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Products for grant PR-234235-16

PR-234235-16
Beyond Management: Data Curation as Scholarship in Archaeology
Sarah Kansa, Alexandria Archive Institute, Inc.

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PR-234235-16

Data Beyond the Archive in Digital Archaeology: An Introduction to the Special Section (Article)
Title: Data Beyond the Archive in Digital Archaeology: An Introduction to the Special Section
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Abstract: This special section stems from discussions that took place in a forum at the Society for American Archaeology's annual conference in 2017. The forum, Beyond Data Management: A Conversation about “Digital Data Realities”, addressed challenges in fostering greater reuse of the digital archaeological data now curated in repositories. Forum discussants considered digital archaeology beyond the status quo of “data management” to better situate the sharing and reuse of data in archaeological practice. The five papers for this special section address key themes that emerged from these discussions, including: challenges in broadening data literacy by making instructional uses of data; strategies to make data more visible, better cited, and more integral to peer-review processes; and pathways to create higher-quality data better suited for reuse. These papers highlight how research data management needs to move beyond mere “check-box” compliance for granting requirements. The problems and proposed solutions articulated by these papers help communicate good practices that can jumpstart a virtuous cycle of better data creation leading to higher impact reuses of data.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/aap.2018.7
Primary URL Description: Publisher's version
Secondary URL: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/2qs03103
Secondary URL Description: Author's self-archived version (open access)
Access Model: Subscription, but author's self-archived version is available open access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Advances in Archaeological Practice
Publisher: Society for American Archaeology

Beyond the Archive: Bridging Data Creation and Reuse in Archaeology (Article)
Title: Beyond the Archive: Bridging Data Creation and Reuse in Archaeology
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Eric Kansa
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Phoebe France
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Ran Boytner
Author: Elizabeth Yakel
Abstract: This article presents research on archaeological data creation and management practices at two excavations in Europe in order to gain a better understanding of how to align these practices with the data reuse needs of a broader research community. The Secret Life of Data project follows the life cycle of data from the field to the digital repository to better understand opportunities and challenges in data interpretation, publication, and preservation. Our “Slow Data” approach focuses not on maximizing the speed and quantity of data but, rather, on emphasizing curation, contextualization, communication, and broader understanding. Through a mixed-methods approach of interviews, field observations, and excavation data assessments, we recommended changes (both technical and organizational) to improve data creation and management practices. We report our findings and offer readers guidance on streamlining data collection for reuse during excavation.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/aap.2018.2
Primary URL Description: Publisher's version
Secondary URL: https://www.oclc.org/research/publications/all/beyond-the-archive-data-creation-reuse.html
Secondary URL Description: Author's self-archived version (open access)
Access Model: Subscription, but author's self-archived version is available open access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Advances in Archaeological Practice
Publisher: Society for American Archaeology

Considering Communities of Practice throughout the Data Lifecycle (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Considering Communities of Practice throughout the Data Lifecycle
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Eric Kansa
Author: Phoebe France
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Ran Boytner
Author: Elizabeth Yakel
Abstract: The use of digital tools for data creation and presentation is pervasive in archaeology, and data preservation and dissemination is becoming common practice. Still, few archaeologists consider the life of their data beyond their own research purposes. This lack of broader consideration of the future uses of a dataset means that many researchers do not sufficiently describe their data to make it intelligible or useful to others, which risks filling repositories with data of very limited use. We present findings from the Secret Life of Data (SLO-data) project, which aims to better understand opportunities and challenges in data interpretation, publication and preservation by following the lifecycle of data from the field to the digital repository. The project’s “slow data” approach emphasizes the need for thoughtful consideration of archaeological data, taking into account its curation, contextualization, and dissemination, as well as how it can contribute to broader understanding now and in the future. We share results from interviews, field observations, and excavation data assessments that our team has conducted at four field sites in three continents. We recommended technical and organizational changes to streamline data collection and management during excavations that will help improve its potential for future use.
Date: 04/12/2018
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology

