NEH banner

[light] [dark]

[Return to Query]

Products for grant PW-264040-19

PW-264040-19
HIMME: Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East
Thomas Carlson, Oklahoma State University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PW-264040-19

Questions Beget Questions: An Example of Digital History Research (Blog Post)
Title: Questions Beget Questions: An Example of Digital History Research
Author: Thomas A. Carlson
Abstract: In working on the Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East (HIMME), questions often arise of the form whether something or someone mentioned in one source is the same place or person as mentioned with the same name in a different source. I call this mini-research: usually all it requires is looking up the passage in each source and comparing what it says. But sometimes it requires more, as I experienced today when I was led on a chase through four medieval sources in three different languages (five if you count modern translations!) by my attempt to determine whether a “chapel of St. John” mentioned by a thirteenth-century Latin pilgrim might be the same as a “church of St. John” mentioned by a twelfth-century Syriac historian-patriarch.
Date: 05/13/2020
Primary URL: https://mafqudwamawjud.wordpress.com/2020/05/13/questions-beget-questions-an-example-of-digital-history-research/
Primary URL Description: Blog post
Blog Title: Mafqud wa-Mawjud
Website: Mafqud wa-Mawjud

Graduate Workshop on Diversity in the Medieval Middle East (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Graduate Workshop on Diversity in the Medieval Middle East
Author: Margaret Gaida
Author: Thomas A. Carlson
Abstract: The medieval Middle East was the most ethnically, religiously, and linguistically diverse literate society in the premodern world, yet it has too often been studied through the lens of a single literary tradition. This workshop invites early graduate students (considering their options for research topics) to discuss the place of diversity in the region and consider topics which cross the communal and linguistic boundaries imposed on premodern history by most graduate education today. The goal is to expose graduate students to the region’s diversity early in their academic trajectory to allow them to acquire the skills necessary to pursue wide-ranging research. The workshop will invite graduate students to discuss their potential research projects, while introducing participants to scholarly resources and evidence for exploring diversity in the medieval Middle East. The workshop will also introduce participants to the Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East (HIMME), an NEH-sponsored digital history project to make the linguistic diversity of medieval Middle Eastern textual sources visible. HIMME is scheduled for publication in summer 2021, so this workshop provides an exclusive opportunity for graduate students to utilize the collected data for their research.
Date Range: 05/18-22/2020
Location: Zoom


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=PW-264040-19