.archaeological.org/programs/professionals/annual-meeting/prelim-program/
Conference Name: AIA/SCS Annual Joint Conference

“From Coins to Data: New History for Ancient Antioch” (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: “From Coins to Data: New History for Ancient Antioch”
Abstract: This talk discusses how digital numismatics facilitates new research into ancient Antioch in Syria. My monograph, Antioch in Syria: A History from Coins (300 BCE-450 CE) (Cambridge University Press, 2021), critically reassesses the capital city by applying the techniques of Exploratory Data Analysis and digital mapping to a database of 300,000 coin finds. Although Antioch's prominence is famous, a quantitative analysis of coins minted in the city and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East exposes the gradations of imperial power and local agency mediated within its walls. As imperial governments capitalized upon Antioch's location and amenities, the citizens developed in their own distinct identities and agency – both financial and political. This research serves as the foundation for the collaborative online exhibit, SYRIOS: Studying Urban Relationships and Identity over Ancient Syria (https://syrios.uh.edu), which teaches public audiences about how digital humanities methodologies enhance the value of coins as historical evidence.
Author: Kristina Neumann
Date: 04/27/2022
Location: Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey (virtual presentation)

SYRIOS (Web Resource)
Title: SYRIOS
Author: Elizabeth Rodwell
Author: Kristina Neumann
Author: Peggy Lindner
Abstract: The SYRIOS Project began in 2016 both as an outgrowth of research into ancient Syria and in response to the current crisis within the modern region. By focusing on the dynamic presentation of Syrian material culture and the stories of its cities within the Greco-Roman period, we seek to: transform public awareness of the ancient world and Syria in particular revitalize the perception of Syria as a diverse and vibrant metropolitan region exemplify the power of objects as testimony to everyday lives and struggles offer historical professionals an enhanced, digital data source and model applicable to research, teaching, and community outreach invite new perspectives into the research and engagement with this historic place This current exhibit serves as Phase I and “Proof of Concept” for the overall project. It focuses on the history of the Syrian capital city of Antioch and the concept of studying coins as pieces of art and objects that move. From a technical perspective, this initial exhibit provided a platform for investigating overall design, interactivity, and usability.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://syrios.uh.edu


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