Beyond Data Management: A Conversation about “Digital Data Realities” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Beyond Data Management: A Conversation about “Digital Data Realities”
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Eric Kansa
Abstract: In a recent "Introspective Digital Archaeology" blog post,Jeremy Huggett asked frank questions about the feasibility of reusing data that archaeologists archive in digital repositories (https://introspectivedigitalarchaeology.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/digital-data-realities/). Despite years of investment in high-profile digital archive programs,data still sees little reuse. Huggett asks whether data are still too siloed, with too little linking for effective discovery and reuse. If so, what measures can we take to better capitalize on research data management so that data reuse becomes more commonplace? Forum discussants will consider digital archaeology beyond the current status quo of “data management” to better situate the sharing and reuse of data in archaeological practice. Within this theme, the panel will discuss data stewardship and preservation, new pathways for interpretation and science, the place of "big data" in archaeology, public engagement, transparency, public policy,compliance, and improving digital literacy. How do we envision the future of digital archaeological data and what ethical implications should we consider? Given the realities of funding and the structure of academic institutions, are these visions realistic?If so, what do we need to do to get there? If not, how can we adjust our visions to fit with these digital data realities?
Date: 03/31/2017
Primary URL: https://web.archive.org/web/20180504215308/https://storify.com/skansa/digital-realities
Primary URL Description: An archived Storify of tweets from the forum.
Secondary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/advances-in-archaeological-practice/issue/0E42182312FF97D724012F0CCA9E0993
Secondary URL Description: A special section of the May 2018 issue of the journal Advances in Archaeological Practice contains six papers that resulted from this forum.
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology

A Reality Check: The Impact of Open Data in Archaeology (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: A Reality Check: The Impact of Open Data in Archaeology
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Eric Kansa
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Ran Boytner
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Phoebe France
Abstract: Paper presented at the Computer Applications in Archaeology conference (Atlanta, GA)
Date: 03/15/2017
Conference Name: Computer Applications in Archaeology

Critical Perspectives on the Practice of Digital Archaeology (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Critical Perspectives on the Practice of Digital Archaeology
Author: Eric Kansa
Abstract: The creation, management, sharing, and preservation of digital data and media have gained great prominence in archaeological research, grant making, policy making, and software and systems development. Digital data has much promise. It can help us engage with wider communities, explore new research questions, and create and preserve a vastly enriched body of archaeological documentation. Digital data also has a certain glamor, gained in large part through its associations with the burgeoning tech industry. However, does our celebration of speed, efficiency, precision and innovation sometimes make technology a superficial distraction rather than a substantive means toward learning? How do we encourage more meaningful intellectual engagement with new media as they transform archaeology? This conference represents an opportunity to take stock and more thoughtfully consider how our embracement of digital technologies is transforming archaeological practice. (This was a one-day conference organized by Organized by Rowan Flad, Chair of the Standing Committee on Archaeology, Harvard University & Eric Kansa, Program Director, Open Context.)
Date Range: 02/03/2017
Location: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Primary URL: https://archaeology.harvard.edu/critical-perspectives-practice-digital-archaeology
Primary URL Description: Conference overview and list of speakers.
Secondary URL: https://web.archive.org/web/20180504220514/https://storify.com/skansa/critdigarch
Secondary URL Description: Archived Storify with tweets and videos of the presentations.

Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations (Article)
Title: Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations
Author: Faniel, Ixchel
Author: Austin, Anne
Author: Kansa, Sarah W.
Author: Kansa, Eric C.
Author: Jacobs, Jennifer
Author: France, Phoebe
Abstract: Archaeological excavations are comprised of interdisciplinary teams that create, manage, and share data as they unearth and analyse material culture.These team-based settings are ripe for collective curation, particularly among the excavation teams responsible for unearthing the materials and the specialists responsible for analyzing them. Yet, findings from four excavation sites show specialist data tend to remain unlinked and decontextualized from excavation data. In this paper, we discuss these findings, the opportunities we identified for collective curation, and responses from the four excavation projects.
Year: 2020
Format: Journal
Publisher: International Journal of Digital Curation

Archaeological Analysis in the Information Age: Guidelines for Maximizing the Reach, Comprehensiveness, and Longevity of Data (Article)
Title: Archaeological Analysis in the Information Age: Guidelines for Maximizing the Reach, Comprehensiveness, and Longevity of Data
Author: Kansa, Sarah Whitcher
Author: Atici, Levent
Author: Kansa, Eric C.
Author: Meadow, Richard H.
Abstract: With the advent of the Web, increased emphasis on "research data management," and innovations in reproducible research practices, scholars have more incentives and opportunities to document and disseminate their primary data. This article seeks to guide archaeologists in data sharing by highlighting recurring challenges in reusing archived data gleaned from observations on workflows and reanalysis efforts involving datasets published over the past 15 years by Open Context. Based on our findings, we propose specific guidelines to improve data management, documentation, and publishing practices so that primary data can be more efficiently discovered, understood,aggregated, and synthesized by wider research communities.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/aap.2019.36
Secondary URL: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/3m35127j
Access Model: Open Access version available through eScholarship
Format: Journal
Publisher: Advances in Archaeological Practice

