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Products for grant PW-259091-18

PW-259091-18
The Origins of a Slave Society: Digitizing Flowerdew Hundred
Jillian Galle, Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Inc.

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PW-259091-18

Creating Context: Analyzing Legacy Documentary Data to Understand the Emergence of Enslaved Societies at Flowerdew Hundred Plantation (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Creating Context: Analyzing Legacy Documentary Data to Understand the Emergence of Enslaved Societies at Flowerdew Hundred Plantation
Author: Elizabeth Bollwerk
Author: Jillian E. Galle
Author: Lynsey Bates
Author: Leslie Cooper
Author: Fraser Neiman
Abstract: By late 1619, 15 of the first 25 enslaved Africans imported into British North America were laboring at Flowerdew Hundred, a thousand acre plantation on the James River in Virginia. They joined indentured Europeans, neighboring Weanock Indians, and elite European landowners in shaping the mid-17th century expansion of plantation settlements across the Chesapeake, an expansion which led to the emergence of a tobacco plantation labor force comprised almost entirely of enslaved Africans and their descendants by 1700. Since the 1970s, archaeological research at Flowerdew has produced hundreds of thousands of artifacts and dozens of linear feet of unbound field records and maps. A new project led by the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (www.daacs.org) is re-analyzing collections from four of the earliest and most significant 17th-century archaeological sites at Flowerdew. We describe the protocols used to parse these documents into a relational PostgreSQL database that allows us to directly link legacy field data to related artifacts, images, and maps. We also illustrate how the standardized digital data produced by DAACS will enable students, scholars, and the public to advance our understanding of the multicultural dynamics behind the emergence of a slave society in British North America.
Date: 04/13/2019
Conference Name: 84th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology

An Introduction to the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery's Latest Project – The Origins of A Slave Society: Digitizing Flowerdew Hundred (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: An Introduction to the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery's Latest Project – The Origins of A Slave Society: Digitizing Flowerdew Hundred
Author: Elizabeth Bollwerk
Abstract: By late 1619, 15 of the first 25 enslaved Africans imported into British North America were laboring at Flowerdew Hundred, a thousand acre plantation on the James River in Virginia. They joined indentured Europeans, neighboring Weanock Indians, and elite European landowners in shaping the mid-17th century expansion of plantation settlements across the Chesapeake, an expansion which led to the emergence of a tobacco plantation labor force comprised almost entirely of enslaved Africans and their descendants by 1700. Since the 1970s, archaeological research at Flowerdew has produced hundreds of thousands of artifacts and dozens of linear feet of unbound field records and maps. A new project led by the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (www.daacs.org) is re-analyzing collections from four of the earliest and most significant 17th-century archaeological sites at Flowerdew. We describe the protocols used to parse these documents into a relational PostgreSQL database that allows us to directly link legacy field data to related artifacts, images, and maps. We also illustrate how the standardized digital data produced by DAACS will enable students, scholars, and the public to advance our understanding of the multicultural dynamics behind the emergence of a slave society in British North America.
Date: 09/28/2019
Conference Name: University of Virginia's Department of Anthropology Brown Bag Seminar


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