NEH banner

[light] [dark]

[Return to Query]

Products for grant RA-235170-16

RA-235170-16
Long-Term Research Fellowships in India sponsored by the American Institute of Indian Studies
Philip Lutgendorf, American Institute of Indian Studies

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-235170-16

Embodied Divinities and Professional Dancers on the Ramlila Stage (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Embodied Divinities and Professional Dancers on the Ramlila Stage
Author: Pamela Lothspeich
Abstract: Ramlila is an annual performance tradition in India that tells the story of the Hindu god Ram, typically over 10-15 days but sometimes up to a month. It has evolved from a recitative-pantomime style of ritualized performance on unbounded field(s) to a culturally hybrid form of mimetic theatre on an open-air proscenium stage. Drawing on extensive research at over twenty Ramlilas in the state of Uttar Pradesh, this paper considers the distinctive role of the svarups or those who play the parts of the divine leads. Beginning with the celebrated Ramlila at Ramnagar, this paper argues that conventions at this ‘preservationist’ Ramlila work to performatively replicate existing social and gender hierarchies and normativities in Indian society, ones rooted in the nineteenth century when it was founded. Moving to ‘ordinary’ neighborhood Ramlilas, it further suggests that although such productions are often more progressive in their casting, many of the actors who step onto the Ramlila stage are compelled to simultaneously enact a number of social embodiments, and this is especially true of the men who play the parts of svarups and female characters, and also the professional dancers who are sometimes brought in to entertain and occasionally, signal moral depravity. In sum, this paper shows that those who do the affective work of performing divinity and gender in Ramlila must conform to certain social expectations around class, caste, gender, and even skin tone.
Date: 03/23/2018
Primary URL: https://www.eventscribe.com/2018/AAS/biography.asp?h=Participants
Primary URL Description: web site for the Association for Asian Studies annual conference
Conference Name: Association for Asian Studies annual conference

Lovely Fairies and Crafty Ghosts in Indian Tales (Book Section)
Title: Lovely Fairies and Crafty Ghosts in Indian Tales
Author: Pamela Lothspeich
Editor: Andrew Teverson
Abstract: not available
Year: 2019
Publisher: Routledge
Book Title: The Fairy Tale World

Impersonation in South Asia (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Impersonation in South Asia
Author: Pamela Lothspeich
Abstract: This symposium brought together seventeen scholars from a variety of ranks, disciplines and countries doing groundbreaking work on the subject of impersonation/guising/embodiment in modern and early modern South Asia. The expected outcome of the symposium is an edited volume on Impersonation in South Asia, which will be the first scholarly source to examine impersonation both in contemporary performative and quotidian contexts across South Asia. We understand impersonation as the temporary assumption of an identity or guise of a group that is not one’s own in social and aesthetic performative contexts, including the same as expressed in literature. Pamela Lothspeich organized the symposium and delivered a paper, "The Affective Work of Performing Divinity in the Theatre of Ramlila."
Date: 10/11/2018
Primary URL: https://confsouthasia.wiscweb.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/48/2018/10/2018-Annual-Conference-on-South-Asia-Program-Book-FINAL.pdf
Primary URL Description: conference program
Conference Name: Madison South Asia Conference

Paper Lives: Mobility, Citizenship and Belonging after Partition (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Paper Lives: Mobility, Citizenship and Belonging after Partition
Abstract: implications of the passport for citizenship in the modern states of India and Pakistan after Partition.
Author: Haimanti Roy
Date: 11/14/2019
Location: Nehru Memorial Museum and Library
Primary URL: http://nehrumemorial.nic.in/en/events/icalrepeat.detail/2019/11/14/955/-/paper-lives-mobility-citizenship-and-belonging-after-partition.html
Primary URL Description: Nehru Memorial Museum web site
Secondary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl3_496qBO4
Secondary URL Description: Youtube--complete lecture

Ras and Affect in Ramlila (and the Radheshyam Ramayana) (Article)
Title: Ras and Affect in Ramlila (and the Radheshyam Ramayana)
Author: Pamela Lothspeich
Abstract: This article gives insight into why verses from the "Radheshyam Ramayan," an early-twentieth century epic poem in Hindi–Urdu by Pandit Radheshyam Kathavachak, have been so widely adapted in India's theatre of Ramlila. Through a close reading of Kathavachak's chapter/scene "Dhanuṣ-yajña" (The Bow Ritual), and its staging at one amateur Ramlila in the author's hometown of Bareilly, this article argues that the text's bold, charming dialogues are very much suited to the themes and dramatic styling of Ramlila. Kathavachak's vigorous battles of wits between rivals are used to great effect not only in actual battle scenes, but also in rousing scenes like "The Bow Ritual" where Lakshman engages in fierce repartee with Parashuram after Ram's breaking of the bow. This article also brings together contemporary understandings of the critical terms ras (also spelled "rasa") and affect to help explicate this style of theatre
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/719419
Primary URL Description: web site of the journal
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Asian Theatre Journal 36,1

