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Products for grant PW-264004-19

PW-264004-19
Mapping the Scottish Reformation
Michelle Brock, Washington and Lee University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PW-264004-19

Blog post: Verbs and the Clerical Life Cycle in Early Modern Scotland (Blog Post)
Title: Blog post: Verbs and the Clerical Life Cycle in Early Modern Scotland
Author: Christopher Langley
Author: Michelle Brock
Abstract: This post explores the ways that Hew Scott categorized clerical careers in the Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae, how they have clouded modern understandings of ministerial trajectories, and how Mapping the Scottish Reformation aims to correct this issue.
Date: 10/1/2019
Primary URL: http://mappingthescottishreformation.org/project-reports/verbs-and-the-clerical-life-cycle-in-early-modern-scotland/
Blog Title: Verbs and the Clerical Life Cycle in Early Modern Scotland
Website: Mapping the Scottish Reformation

Blog post: Mapping Parishes, c.1560-1689 (Blog Post)
Title: Blog post: Mapping Parishes, c.1560-1689
Author: Chris R. Langley
Abstract: A look at how the Project Directors have begun to map Scottish parishes.
Date: 10/01/2019
Primary URL: http://mappingthescottishreformation.org/project-reports/mapping-parishes/
Blog Title: Mapping Parishes, c.1560-1689
Website: Mapping the Scottish Reformation

Working with Imperfect Manuscripts: Image Manipulation in MSR (Blog Post)
Title: Working with Imperfect Manuscripts: Image Manipulation in MSR
Author: Chris R. Langley
Abstract: This post covers challenges of working with imperfect manuscripts and difficult paleography, and the range of solutions we have used thus far.
Date: 11/20/2019
Primary URL: http://mappingthescottishreformation.org/methodology/working-with-imperfect-manuscripts-image-manipulation-in-msr/
Website: Mapping the Scottish Reformation

Driving our Data (Blog Post)
Title: Driving our Data
Author: Chris R. Langley
Author: Michelle D. Brock
Abstract: This post discusses the use of Wikidata to build access to reliable information on clerical careers.
Date: 05/08/2020
Primary URL: http://mappingthescottishreformation.org/resources/driving-our-data/
Website: Mapping the Scottish Reformation

Mapping the Scottish Reformation: Tracing Careers of the Scottish Clergy, 1560-1689 (Article)
Title: Mapping the Scottish Reformation: Tracing Careers of the Scottish Clergy, 1560-1689
Author: Michelle D. Brock
Author: Chris R. Langley
Abstract: This article introduces readers to Mapping the Scottish Reformation, a digital prosopography of ministers who served in the Church of Scotland between the Reformation Parliament of 1560 to the Revolution in 1689. By extracting data from thousands of pages of ecclesiastical court records held by the National Records of Scotland, Mapping the Scottish Reformation (MSR) tracks clerical careers, showing where they were educated, how they moved between parishes, their age, their marital status, and their disciplinary history. This early modern data drives a powerful mapping engine that will allow users to build their own searches to track clerical careers over time andspace. In short, Mapping the Scottish Reformation puts clerical careers – and, indeed, Scottish religious history more generally – quite literally on the map.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.irss.uoguelph.ca/index.php/irss/article/view/5834
Access Model: open access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: International Review of Scottish Studies
Publisher: The University of Guelph

Mapping Religious Change with Messy Data (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Mapping Religious Change with Messy Data
Abstract: This presentation explores the data that underpins Mapping the Scottish Reformation, a project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities that traces the careers of Scottish clergymen between the Reformation of 1560 and the Glorious Revolution of 1689. At first glance, the Church of Scotland’s meticulous records present an image of a rigid structure consistent over time and space that would ideally suit a digital approach. However, our period was one of dramatic shifts and regional diversity. Ecclesiastical policy was hotly debated; parishes were created, dissolved, or united with each other; and ministers’ roles changed, from mere exhorter to preacher of God’s word. This presentation discusses how Mapping the Scottish Reformation seeks to capture this data while remaining sensitive to messiness of clerical experiences during the pivotal post-Reformation era.
Author: Michelle D. Brock
Author: Chris R. Langley
Date: 01/24/2020
Location: Edinburgh, UK
Primary URL: https://www.cdcs.ed.ac.uk/events/mapping-religious-change-messy-data


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