Toward Slow Data in Archaeology (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Toward Slow Data in Archaeology
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Abstract: Digital data play increasingly prominent roles in archaeological research. However, data tend to be considered “raw materials” that fuel scholarship and not as intellectual contributions in their own right. Most attention on “research data management” focuses on “management” where data are considered mainly through the lens of Taylorism (bureaucratic compliance, standards, incentives, and metrics). Research data management largely aims for “Big Data” research opportunities achieved through centralization, economies of scale, and the efficient production of measurable research outcomes. To provoke debate, this paper suggests an alternative model of “Slow Data” that emphasizes thoughtful consideration of data throughout the research process. Our experience with Open Context shows that to be usable by a wider community, data require substantive intellectual investment in modeling and validation. Ideally, researchers should plan for reuse outcomes well before they start data collection. Thus, the intellectual investment underlying data curation must become more integral to the whole practice of archaeology. Rather than simply rewarding high throughput and impact for easily-measured research outputs (papers or even archived datasets), greater recognition for the research process will promote better contextualization of data, leading to meaningful research outcomes from data integration, greater reproducibility, and better ethical practice.
Date: 4/1/2016
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology

Questioning Standards in Zooarchaeology (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Questioning Standards in Zooarchaeology
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: The scholarly community is giving data increasing attention in recent years, and solutions for data management are emerging. However, seeing data management primarily as a matter of compliance means that we face continued data loss, as many datasets enter repositories without adequate description to enable their reuse. Furthermore, because many researchers have little experience reuse of public data, they lack understanding and incentives to consider changes in their own research practices to facilitate future reuse. Improving data reuse raises the issue of data standards. While many researchers employ standards for simplifying comparisons across datasets, they are constrained by the fact that standards reflect research goals and agendas that are not necessarily universally shared. This paper discusses Linked Open Data (LOD) as an approach to improving data description, intelligibility, and discoverability to facilitate reuse. I present examples of how annotating zooarchaeology datasets with LOD can facilitate data integration without forcing standardization. I conclude by recognizing that data sharing is not without its challenges. However, the research community’s careful attention and recognition of datasets as valuable scholarly outputs will go a long way to ensuring that the products of our work are much more widely useful.
Date: 4/1/2016
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology

The Secret Life of Data Project (Web Resource)
Title: The Secret Life of Data Project
Author: The Alexandria Archive Institute
Abstract: Web page with links to outcomes of the SLO-data project.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://alexandriaarchive.org/secret-life-of-data/

Sharing Zooarchaeology Data: Lessons from 10 Years of Open Context (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Sharing Zooarchaeology Data: Lessons from 10 Years of Open Context
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: Paper presented at the 2016 IC/EC conference of the International Council for Archaeozoology in Zhengzhou, China.
Date: 10/15/16
Conference Name: International Council for Archaeozoology IC/EC conference (Zhengzhou, China)

Integrating Narrative and Data: Synergistic Publishing in the 21st Century (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Integrating Narrative and Data: Synergistic Publishing in the 21st Century
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: William Caraher
Author: Kevin McGeough
Author: Charles E. Jones
Abstract: The publication of detailed excavation and survey results is a fundamental need for archaeology. However, our discipline has long recognized the uphill battle in motivating and financing completion of such works. Changes in the economics of publishing, as well as the rapid proliferation of digital documentation, create new challenges for publishing primary field research in archaeology. Currently, the majority of the evidence (now digital) collected in field research is left behind in the publication process. Rather than consider digital data as a residue of our work that, if lucky, may end up in a repository, we should explore new publication models that richly integrate digital data with narrative syntheses. This paper highlights how this can be cost-effective, improve the reproducibility of archaeological interpretation, reach broader audiences, and have wider impacts. To accomplish these goals, we discuss key aspects of information architecture and the challenge of developing publication workflows that support both narrative and data editorial processes.
Date: 11/15/17
Conference Name: American Schools of Oriental Research

