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Products for grant PW-259002-18

PW-259002-18
Digitizing Plimoth Plantation’s 17th-Century Historical Archaeology Collections
Christa Beranek, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PW-259002-18

“WE MAY HAVE PROFITABLE COMMERCE AND TRADE TOGETHER”: AN ANALYSIS OF 17TH-CENTURY CERAMICS IN PLYMOUTH COLONY (Report)
Title: “WE MAY HAVE PROFITABLE COMMERCE AND TRADE TOGETHER”: AN ANALYSIS OF 17TH-CENTURY CERAMICS IN PLYMOUTH COLONY
Author: Elizabeth G. Tarulis
Abstract: This thesis analyzes the formation of early English colonial trade networks through an examination of three Plymouth Colony sites. Although Plymouth Colony has been studied extensively by both historians and archaeologists, materials from the original settlement have only recently been identified by University of Massachusetts, Boston archaeologists at Burial Hill in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts. This thesis compares the 17th-century ceramics from Burial Hill (1620-c. 1660) to two homesteads established later by Plymouth colonists, the Alden First Home Site and the Allerton/Prence/Cushman Site. A minimum number of vessels (MNV) was established for each site and the country of origin was established for each vessel to determine the origin of consumer goods, specifically ceramics, in Plymouth Colony. These vessels were then divided up into “English” and “foreign” categories, and a chi-square analysis was conducted to determine whether the composition of ceramics was significantly different at Burial Hill than at the later two sites. By comparing a site that likely pre-dates the implementation of most of the Navigation Acts (1651, 1660) to two sites that continue decades after their passage, it is possible to determine whether there was a significant effect on Plymouth’s trade. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the difference between Burial Hill, the Alden First Home Site, and the Allerton/Prence/Cushman Site with respect to proportions of English to Foreign vessels is not statistically significant. This suggests that the percentage of foreign vessels did not significantly change over time. In addition, there were more English and foreign ware types found at the later sites than at Burial Hill. Combined with documentary evidence, this indicates that the Plymouth colonists were skirting regulations and establishing their own personal and intercolonial trade networks, even as the English government tried to limit them.
Date: 4/30/2020
Primary URL: https://www.umb.edu/library
Primary URL Description: UMass Boston library
Access Model: Open Access MA thesis

Local Collections, Global Perspective: Ceramics and Trade in Plymouth Colony (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Local Collections, Global Perspective: Ceramics and Trade in Plymouth Colony
Abstract: A discussion of the imported ceramics found in the 17th-century Plymouth colony based on the collections from three archaeological sites.
Author: Elizabeth G. Tarulis
Date: 10/10/2019
Location: Duxbury, MA, Alden Kindred

'From Parts beyond the Seas': An analysis of trade and Plymouth colony ceramics (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: 'From Parts beyond the Seas': An analysis of trade and Plymouth colony ceramics
Author: Elizabeth G. Tarulis
Abstract: An analysis of trade and Plymouth colony (MA) ceramics using data from three 17th-century archaeological sites.
Date: 1/9/2020
Conference Name: Society for Historical Archaeology Annual Meeting

History in a New Light: Illuminating the Archaeology of Historic Patuxet and Plymouth (Exhibition)
Title: History in a New Light: Illuminating the Archaeology of Historic Patuxet and Plymouth
Curator: Jade Luiz
Abstract: History in a New Light demonstrates how the modern town of Plymouth has been shaped by the ways humans have lived along these shores for thousands of years, and how this land continues to reveal stories of a transcultural Indigenous-Colonial regional society. By using multiple lines of evidence, including archaeology, documentary research, oral history, and fine and decorative arts, the exhibition shows how each thread contributes something unique to Plimoth Plantation’s understanding, re-creation, and interpretation of the past. Rather than a traditional commemorative 400th-anniversary exhibit, History in a New Light is forward-looking and invites visitors to consider how the past serves as a foundation for the future. It is also distinctive as the first major exhibit displaying artifacts from the Wampanoag village of Patuxet and the site of the original 1620 European settlement, which were discovered in 2016 by Project 400 archaeologists, an ongoing archaeological research initiative conducted in partnership with the Andrew Fiske Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Massachusetts - Boston, the Town of Plymouth, and Plimoth Plantation. In addition to finding the first evidence of these overlapping settlements, this research has forced scholars to reevaluate their understanding of daily life in early Plymouth and the nature of colonial and indigenous interactions.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://plimoth.org/learn/multimedia-reference-library/discover-collections-and-archives/collections-archaeology-plimoth#current
Primary URL Description: Plimoth Plantation's Collections and Exhibits webpage


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