One flower from each garden: contradiction and collaboration in the canon of Mughal painters (Book Section)
Title: One flower from each garden: contradiction and collaboration in the canon of Mughal painters
Author: Yael Rice
Editor: Larry Silver and Kevin Terraciano
Abstract: unavailable
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://shop.getty.edu/products/canons-and-values-ancient-to-modern-978-1606065976
Primary URL Description: publisher web site
Publisher: Getty Research Institute
Book Title: Canons and Values: Ancient to Modern

Moonlight Empire: Lunar Imagery in Mughal India (Book Section)
Title: Moonlight Empire: Lunar Imagery in Mughal India
Author: Yael Rice
Editor: Christiane J. Gruber
Abstract: not available
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.academia.edu/38511403/Moonlight_Empire_Lunar_Imagery_in_Mughal_India
Primary URL Description: academia.edu site
Publisher: Agha Khan Museum
Book Title: The Moon: A Voyage Through Time

Disgust and Untouchability: Towards an Affective Theory of Caste (Article)
Title: Disgust and Untouchability: Towards an Affective Theory of Caste
Author: Joel Lee
Abstract: The caste order – like all social hierarchies – structures emotions in particular ways, and in turn depends on emotions, thus structured, for its reproduction over time. In North Indian vernaculars, to ask who feels ghṛṇā (disgust) towards whom is often to trace the boundaries of the touchable body politic. Ghṛṇā karnā – doing disgust – describes a set of practices often identical to those known in a political register as ‘practices of untouchability.’ Thus, ve ham se ghṛṇā karte hain (‘they are disgusted by us,’ or, better, ‘they practice disgust on us’) is among the more common ways that Dalits describe their treatment at the hands of privileged castes. This article tracks usages of ghṛṇā in two vernacular North Indian sources from the early twentieth century in order to throw critical light on the inculcation of disgust as advantaged and disadvantaged caste observers have described it. In Hindi tracts composed by members of the Hindu reformist organization the Arya Samaj, ghṛṇā appears as an impediment to the majoritarian project of Hindu encompassment of its erstwhile ‘untouchable’ other; Arya Samajist polemicists seek to expose Hindu disgust towards Dalits and to redirect it towards new targets. In oral traditions that circulated among Dalit castes engaged in sanitation labour in the late colonial period, parables of encounter between ‘touchable’ and ‘untouchable’ give utterance to a critique of ghṛṇā as antithetical to moral action and as opposed to life. Grounded in historical and ethnographic evidence, the article develops preliminary ideas towards an affective theory of caste and untouchability.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19472498.2021.1878784
Primary URL Description: Taylor & Francis web site
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: South Asian History and Culture 12, 2
Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Deceptive Majority: Dalits, Hinduism and Underground Religion (Book)
Title: Deceptive Majority: Dalits, Hinduism and Underground Religion
Author: Joel Lee
Abstract: The idea that India is a Hindu majority nation rests on the assumption that the vast swath of its population stigmatized as 'untouchable' is, and always has been, in some meaningful sense, Hindu. But is that how such communities understood themselves in the past, or how they understand themselves now? When and under what conditions did this assumption take shape, and what truths does it conceal? In this book, Joel Lee challenges presuppositions at the foundation of the study of caste and religion in South Asia. Drawing on detailed archival and ethnographic research, Lee tracks the career of a Dalit religion and the effort by twentieth-century nationalists to encompass it within a newly imagined Hindu body politic. A chronicle of religious life in north India and an examination of the ethics and semiotics of secrecy, Deceptive Majority throws light on the manoeuvres by which majoritarian projects are both advanced and undermined.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: http://services.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/anthropology/social-and-cultural-anthropology/deceptive-majority-dalits-hinduism-and-underground-religion?format=PB
Primary URL Description: Cambridge University Press web site
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9781108826662
Copy sent to NEH?: No


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=RA-235170-16