Data Publishing: Editorial and Curation Needs in Archaeology (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Data Publishing: Editorial and Curation Needs in Archaeology
Abstract: Invited lecture presented by Eric Kansa at the conference “Digital Publication in Mediterranean Archaeology: Current Practice and Common Goals," hosted by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York.
Date Range: 10/20/17
Location: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
Primary URL: http://isaw.nyu.edu/library/blog/dig-pub-med-arch2017
Primary URL Description: ISAW blog

Open Context (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Open Context
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: Invited lecture at the Linked Pasts III symposium at Stanford University, providing one of several active case studies and provocations to address the challenges of linking people, their works, and place in time. The setting provided a unique opportunity for scholars, technologists, librarians, and archivists to explore, build and shape linked data practices together.
Date Range: 12/4/17
Primary URL: https://shc.stanford.edu/events/linked-pasts-iii-new-voices-old-places
Primary URL Description: Stanford Humanities Center

Forum: Making Archaeology FAIR (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Forum: Making Archaeology FAIR
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Julian Richards
Abstract: Making Archaeology FAIR was a forum co-organized by Sarah Kansa (Open Context) and Julian Richards (Archaeology Data Service), with eight panelists including SLO-data team members Anne Austin and Eric Kansa. Abstract: Most archaeologists today use computers and other digital technology to document their work. Many develop data management plans, as required by many funders of archaeology in recent years. Still, most archaeologists lack a clear understanding of both how to make their data widely accessible and intelligible for reuse, and why they would want to do so. This forum discusses the FAIR Data Principles, developed to guide data creators and publishers in making data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). Each forum discussant will select one FAIR principle to discuss in the context of archaeology. How well does archaeology currently address each of these challenges? Since archaeology can be a destructive practice, how much effort should we put into ensuring that our data is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable? What can we do to ensure that these goals are prioritized at a project’s inception, rather than as an afterthought? How do we ensure that archaeologists collecting data also share algorithms, tools, and workflows that led to that data? Are there additional principles that define “good” data dissemination in archaeology? Forum attendees can prepare for the discussion by reading “The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship”: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18
Date: 4/1/18
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology

Which future for digital heritage? (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Which future for digital heritage?
Author: Eric Kansa
Abstract: Workshop/Panel participation (October 2018): Which future for digital heritage? (panelist Eric Kansa). Panel organized by Franco Niccolucci, PARTHENOS and ARIADNEplus Project Coordinator (DigitalHERITAGE 2018, San Francisco, CA)
Date Range: 10/28/18
Location: San Francisco, CA
Primary URL: http://www.digitalheritage2018.org/
Primary URL Description: Conference website

The Case for Slow Data (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Case for Slow Data
Abstract: Invited public lecture at Boston University.
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Date: 9/15/16
Location: Boston University

All Data Big and Small: Archaeology, Ethics, and Professionalism in the Age of the Web (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: All Data Big and Small: Archaeology, Ethics, and Professionalism in the Age of the Web
Abstract: Digital data has grown in prominence across the humanities, social sciences and archaeology. Our experience with Open Context (http://opencontext.org), an open access data publishing service for archaeology, shows that preserving, communicating, aggregating and reusing digital data all involve significant intellectual challenges and opportunities. While our profession increasingly recognizes these possibilities, we rarely discuss the professional context that shapes the "datafication" of our discipline. Our current institutional landscape increasingly demands the commoditization, marketing, and branding of scholarship. However, meaningful digital engagement requires greater professional recognition for the process and ethical conduct of research - rather than rewarding only the efficient production of measurable research outcomes. The term "Slow Data" helps to encapsulate this need, and the need for longer term institutional support in better situating data in archaeological practice.
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Date: 4/28/16
Location: Stanford University Archaeology Center
Primary URL: https://classics.stanford.edu/events/all-data-big-and-small-archaeology-ethics-and-professionalism-age-web-eric-kansa
Primary URL Description: Stanford University Classics events

Writing and Reviewing Responsible Data Management Plans (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Writing and Reviewing Responsible Data Management Plans
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Elizabeth Yakel
Author: Ran Boytner
Abstract: Archaeology is a data-rich discipline, and the management and preservation of digital data are integral to all aspects of ethically responsible professional practice. Public and private granting bodies recognize the importance of data, and often formalize this recognition by requiring grant seekers to provide “data management plans.” However, many archaeologists lack familiarity with good research data management practices and how these articulate with other aspects of research. This paper is informed by the ongoing, NEH-funded Secret Life of Data (SLO-Data, https://alexandriaarchive.org/secret-life-of-data/) study which uses evidence from observations of ongoing excavations as well as interviews with reusers to improve archaeological data workflows and guide researchers in how to create meaningful data management plans. The discussion will consider each step of the research life-cycle from planning, data modeling, fieldwork, laboratory, and collections studies, to collaboration within teams and, finally, dissemination, preservation, and reuse. We will highlight the intellectual commitment needed to contextualize data, including the need to link and relate project data with the data contributions curated by other experts. The paper will also highlight criteria that need to be considered in peer review so that grant review processes can better recognize and reward excellence. Finally, responsible research data management needs to be more integral to publishing and not just granting practices. Therefore, the paper will conclude with recommendations to help guide publishers, editors, and peer reviewers in evaluating the reproducibility of claims made with research data.
Date: 11/15/18
Conference Name: American Schools of Oriental Research

Creating Usable Data: A View from the Trenches (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Creating Usable Data: A View from the Trenches
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: Archaeologists share an ethical obligation to publish, archive, and share their field data and research results. One expectation of making archaeological data publicly available is its eventual reuse. Yet, research into archaeological data reuse demonstrates that building accessible data repositories does not necessarily result in substantial reuse of archaeological data (Huggett 2018). What limitations prevent archaeological data from reuse and how can these be addressed during and after archaeological fieldwork? The Secret Life of Data (SLO-data) project follows the lifecycle of data from the field to the digital repository to better understand opportunities and challenges in data interpretation, publication, and reuse. We use a mixed-methods approach of interviews, field observations, and excavation data assessments to identify the challenges faced by four different archaeological sites around the world. Our subjects are international teams comprised of senior excavation staff, students, registrars, and specialists, all engaged with data creation, but sometimes asynchronously and with personnel changes from year to year. In this paper, we report common findings that impeded archaeological data reuse across these four projects based on interviews and observations conducted during the 2016-2018 field seasons. We then review how technical and organizational adjustments that resulted from these findings impacted data creation and management practices at each site. We conclude with a discussion of how these findings can be applied to archaeological projects more broadly to better streamline data collection during fieldwork and in the lab for project sharing and eventual reuse. Works Cited Huggett, J. (2018). Reuse Remix Recycle: Repurposing Archaeological Digital Data. Advances in Archaeological Practice, 6(2), 93-104. doi:10.1017/aap.2018.1
Date: 9/7/19
Conference Name: European Association of Archaeologists

Designing, Timing, and Determining the Feasibility of Curatorial Interventions to Support Data Reuse (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Designing, Timing, and Determining the Feasibility of Curatorial Interventions to Support Data Reuse
Writer: Elizabeth Yakel
Writer: Sarah W. Kansa
Director: Ixchel Faniel
Producer: OCLC
Abstract: Webinar (October 2019): Designing, Timing, and Determining the Feasibility of Curatorial Interventions to Support Data Reuse (Sarah Whitcher Kansa and Elizabeth Yakel, presenters). This webinar, organized and hosted by OCLC Research, explored how data production, sharing, and curation practices facilitate and inhibit data reuse and to discuss the design, timing, and feasibility of curatorial interventions that enable the smooth flow of data throughout the lifecycle. View here (length: 57 minutes): https://www.oclc.org/research/events/2019/103119-designing-timing-determining-curatorial-interventions-data-reuse.html
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.oclc.org/research/events/2019/103119-designing-timing-determining-curatorial-interventions-data-reuse.html
Primary URL Description: Webinar available at the OCLC events webpage
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Web

Best Practices for Digital Scholarship (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Best Practices for Digital Scholarship
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Charles E. Jones
Abstract: Best Practices for Digital Scholarship is a 3-year session co-organized by Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context) and Charles E. Jones (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). The theme for Year 1 was "Networking and publishing: navigating social media, conventional publishing, and digital dissemination services" and featured presentations by five speakers, followed by a discussion. Year 2 (Nov. 2020) will focus on integrating excavation data and specialist data, with perspectives from eight panelists including project directors and a variety of specialists. Year 1 Presentations: Charles E. Jones (Pennsylvania State University), “Sharing Your Work: Library Ethics, Privacy, and Commercial Repositories” (15 min.) Erin Averett (Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska), Derek Counts (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), and Kevin Garstki (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), “Bridging Divides: Hybrid Approaches to Publishing 3D Data” (15 min.) Kevin McGeough (University of Lethbridge), Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context), Charles Jones (Pennsylvania State University), Andrea Berlin (Boston University), William Caraher (University of North Dakota), Eric Kansa (Open Context), “Digital Media Policies for ASOR Publications” (15 min.) Eric Kansa (Open Context) and Sarah Whitcher Kansa (Open Context), “Expanding the Reach, Scope, and Significance of Archaeological Publication” (15 min.) Suzanne Pilaar Birch (University of Georgia), “Discussant” (15 min.)
Date Range: 11/15/19
Location: American Schools of Oriental Research conference, San Diego, CA

Expanding the Reach, Scope, and Significance of Archaeological Publication (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Expanding the Reach, Scope, and Significance of Archaeological Publication
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Abstract: Publication needs to promote more responsible stewardship of the archaeological and historical record. In order to meet this goal, this talk will outline good practices in the use of digital publishing services that have the support of digital library and other preservation services required to curate scholarly content for the long term. This talk will highlight Open Context’s collaborations with scholarly publishers, and recent progress in augmenting conventional publication workflows with more the editorially supported preparation, cleaning, documentation, curation, publication and repository archiving of large datasets, including 3D media. While advancing our ethical conduct, these examples will demonstrate how improved publication practices can help archaeologists address pressing public outreach, education, preservation, and research needs.
Date: 11/15/19
Conference Name: American Schools of Oriental Research

Archaeological data practices and the implications for successful data sharing and reuse (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Archaeological data practices and the implications for successful data sharing and reuse
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Abstract: Keynote presentation by Ixchel Faniel for the SEADDA (Saving European Archaeology from the Digital Dark Age) Working Group 4: Use and Reuse of Archaeological Data (Virtual Zoom Workshop, hosted by Julian Richards and Holly Wright, University of York).
Date: 3/31/20
Primary URL: https://www.seadda.eu/?page_id=1103
Primary URL Description: SEADDA Working Group 4 webpage
Conference Name: SEADDA (Saving European Archaeology from the Digital Dark Age)

Exploring data creation and instruction in field settings with an eye towards reuse (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Exploring data creation and instruction in field settings with an eye towards reuse
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Phoebe France
Abstract: Presentation by Sarah W. Kansa, on behalf of the SLO-data team, for the SEADDA (Saving European Archaeology from the Digital Dark Age) Working Group 4: Use and Reuse of Archaeological Data (Virtual Zoom Workshop, hosted by Julian Richards and Holly Wright, University of York).
Date: 3/31/20
Primary URL: https://www.seadda.eu/?page_id=1103
Primary URL Description: SEADDA Working Group 4 webpage
Conference Name: SEADDA (Saving European Archaeology from the Digital Dark Age)

Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Sarah W. Kansa
Author: Eric C. Kansa
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Phoebe France
Abstract: Archaeological excavations are comprised of interdisciplinary teams that create, manage, and share data as they unearth and analyse material culture.These team-based settings are ripe for collective curation, particularly among the excavation teams responsible for unearthing the materials and the specialists responsible for analyzing them. Yet, findings from four excavation sites show specialist data tend to remain unlinked and decontextualized from excavation data. In this paper, we discuss these findings, the opportunities we identified for collective curation, and responses from the four excavation projects.
Date: 2/19/20
Primary URL: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/idcc20
Primary URL Description: Web page for IDCC 2020
Conference Name: International Digital Curation Conference

Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations (Article)
Title: Identifying Opportunities for Collective Curation During Archaeological Excavations
Author: Ixchel Faniel
Author: Anne Austin
Author: Sarah Whitcher Kansa
Author: Eric Kansa
Author: Jennifer Jacobs
Author: Phoebe France
Abstract: Archaeological excavations are comprised of interdisciplinary teams that create, manage, and share data as they unearth and analyse material culture. These team-based settings are ripe for collective curation during these data lifecycle stages. However, findings from four excavation sites show that the data interdisciplinary teams create are not well integrated. Knowing this, we recommended opportunities for collective curation to improve use and reuse of the data within and outside of the team.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.2218/ijdc.v15i1.699
Primary URL Description: Article DOI
Secondary URL: http://www.ijdc.net/article/view/699
Secondary URL Description: Article on the journal's website
Access Model: Open Access (CC BY)
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: International Journal of Digital Curation
Publisher: International Journal of Digital Curation


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